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' JBRAK ■ 





Observing The Stars. 

Grformances and exhibits, Pages '124-141 



The Heartbeat of Clarion, 
n student experience In a nutshell. Pages 34-93 



An All Around View, 
if organizations for a variety of Interests. Pages 142- 



lOdies In Motion. 

letlcs on and off the sidelines. Pages 178-209 

'EVIEW Pages 210-213 

ORY Pages 218-224 

y Mary Weyer 

1 



\QQO 



Id 

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/sequelle1989clar 




s a cluster of students gather in front of Carlson Library, the rays of the seldom seen sun shine on Clarion's kaleidoscope. 

Kaleidoscope 

Clarion University of Pennsylvania 

Clarion, Pennsylvania 16214 

Sequelle 1989 

Enrollment 6601 




;:.^-^o,oocro,^°j^^^w.a, 



Opening 




Keepsakes we 

treasure 
And friendships we 

make 
Lasting impressions 
Each holding a special 

place in our 

memories. 
Into the future 
Deciding our paths 
Our experiences have 

brought us this far. 
Self confidence 

develops 
Careers become 

clearer 
Observations 
Preparations 
Each turn we take 

determines our fate. 

-Anonymous 
-Design by Wendy 
Wieland 




Sharon Moore 

Ari artist captures a mo- 
ment of time in front of 
Founders Hall. 

John Stewart and Beth 
Toth pick a perfect day 
to breeze through the 
heart of campus. 



Opening 



Assortment of tiny prismatic flecks, 

Fragments 

Swirling, dancing, meshing, entwining 

Together. 

Individual pieces collaborate to create 

a visionary experience that is 

Unique 

Multi-faceted, colorfully scattered 

items coordinated in one 

Kaleidoscope. 

Variety of individuals — diverse 

personalities, habits and styles. 

Fragments 

Gathering, experiencing, changing 

Together. 

Flamboyant and unobtrusive — 

individuals conspire to be the epitome 

of 

Unique 

Photos, phrases, facts and fiction 

coordinate, presenting us with our own 

Kaleidoscope. 

-Mimi Benjamin 

-Design by Wendy Wielond 




Sharon Moore 

We won't be late for class 
for 15 years, boast two 
future Clarion students 

Taking care of business, 
Mike Dupree and com- 
panion head towards Still 
Hall tor another grueling 
business test 




Opening 




^^o familiar fr. 



Opening 



.^ 




-rs^™"-"- 



Opening 




A Kaleidoscope is an instrument containing 
loose bits of colored glass between two mirrors; 
placed in a way that changes of position of the 
bits of glass are reflected in an endless variety of 
patterns. 

It is also defined as a voriagated changing 
pattern or scene, a succession of changing 
phases or actions; shifting values, information and 
fashions ... It seems there is no other word that 
can better describe our bustling, exciting, every 
varying campus. 

In an attempt to capture one full year in the 
endless cycle of changes, we, the Sequelle Staff, 
are faced with endless variety and countless mo- 
ments that will never be exactly repeated. To 
wrap so many images into one book with one 
theme is to say the least, a challenge. That chal- 
lenge is the factor that led us to realize that from 
colors to values, friends and fortunes, "Kaleido- 
scopic" epitomizes the Clarion experience. 

During our years on this campus, we ore touch- 
ing lives, while discovering ourselves. Our days 
are a successive transition of events, each one 
serving as a period of growth. We are growing 
together and growing opart. 

We hope to have catured not only these 
thoughts and the essence of this campus at the 
close of the decade, but the effect it has had on 
the students. Because each sound of laughter, 
every thought and idea, and perception are bril- 
liantly fused together in this, our Clarion 
Kaleidoscope. 

-The 1989 Sequelle Staff 
-Design by Wendy Wieland 




Dovor Photo 

We'll muddle through 
whatever we do togeth- 



Experienced student. 
Cherry Mayo, is always 
prepared for Clarion's 
■§ sudden cloudbursts. 



Opening 



HOROSCOPE : 



Blight Futures Ahead 



Finally arriving at the end of the many trials and tribulations, we emerge from 
Clarion University well-rounded, mature, experienced and ambious. It is impossible 
to be totally prepared for the future, but we hove come to realize that learning 
doesn't stop in the classroom, when we reach a certain age or when we receive a 
degree. Though many seniors feel a wave of relief at graduation, down deep we 
know that this is only the beginning. Our lives will forever be an accumulation of 
knowledge. 

- Michael Dupree, Section Editor 

- Section design by James Dentel, IVIicliael Dupree and Wendy Wieiand 



Beth Alberta 

ELED 

William Alexander 

SBIO 

Sandy Lynne Alien 

ELED 

Mark Allison 

RE 



Steven Alston 

ACCT/MKTG 

Linda Ambrose 

ELED 

Larry Anderson 

MGMT 

Alfred Angiolieri 

COMM 



Kimberly Anthony 

ACCT 

David Archinal 

ACCT 

Timothy Artman 

MKTG 

Leah Audio 

FIN 



Laura Bobock 

MKTG 

Edward Bochner 

ACCT 

Bret Boillie 

ACCT 

Brenda Baker 

HAB 



Karen Balint 

SCOMM 

Bernice Bamburak 

COMM 

India Barker 

MGMT 

Patricio Borr 

MKTG 



Kimberly Bortel 

SOC/PSY 

Raymond Bortolli 

COMM 

Michael Bates 

MGMT 

Christine Bauer 

MGMT 



Lee Baughman 

MATH/CIS 

Wayne Bouman 

MKTG 

David Bayline 

MGMT 

Dale Beck 

RE 





Tammy Beck 

ELED 

Pamela Bell 

ELED 

Jane Bender 

COMM 

Ann Marie Bendig 

MKTG 



Maryanne Benjamin 

SENG 

Julie Marie Bennet 

ELED 

Timothy Benninger 

MATH 

Marvin Bergman 

PSYC 



Annette Bergstrom 

ELED 

Jacquelyn Berl<owitz 

ELED/ECH 

Ruth Bermudez 

PS 

Kendra Bershol< 

CAIS 



Dyann Best 

SPA 

Mary Biesiadny 

SPED 

Julianne Blacl< 

FIN/RE 

Wade Blacl< 

MKTG 



Brian Blaha 

CAIS 

Michael Blair 

SSOC 

Beth Blazetic 

FIN 

Pamela Bleggi 

ELED 



Laura Bliley 

ELED 

Yolanda Bongiovanni 

MKTG 

John Boozel 

SED 

Louis Bornes 

ELED 



Michelle Bosaz 

MGMT 

Michaeline Botti 

SES 

Elizabeth Bowman 

INDR 

BIyth Boyer 

MKTG 



Seniors 



11 



Lisa Bradley 

SP 

Catherine Brady 

COMM 

Robert Brant 

FIN 

Darci Bratter 

PSYC 



Barbara Braunbeck 

MKTG 

Chris Ann Breeger 

SCHEM 

Mary Brennen 

ACCT 

Daniel Brinley 

COMM 



Melissa Brison 

SP 

John Bronico 

COMM 

Melissa Brothers 

MKTG 

Nanette Brown 

SP 



Debbie Bruno 

ACCT 

Marjorie Bucholz 

SENG 

Kimberly Burford 

MKTG 

Karl Burns 

CIS 



Beth Bushyeager 

ELED/ECH 

Rachael Busin 

HBSC 

Jeffrey Butler 

COMM 

Roberta Byrd 

PSYC 



Miriam Calvorese 

MKTG 

Lisa Carberry 

ACCT 

Keith Cecchini 

MKTG 

Carl Ceglar 

CAIS 



Woi Kwan Chan 

MATH 

Rudy Cincalo 

COMM 

Steve Cindrich 

COMM 

Sharin Clark 

ELED 




12 




Amelia Clayton 

ELED 

Annette Clemens 

ELED 

Gregory Clemenson 

SES 

Vickie Clements 

SMAT 



Jonna Coaclnman 

ENG 

Tim Cochran 

ACCT 

Julie Lynn Coe 

ELED 

Georgiona Cole 

ELED 



Kevin Collier 

PSYC 

Catherine Collins 

SPA 

Monica Collins 

ELED 

Tracy Conner 

ELED 



Michael Connors 

SPED 

Deborah Cook 

RUSS 

Gina Cook 

MKTG 

l^ay Cope 

SMAT 



Peter Coray 

SSOC 

Kammi Rae Cotter 

SPED 

Cynthia Cowell 

ECHD 

Debbie Crandall 

MGMT 



Bonnie Crate 

ACCT 

Janet Cressman 

CIS 

Christine Cromer 

SPA 

David Crouse 

MKTG 



Blaine Curran 

SED 

Donald Custer 

SES 

Gina Marie D'Andrea 

ELED 

Debra Davis 

ELED 



Seniors 



13 



John Davis 

SED 

Erin DeBacco 

COMM 

Gerl-Lyn DeFelice 

FIN 

Diane DeMarchi 

MKTG 



Michelle Dean 

MKTG 

mark Decroo 

PSYC 

Mary Decroo 

ED 

Gregory Deemer 

SED 



Shelley Deeter 

COMM 

Dawn Deivert 

SPA 

Mary Dellane 

COMM 

Laurie Dennis 

COMM 



Deborah Detsch 

ECH/ELED 

Donald Dickson 

ELED 

Marina DiMartino 

COMM 

Sherri Dingel 

ELED 



Dale Ditz 

ELED 

Yvonne Dobrzanski 

ELED 

Valda Dodson 

PSYC 

Edward Donovan 

COMM/RUSS 

Richard Dopkosky 

FIN 

J, Patrick Doran 

ACCT 

Elizabeth Dornbrock 

MKTG 

Verna Douglass 

ECH/ELED 



Ramon Dourado 

MGMT 

Karen Dufty 

ACCT 

Clarence Dupree 

COMM 

Erika Durst 

MUED 




Seniors 



14 




Angela Dykins 

COMMAT 

Andrea Dzadony 

ELED 

Christine Eal<er 

BiO 

Ctnristine Eaton 

CAIS 



Jane Ecl<strom 
FIN/RE 

Jennifer Elder 
ELED 

Steven Engei 
COMM 
Kathy Engle 
SMAT 



Barbara Erdesky 

MT 

Todd Evans 

ACCT 

Susan Fagiey 

FiN/RE 

David Farquhar 

MKTG 



Nicholo Fedorczyk 

ELED 

Lorraine Feldmeier 

MGMT 

Lisa Fenstermaker 

MKTG 

Micheie Finch 

COMM 



Stephanie Finn 

ELED 

Thomas Finnerty 

MGMT 

Shannon Fitzgerald 

FIN 

Robert Fix 

SCT 



Glenn Fleck 

SSCI 

Thomas Foley 

CAIS 

Alan Foreman 

MGMT 

Thomas Forsey 

COMM 



James Fortney 

COMM 

Maureen Freimuth 

COMM 

Amy Jo Frey 

PSYC 

Robert Fry 

MKTG 



Seniors 



15 



Tara Fry 

ELED 

Kace Fulmer 

SOCSCI 

Stephen Furdak 

ELED 

John Galbo 

ESCI 



Sheila Gastiger 

MKTG 

Maria Gatesman 

SOC/PSYC 

Andrea Gavel 

ELED 

Aggy George 

HAB 



Catherine Gerrich 

MKTG 

Deidre Geyer 

SMATH 

Sheryl Ghindea 

MKTG 

Darlene Glatt 

ACCT 



Denise Glivic 

ECH 

Tricia Gluvno 

ELED 

Gena Gochnour 

HAB 

Christopher Golemi 

MKTG 



Nancy Gourley 

COMM 

Chelly Grabowski 

BIO 

Ron Graybill 

MGMT 

Molly Greenawalt 

SENG 



Loretha Greene 

PS 

Connie Grego 

FIN 

Karen Gregory 

ACCT 

Wendy Grosch 

ELED 



Karen Gross 

ELED 

Carol Grubb 

ELED 

Michele Guisewite 

COMM 

Linda Gunn 

MKTG 




Seniors 



16 






Davor Photo 




"What do you 
expect me to do? 
Stand around and 
sing show tunes?" 
-Rob Fix, BFA in Acting 



Sharon Moore 



Seniors 



Your final year of college: the exhilarating 
feeling of achievement, interviewing for future 
positions, self actualization, beaming parents. 
The whole year is kind of a preparation for the 
big "coming out" party of academla . . . 
graduation. 

Yet amid the jubilation of breal<lng over Into 
the "real world", the dark hood of death crash- 
es the party. Hovering anxiously over the senior 
class is the most devastating, tragic, and fatal 
condition, fedred by every graduate: Senioritls. 

This horrid disease strikes 9 out of every 10 
seniors to some degree as they try to survive 
their senior year unscarred. All seniors have an 
equal chance at contracting the condition, and 
some survive. Others, however, are not so lucky. 

The symptoms are subtle of first, beginning 
with excessive class absences, due to a soap 
opera the unknowing victim could not miss. Eve- 
ning outings have increased from Friddy and 
Saturday nights only to include a week night 
here or there, and procrastination becomes a 
problem. As mentioned before, these symptoms 
are often unnoticeable at first and sometimes 
the disease only manifests Itself thus far . . . 
sometimes. 

In many tragic cases, the deterioration bolts 
into the second stage of incubation. Second 
semester Senioritls classes include Fiber I, Bowl- 
ing, Earth Science, and Modern Dance, hoping 
that the dean will overlook the fact that you 
never quite got around to taking that General 
Macro-economics class required for graduation. 
Every night Is a party night, and you've been 
out so much you forget your room number. The 
money you get for books has been spent on 
two Clarion sweatshirts, a pock of Klondike Bars, 
and something else, you can't quite recall. And 
your refund check? Has it been responsibly de- 
posited in the bank so that you can begin pay- 
ing on you $12,000 loan? No way. You've been 
test driving the new Porsche 921. Yes, by stage 
two even a quack can diagnose Senioritls. Yet, 
by this time. It's too late. There is no making up 
grades, returning sweatshirts, and you ate the 
Klondike Bars. 

And so the saga continues, year after year, 
senior after senior. Surviving the monster con be 
a learning experience and better you for the 
rest of your life. Those stricken the hardest. In so 
deep that there is no hope of recovery reap the 
final woe . . , R.I.P. . , . Return In Probation. 

-Sharon Mliier 



Senioritis 



i7 



Linda Guntrum 

ELED 

Janice Gustafson 

SBIO 

Diane Hobjon 

PSYC 

William Haas 

CAIS 



Nancy Hall 

MKTG 

Victoria Hall 

FIN 

Brian Hamilton 

PSYC 

Annette Hargenroder 

ELED 



Catherine Hartle 

ECH/ELED 

Erin Hartle 

MGMT 

Nancy Hartwell 

CAIS 

Michael Haspel 

MGMT 



Patricia Hauber 

GER/RUS 

Amy Haun 

ELED 

Carrie Hawley 

PSYC 

Douglas Hayward 

MGMT 



Lisa Heeter 

COMM 

Jeri Heffran 

SPED/GER 

Elizabeth Heidenreich 

COMM 

Robert Heming 

COMM 



Colin Henkes 

ES/GEO 

Brian Henry 

MUED/FR 

David Hernon 

FIN 

Scott Higgins 

MGMT 



Cliftord Himes 

CIS 

Sharon Hixon 

MGMT/MKTG 

Kitt Hodgson 

COMM 

Patrick Hoenig 

COMM 




Seniors 



18 




Vicki Hoffman 

MK»TG 

Barbara Hoover 

ENG 

Keith Hoppe 

FIN 

Jenifer Houllion 

COMM 



Nancy Hovanec 

MGMT 

Meaghan Hrabovsky 

MKTG 

Deanna Huba 

ELED 

Kimberly Hudal< 

MKTG 



Barry Hudson 

RE 

Jeffery Hudson 

CIS 

Nancy Huff 

SMAT 

Paula Huffman 

ELED 



Mary Hughes 

ELED 

Beth Hull 

FIN 

Beth Hutcheson 

ELED 

Lisa Inderlied 

SENG 



Scott Inglese 

SSCI 

David Inzana 

RE 

Rodney John 

HUM 

Arthur Johnson 

MGMT 



Cheryl Johnson 
SPED/HAB 
Jill Johnston 
ELED/SPED 
Mary Joiv\/in 
MGMT/LS 
Robin Jonas 
ACCT 



Mary Ann Joy 

BIO 

Michelle Jurkovic 

MKTG 

Kristin Kearney 

ENG 

Shelli Kearney 

CAIS 



Seniors^ 



Sharon Keller 

ACCT 

Debora Kempka 

ELED 

Debbie Kennedy 

INDR 

Susan Kennedy 

MKTG 



Rhonda Kennemuth 

ACCT 

Aaron Kijowski 

ECON 

Steve Kijowski 

MKTG 

Stacey Kimble 

HAB 



Edward KInch 

SMAT 

Kelly Klauss 

MKTG 

Roian Koerber 

ECH 

Dawn Kolacinski 

ECH/ELED 



Tonni Kotowski 

SENG 

Debra Kotula 

MGMT 

Michael Kowalski 

ACCT 

Paul Kraus 

FIN 



Lisa Kreider 

HAB/SPED 

A. Charles Krempa 

FIN 

Mary Ann Kristoff 

SMAT/SPHY 

Jefferey Kuhn 

MKTG 



Michael Kuhno 

CIS 

Barbara Kunkle 

ELED 

Jeanne Kunkle 

SPAN 

Jennifer Kunkle 

SPA 



Ruth Kurdilla 

BIO 

Sande Kuzio 

SPCOM 

Maureen Lafferty 

MGMT 

Julianne Landis 

MATH/ACTU 




Seniors 



20 




Edward Lane 

MGMT 

Gretchen Lascek 

SPED 

Sharon Laslavic 

ELED 

Barbara LaVan 

HAB 



Lisa LaVan 
ECH/ELED 
Vicki Lazar 
SMAT/SPHY 
Lori LeBarron 
BUS 

Eric Lee 
ACCT 



Katlnleen Leone 

SBIO 

Ciaran Lesil<ar 

SPED 

Stacey Levy 

COMM 

Francine Liberto 

COMM 



Terrence Ligdoy 

ACCT 

Leslie Lindohl 

ELED 

Janet Lindsey 

ELED 

Tamnny Lininger 

SPA 



Laura Link 

ELED 

Paui Liprando 

MKTG 

Victor Lisotto 

ACCT 

Fyaro Liew 

COMM 



William Llewellyn 

COMM 

Anne Lockwood 

ELED/SPED 

Stepheny Lojiu 

SMAT 

Larry Loreman 

CAIS 



Gregory Loscar 

COMM 

Patrick Lucas 

COMM 

Duane Luckenbill 

CHEM 

Kathryn Ludwig 

ACCT 



Seniors 



21 



Robert Mack 

MKTG 

Karen MacVay 

MUMKTG 

Stephanie Madden 

BIO 

Marjorie Major 

MKTG 



James Moloney 

ACCT 

Debra Morchand 

ELED 

Kelly Morek 

SMAT 

Carolonn Morionno 

MKTG 



Michelle Morko 

HIST 

Rheo Martin 

MGMT 

Zeimo Johnson Martin 

HAB 

Anthony Martinez 

MKTG 



Roberta Mascari 

COMM 

Kimberly Mason 

SMAT 

Diane Master 

MGMT 

Susan Moto 

ELED 



Mary Motherne 

COMM 

Donna Motovcik 

CAIS 

Scott Maxwell 

HIST 

Douglas May 

MUED 



Dennis Mozur 

COMM 

Debra McAdams 

MKTG 

Robert McAdams 

ACCT 

Lisa McAdoo 

SOC/PSYC 

Rebecca McCobe 

SOC 

Ann McCall 

MGMT 

Kathleen McCarthy 

SPA 

Robert McCarthy 

MKTG 




Seniors 



22 




Sandra McCollough 

ACCT 

Cathleen McConnell 

MGMT 

Penny McDole 

CAIS 

Mary Beth McGervey 

MKTG 



Anita McKlaine 

SOC 

Timothy McMeans 

COMM 

Cathy McMillen 

ELED 

Coanne McNift 

ECH 



Melissa McQuillen 
ELED 

David Meier 
MGMT 

Jeffrey Millar 
MKTG 

Barbara Miller 
SPA 



Julie Miller 

ACCT 

Timothy Minton 

MKTG 

Jonathan Mitchell 

ACCT 

Joan Mix 

ECH/ELED 



Peter Molinaro 

PSYC 

Tracy Montgomery 

SPA 

Mike Montedoro 

ELED 

Corina Moore 

FIN 



Tracy Moore 

MATH/ACTU 

D. Renee Morgan 

ELED 

Judy Morgan 

ELED 

Neil Morgan 

ACCT 



Todd Moser 

FIN 

Bonnie Muha 

ELED 

Dawn Muroski 

ELED 

W. Michael Murphy 

ECON 



Seniors 



23 



Allyson Myers 

HIST 

Robin Myers 

BIO 

Kathryn Neal 

ELED 

Katnleen Noir 

MGMT 



Jeffery Nuhfer 

COMM 

Christopher Ookes 

ACCT 

Lynn Olsen 

SPA 

Theodore O'Molley 

MGMT 



Tim O'Neil 

SMAT 

Alicia Opal 

MKTG 

Mellissa O'Rourke 

ELED 

Lynn Paczkowski 

COMM 



Lori Page 

MGMT 

Jennifer Palazzo 

COMM 

Laura Parmele 

SSOC 

Joyce Pasquorette 

MKTG 



Gary Patterson 

COMM 

Matthew Pearson 

PSYC 

Scott Pegram 

SPCOM 

Joseph Perhoch 

MKTG 



Ellen Perlman 

PSYC 

Joseph Perrone 

BSAD 

Damon Peters 

ACCT 

Amy Pfeifer 

COMM 



Diane Phelan 

ECH 

Sondra Piccirillo 

MKTG 

Jodi Pifer 

MKTG 

Lorretta Piper 

ELED 




Seniors 



24 




Davor Photo 




Wendy Wieland 

What a life! But 
someone has to 
lead It. 

-Tony Moton 



Senior Purchases 



Cap and gown, "89" tassel, invi- 
tations ... if you are playing 
"$10,000 Pyramid" and those were 
the clues, what would you guess? If 
you took a stab at it and said, "Se- 
nior Purchases", you would win! But 
that's the easy stuff, the stuff that 
everyone automatically thinks of 
when it comes to what's involved 
with senior year. What other pur- 
chases fall under that category? 
Having your resume typeset or 
copied, establishing your creden- 
tial file at Career Services, and in- 
vesting in an "interviewing outfit" 
can make you feel the senior pinch 
in your wallet. But, can you believe 
it, there's more! If you choose to 
purchase a class ring and/or senior 
pictures, those things really add 
up. There are always those little in- 
cidentals . . . things like a "Clarion 
University Alumnus" sweatshirt from 



the bookstore, graduation cards 
for friends, and a car, (okay, so 
maybe it's not exactly a "little inci- 
dental"). What more can there 
be? You can only hope that, when 
your shopping is done, you have 
enough money to buy a stamp to 
send a graduation invitation card 
to your family. It can be pretty ex- 
pensive being a senior, but it's all 
worth it in the end! 

-Mimi Benjamin 

By the time you become a senior, 
you can't afford to pay attention. 
There is a secret to financial success 
at college; it's called mom and 
dad's bank account. 

-Steve Cindrich 



Seniors 



25 



Roseann Pisano 

SPA 

Christine Plumb 

BSAD 

Michael Popella 

MGMT/RE 

Fred Port 

MGMT 



Todd Post 

MGMT 

Susan Prezel 

ACCT 

Marcy Prystaloski 

ECH 

Theresa Puskar 

COMM 



Jaqueiine Rafferty 

SPA 

Anita Ronsel 

MGMT 

Julie Rapsinski 

MGMT 

Steve Reavy 

MKTG 



Debra Reed 

SPA 

Renee Rehner 

ELED 

Roxane Reinsel 

ELED 

Alan Reisfield 

ACCT 



Terri Repak 

LS 

Teresa Rerko 

ELED/ECH 

Randall Resovsky 

ACCT 

Mary Retort 

SPCOM/SED 



Nancy Richert 

COMM 

Eric Richey 

COMM 

Stephen Rifici 

PSYC 

L. Eric Rigler 

COMM 



David Riley 

COMM/MKTG 

Jill Rinderle 

ECH 

Amy Rippin 

SENG 

Shawn Ritts 

SBIO 




nft'^n 




Seniors 



26 




Pamela Roddy 

HAB 

Christopher Rojik 

MKTG 

Kevin Romine 

HIST 

John Root 

ELED 



Jacqueline Ross 

MGMT 

Maureen Ross 

ELED 

Kerrie Rossi 

MGMT 

Beth Roth 

ELED 



Amy Rothen 

ACCT 

Mary Ann Ruffing 

PSYC 

Ann Rummel 

ECH 

Joanna Russell 

ECH/ELED 



Lisa Russell 

ACCT 

Tracy Ryan 

CAIS 

Linda Ryer 

ELED 

Daniel Samarin 

COMM 



Melody Sample 
PSY/ELED 
Morgan Sands 
COMM 
Mark Sanner 
COMM 

Edward Sauer 
MKTG 



Andrew Sayers 

FIN 

Sandra Schaltenbrand 

SMAT 

Amy Schanck 

ECH 

Julia Scheel 

COMM 



Christian Scheuerman 

ECON 

Connie Schill 

ECH 

Dee Ann Schirf 

ELED 

Linda Schirmer 

SMAT 



Seniors 



21 



Demise Schmidt 

PSYC 

Jodi Schneider 

ECH 

Christine Schnur 

ELED 

Jack Schroder 

COMM 



Scott Schrecengost 

MGMT 

Vicki Schreiber 

COMM 

Ronald Schupp 

ACCT 

Chris Schuster 

ELED 



Tammy Schuster 

MKTG 

Douglas Schwab 

FIN 

Deborah Scolari 

ELED 

Sharon Scully 

COMM 



Dean Scuticchio 

COMM 

Becky Seaman 

COMM 

Sandra Seeler 

RE 

Mike Seniow 

COMM 



Lisa Shocreow 

ACCT 

Kimberly Shatter 

COMM 

Dana Shannon 

MKTG 

Laura Shannon 

COMM 



Lynne Shannon 

SP 

Michael Shapiro 

CIS 

David Sheatz 

SPED/ELED 

Julie Shick 

ELED 



Wendy Shick 

ACCT 

Roderic Showers 

SSOC 

Thomas Schultz 

PHIL/MATH 

Jeffery Shumaker 

MKTG 




Seniors 



28 




Stacey Slat 

ELED 

Kenneth Smakula 

MT 

Jill Smart 

ELED 

April Smith 

CAIS 



Barbara Smith 

HAB 

Catherine Smith 

SPED/HAB 

Chris Smith 

SSOC/PSYC 

Christine Smith 

ELED 



Lisa Smith 

PSYC 

Susan Smith 

COMM 

Joseph Snodgrass 

ES/GEO 

Donald Snyder 

ENG 



Donna Snyder 

MGMT 

Deborah Stahl 

MGMT 

David Stauffer 

ACCT 

Thomas Steeley 

ACCT 



Marlene Steffan 

ELED 

Colleen Stevens 

ELED 

Richard Stevens 

COMM 

Marina Stohr 

MUMKTG 



Robert Stormer 

ES/GEO 

Stephanie Stotler 

SPA 

John Straititf 

COMM 

Karen Strauser 

ELED 



Robin Strauser 

ACCT/FIN 

Sharon Strauser 

ELED 

Janet Strickenberger 

PSYC 

Catherine Summerville 

MKTG 



Seniors 



29 



James Swanson 

FIN 

Lisa Swanson 

MKTG 

Lisa Swanson 

HAB 

Kristen Swick 

FIN 



Ajijah Talip 

SSCI 

Delia Tarabella 

ED 

Rob Taylor 

MGMT/INDR 

Kathy Tepper 

COMM 



Lisa Thomas 

ACCT 

Brenda Thompson 

ECH 

Heather Thompson 

SED/SSOC 

Stephanie Thompson 

ELED 



Robert Todd 

HAB/SPED 

Renee Toth 

ACCT 

Clarissa Totu 

PSYC 

Timothy Trone 

FIN 



Kathy Trypus 

ACCT 

Pamela Twigg 

RUSS/FR 

Paul Usoff 

CAIS 

Thomas Valasek 

ACCT 



Randy Vasbinder 

PS 

Deana Vassel 

ELED 

Michelle Venture 

ELED 

Michele Vespoli 

MATH 



Carol Vessa 

• COMM 

Mark Vignovich 

ACCT 

Ann Marie Vinopal 

SENG 

Jaime Virgilio 

SMAT/SPAN 




Seniors 



30 




Cindy Vogan 

PSYC 

Paul Vogel 

SMAT 

Jackie Voigt 

SSCI 

Christopher Vosler 

FiN 



Kathleen Vranic 

SPCOMM 

William Waddell 

COMM 

Jeffrey Wadovicl< 

ACCT 

Joni Wagner 

SBIO 



DeAnn Walker 

ELED/ECH 

Elizabeth Walker 

ELED 

Wendy Walsh 

PSYC 

Lisa Walthour 

ELED 



Deborah Weightman 

ECH/ELED 

Scott Wentzel 

CIS 

Kimberly West 

MKTG 

Diana Wethli 

MKTG 



Jefferson Whalen 

MGMT 

Melissa Whitling 

PSYC 

Robert Whitman 

MGMT/MKTG 

Jane Williams 

COMM 



Mary Williams 

ELED 

Michael Williams 

PHY 

Michelle Williams 

ELED 

Ted Williams 

ACCT 



Brett Wilson 

MKTG 

Kimberly Wilson 

MKTG 

Peggy Wilson 

ECH/ELED 

Tommy Winegardner 

COMM 



Seniors 



3^ 



Douglas Wingenbach 

ACCT 

Alaina Winters 

COMM 

Matthew Wirfel 

MUED 

Sheila Wolbert 

ELED 



Tammy Wolfe 

ELED 

Robyn Wolff 

ELED 

Patricio Wong 

SOCS 

David Worek 

MGMT 



Stephanie Woytko 

MATH/ACTS 

Robert Wyar 

SPCOMM 

MoryAnn Yanchok 

MKTG 

Barry Yoncosek 

CAIS 



Scott Yonkin 

ACCT 

Holly Young 

ECH/ELED 

Susan Younginger 

FIN 

Margaret Zophiris 

ECH/ELED 

John Zostowney 

ECON 

Janice Zawacki 

SMAT 

Tammy Zents 

ENG 

Missy Zimmermann 

MT 



Karen Zitzelman 
ELED 




Seniors 



32 





I'm leaving behind 
my youth, childhood 
inhibitions and 
memories I've 
experienced. It is time 
to put to use the 
knowledge I've 
gathered this far, and 
see how far it is 
possible to go in life. 
Now is the time to set 
your goals and strive 
towards them. - Bill 
Waddell 



Wendy Wieland 



What I leave 
behind 

As the frustrations and struggles 
of senior year set in, my automat- 
ic reaction is, "I can't wait to 
graduate!" But even thougli the 
excitement of commencement 
thrills me, I realize that I'm losing in 
spite of my gain. I don't think 
many of us stop to think about 
what we will leave behind when 
we grab that diploma and 
pounce on "the real world." 
When I leave Clarion, I'll leave be- 
hind the world of college life. I'll 
leave all-night study sessions and 
blowing off class, giving tours on 
campus and mulling of the news- 
paper class-list to find 18 credits- 
worth to take for a semester. Fi- 
nal exams and locating my ID so I 
can dine at Chandler will be 
things of the past. Hanging out in 
front of the library, standing in 
long lines at the bookstore, and 
marathon pizza binges (extra 
cheese, please!) won't occur like 
they did during my years at Clari- 
on University. My ten-hour-per- 
week campus job for minimum 
wage will hopefully turn into a 
multi-million dollar job contract 
and my one-room living space 
will be left to my junior roommate 
and the next inhabitant who will 
hang her posters on my wall. So 
when the last strains of "Pomp 
and Circumstance" echo 
through Marwick-Boyd Auditori- 
um, I'll bid a fond farewell to 
Thursdays at the Roost, CAB's on 
Saturday nights. Center Board's 
Sunday night movies. Student 
Senate and all other campus 
meetings, friends that I feel like 
I've known forever, and Autumn 
Leaf Festivals (well, can you ever 
really say "Farewell" to ALF?). 
And through the smiles and tears 
of goodbye, it's not what I leave 
behind that I'll keep in mind. It's 
what I take with me that counts 
— not just a piece of paper say- 
ing I've completed my degree — 
but all the memories that I've ac- 
cumulated here at Clarion 
University. 

-Mimi Benjamin 




Seniors 



33 




A diversity of unique students 
make up Ciairon's Kaleido- 
scope. 

Perspectives change lil<e the 
weather at Clarion during the 
college years. 







STETHOSCOPE: 

The Heartbeat of Clarion 

Clarion University, as a whole, is like an organism. Its knowlegable administrative 
brain runs activities smoothly and fairly. Its beautiful landscape serves as a warm 
and inviting skin for the University. The arms of Clarion University consist of the 
groups and coalitions that reach out to the community and meet the needs of the 
students. But, the most important part of the Clarion body, the port that makes the 
whole organism work and allows It to exist, is the students who clearly make up the 
heart of Clarion University, The heartbeat of Clarion encompasses every aspect of 
student lifestyles and illustrates the importance of a diverse and unique experience 
in a healthy living environment. 

- Crystal Blanding, Student Life Assistant 

Section design by James Dental and Wendy Wieland 



TRADITONS: 



Clarion. For some, the name Is nothing 
more than a main street, as exciting as 
something out of the Andy Griffith Show. 
You expect to bump Into Opee. For oth- 
ers, however, it is a serene piece of Ameri- 
cana painted by Norman Rockwell: teen- 
agers In red and white high school letter 
jackets, blue jeans folded Into a cuft and 
saddle shoes, falling in love as they walk 
hand In hand beneath dim street lights 
Clarion Is kept safe from the world of 
problems, considering an accumulation of 
parking tickets Its biggest headache For 
fifty-one weeks of the year, through bitter 
winters, wet springs, scorching summers, 
and the most beautiful of autumns. Clari- 
on is the image of tranquility. But as oil 
adages have their roots in meaning, so 
does." You can hove too much of a good 



Autumn Leaf 1989 

thing." 

Seven days a year, the quiet peaceful- 
ness Is Interrupted by over 100,000 people 
jam packing hotel rooms, lining the 
streets. Main street is suddenly flavored 
with the tastes of food and drink while 
people dash left and right going to places 
that only they know Carnival rides, toot- 
ball, car shows, and a parade are the 
yearly customs and rituals This Is all inter- 
woven with friends, family, and other 
loved ones, offering something for every 
taste and fun tor all All of the gaiety takes 
place In the midst of more gorgeous rustic 
colors than could ever be found in any 
box of crayons 

A queen Is crowned, a victory won, and 
a town IS shaken at Its foundation. Then 
the carnival rides come down one by one. 



the old antique cars drive homeward with 
their trophies, and children walk behind 
their parents with grape cotton candy 
stuck on their soft cheeks. Once the 
scraps are put in their proper places, the 
only remnant left is the trees with their 
dazzling colors. Another Autumn Leaf Fes- 
tival has come and gone. 

In a few weeks the winds will grow bitter 
again. For now Main Street is peaceful, as 
Is all of Clarion We will grow away from 
our friends, and the echoing laughter of 
the Autumn Leaf Festival will bring the oc- 
cassional smile, but hang on dearly to the 
memory of commaradery, silliness, dnd 
watching a parade on the roof of a green 
house. 

-David Allan Fry 

-Page Design By Wendy WIeland 










A melancholy hobo makes his 
way down Clarion's main street 
during the ALF parade. 

The Theta Chi house supplies the 
best seats for parade viewers. 

Roe Ewaskey Is worm after her 
parade ride in a hot tub 

Sunday's antique auto show 
brought classic car critiques of 
all ages. 




Student Life 



36 




ALF and friends go together like 
Clarion and rain. 

Page Design By James Dante! 



Student Life 



39 



PLEASANT SURPRISES: 



As unlikely as it may have 
seemed. Clarion was blessed with 
a bright, luke warm, autumn day 
for homecoming Saturday 15, 
1988. Crowds gathered early to 
watch the infamous two hour 
Clarion Autumn Leaf Parade, The 
parade's usual performers made 
their appearances. These includ- 
ed the procession of antique 
cars, the area marching bands, 
Greek floats, and the Zem Zems. 
On the most populated day in 



Clarion University's 1988 Home- 
coming Court 

Mimi Benjamin, Tern McDonald, 
and Sharon Miller serve free hot- 
dogs and chili to returning Alum- 
ni during the ALF parade 



It Didn't Rain On Our Parade 

Clarion, over 100,000 patrons fol- 
lowed the parade by making 
their annual trek to the stadium 
for another memorable home- 
coming football game. 

Though the game wasn't ex- 
actly Clarion's biggest victory, 
the day was far from lost as the 
masses filed bock to main street 
to enjoy the rest of the attrac- 
tions. Students and alumni min- 
gled under the alumni tent savor- 
ing the complimentary hotdogs 
and warm hot cocoa provided 
by the Alumni Association. Still 



others treated themselves to the 
apple dumplings, taffy, fudge, 
cotton candy, buffalo wings, cal- 
zone, fries, Chinese egg rolls, gy- 
ros, cheese steaks, elephant 
ears, candy apples ,,and stuffed 
themselves silly. Rides on the Tilt- 
A-Whirl, darts, ping-pong balls, 
and the forementioned dinner 
menu equal indigestion, and car 
full of gold fish, but all in all a satis- 
fying homecoming day, 

-Sharon Miller 

-Page Design By Wendy 
Wieland 




Student Life 



40 




student Life 



41 



Getting from one place to an- 
ottier Is tougher tor some than 
others. 

Though most students resort to 
THE SHOELEATHER EXPRESS, this 
Sig Ep finds an alternative way 
around campus 




« 



i 



i 



FEET: 



The lack of sufficient parking 
space at Clarion University has re- 
vived one of civilization's oldest 
forms of transportation: THE 
SHOELEATHER EXPRESS. 

Walking is the most popular 
and practical method of getting 
to classes at Clarion University. An 
inexperienced Clarion student, 
however, initially experiences a 
host of pedestrian terrors. These 
include avoiding dozens of abys- 
mal puddles, dodging mainte- 
nance "buggies" that mistake 
our sidewalks for grand prix race- 



The College Mass Transit 

ways, and making the fatal as- 
sumption that pedestrians have 
the "right of way" on Clarion 
streets. 

Yet, the most adventurous en- 
deavor requires a student to 
manage Clarion's treacherous 
terrain during winter weather. 
January's snows have caused 
plenty of thrills and spills for those 
of meager balance or inappropri- 
ate footware. Boots, Ducks, Ree- 
boks, Nikes, and Docksiders are 
common, but high-heeled pumps 
are simply non-existant. 



With a little determination and 
regular exercise anyone can 
master THE SHOELEATHER EX- 
PRESS. After all, it is totally cost 
efficient, and you are almost al- 
ways guaranteed to make it any- 
where on campus in ten minutes 
or less... unless, of course, you are 
hit by someone riding a 
skateboard. 

-Steve Cindrich 

-Page Design By Wendy 
Wieland 




Student Life 



42 




student Life 



43 




Hey, You Guise! 




. -•■ . Ma 

n By Wendy Wieland 



Student Life 



44 



SAME DIFFERENCE: 



Because We Are So Different, 
We Have So Much To Share 



► 



i 



During the 1988-89 academic 
year. Clarion University proudly 
announced their record high en- 
rollment of 6,001 students. Clarion 
continues to serve a population 
consisting of people from a vari- 
ety of cities, towns, states, and 
foreign countries. Even though 
the students are from different 
v^alks of life, each student has 
something unique and worthvi/hile 
to attribute to the overall envi- 
ronment. Clarion University is truly 
a diversified four-year institution 
which welcomes individuals of 
any color, creed, or national ori- 
gin. Obviously each student is dif- 
ferent, yet students find so many 
things to share with one another. 



Sharing cultures, attitudes, and 
experiences is one way for stu- 
dents to get acquainted. More 
importantly, students begin to 
realize how different they are 
and how much they can learn 
through sharing experiences. It 
holds true that many acquaint- 
ances develop into everlasting 
friendships because of common 
goals and/or concerns. As stu- 
dents strive to attain a quality 
education, they become well- 
rounded individuals because of 
initial contacts and interaction 
with a variety of people 

For example, many times stu- 
dents walk into a classroom dur- 
ing the first week of class and are 
asked to introduce themselves. 
As each student tunes into their 



classmate's informal introduction, 
many feel relieved to hear that 
there are others who have identi- 
cal fears, hopes, and aspirations. 
The initial interaction allows stu- 
dents to comfortably open up 
and gives them the confidence 
to participate actively in campus 
events, clubs, and organizations. 
As a result, students become flex- 
ible and more understanding of 
individual differences. This ac- 
ceptance allows for friendships to 
foster. By the end of every se- 
mester at Clarion University, stu- 
dents have a few more memories 
to store among their treasured 
things. 

-Dovie Powell 

-Page Design By James 
Dentel 





International students are in- 
trigued at the sport of basket- 
ball 

Sammy soaks up ttie rare tropi- 
cal rays of Clarion 



Student Life 



46 



WHERE WE COME FROM 




HONG KONG 7 
MALAYSIA 16 

CHINA 22 

NDIA 30 

INFORMATION FROM THE 
OTHER VICE PRESIDENT OF 

COUNTRIES 86 STUDENT AFFAIRS, 




L.oO Kreider catches an adminis- 
trator between classes. 

A new face captured at Ctian- 
dler Dining Hail 



Student Life 



47 



SPECTACLES: 



Amassed in a brilliant array of 
orange, yellow, green, and red, 
thousands of spectators gather 
yearly to take in the majesty and 
beauty of what is the Autumn 
Leaf Capital of the world: Clarion, 
For one week every year. Mother 
Nature is in the foreground, the 
center of attention, and she al- 
ways rises to the occassion. But, 
on that Sunday, as the tourists 
leave and the sun begins to fall, 
the Clarion University campus be- 
comes the canvas to a colorful, 
year long masterpiece 

The leaves pattern a rustic 
blanket filling in the spots of green 
as they loft to the ground. What is 
left by the leaves makes for a 
golden co^c*" •?' ■^'j'^'^ght, cast in 



The Colors of Clarion 

its own assorted pattern. This is 
the final touch in the 
Kaliedoscope. . Clarion, 

Suddenly, the breezes turn 
cooler and the leaves become 
fewer and a new blanket ap- 
pears a flake at a time. The snow 
fills the air, covers the trees, and 
layers the ground Everthing 
seems richer. The pines are 
greener, and the blues and grays 
of the sky appear crisper to the 
senses. Meticulously, each flake is 
placed with the love and caring 
of a new mother. The end result is 
a spread of pure white made 
with an illusion of simplicity. 

Then the breezes turn cooler 
and the spread is folded up and 
tucked away in a cloud for safe 



keeping, leaving behind it a new 
enriched field of green. With the 
warmer sun comes the spattering 
touches of violet, yellow, crimson, 
pink, blue or red at complete ran- 
dom on the flowers to make 
them as visually appealing as is 
their fragrance. Then , one day a 
year at dawn, like clockwork, na- 
ture knows that it is ready for an- 
other year spectacular display of 
color. 

And all alone in the midst of it all 
sits one heart, one soul, slowly 
pulling the white pedals from the 
yellow center asking, she loves 
me, she loves me not 

-David Allan Fry 

-Page Design By Wendy 
Wieland 



/ ,. 








f 



Plants even college students 
can't kill. 



Nature's Mirror, 



The Golden Arches have more 
than one meaning In Clarion, 



Student Life 



48 




The golden, autumn sun melts 
along Clarion's horizon. 

The beautifully dense vegitation 
disguises Clarion's campus. 

Though students complain 
about Clarion's winters, there's 
something exciting about the 
first November snowfall. 

As trees burst into brilliant 
shades of fall, downtown Clarion 
becomes a little warmer despite 
the cooling temperatures. 




3*>~**- 



Sharon Moore 



INTESTINAL FORTITUDE 



As The Stomach Churns 



Chandler Dining Hall lies at one 
of the highest spots on the CUP 
campus. Clinnbing higher and 
higher up the stairs leading to 
"Club Chandler", mouths begin 
to water in anticipation of a tasty 
meal. One never knows what lies 
beyond the ID machines until 
reading the infamous menu. 
Chandler's 67 employees dish out 
a whopping 45,000 meals per 
week. These meals are prepared 
using truckloads of food. Each 
day local warehouses deliver 
fresh fruits and vegetables. These 
45,000 meals consist of 2,600 
pounds of ketchup. Imagine a 
stack of hamburgers 88 feet high 
and a pile of buns 250 feet tall. 
You can imagine how much ham- 
burger goes into making some 
4,260 burgers every week. In ad- 
dition to those tasty burgers, 
about 2,000 hotdogs are eaten 
weekly by hungry CUP students. 

Imagine dishing out 8,000 ice 
cream cones each week and 
you see why the 67 employees 
can count on working an easy 40 
hour week. For breakfast, cooks 



fry up 27,500 eggs each week. 
Wash all that tasty food down 
with 26,300 glasses of milk and 
countless glasses of juice. 

Although Chandler is one of the 
smallest systems in the state. 
Food Services Director Mr. Ross 
Bell believes it is the best. "I've 
worked at several dining hall sys- 
tems thoughout Pennsylvania, 
and I truly believe that Chandler is 
the best." Mr. Bell, though he is 
new at Clarion, has a good rela- 
tionship with his employees. Many 
of them have been at Clarion for 
a long time. Head Chef Don Kline 
has been baking for 25 years. 

"Club Chandler" is known for its 
homemade pies, cakes and 
doughnuts. Named after Mr. Paul 
G. Chandler, the cafeteria is not 
only a place to get a good meal, 
it is a popular "scoping" place for 
CUP students, I'm sure it wll be a 
long time before any of us forget 
peanut butter soup and other 
memorable Chandler 

experiences. 

-Pat Glass 

-Page Design By Sharon Miller 



Jamie Bero, Resident Director of 
Wilkinson Hall, enjoys(?) dinner 
at ttie cafeteria with staff mem- 
bers. 

Regardless of wtiat ttiey're 
made of, tiot dogs accommo- 
date student budgets' well 




ALTERNATIVES; 



Taster's Choice 



Though Chandler offers a variety of 
foods to satisfy famished students, Ciarion 
is full of eating alternatives. To begin with, 
many students living off campus have 
only a partial meal plan or none at all. 
Their eating experience, can range from 
Delmonico steaks to Kraft's macaroni and 
cheese. Paul Soloski. who has lives off 
campus, can only soy. "Thank God for mi- 
crowaves," in relation to this topic 

If neither the Chandler menu or your 
own cupboard is enough to make you 
mouth drool, there is always the fast food 
option. Clarion's main street is lined with 



McDonald's, Kentucky Fried Chicken, Dun- 
kin' Donuts and Wendy's 
to name a few. Subs are a popular edible 
on every starving student's list and are 
available from Bob's Sub, Subway, and 
Four Star, No college town, however, is 
complete without pizza, and Clarion is no 
exception. Infamous pizzarias include 
Dominos, Four Star, Fox's, Pizza Hut, Pizza 
Pub, Collegio's, and Papa Jon's, Eating on 
the go may bring you to 7-1'1 for two 
hotdogs for 99 cents or Stop and Go's 
burritos for a quick filler upper. 

Regardless of the nature of the hunger, 
however, all students patronize the ever 



popular Eagle's Den, Clarion University's 
own restaurant. The social atmosphere 
and convenient location make this choice 
a Clarion favorite. 

There are few malnutritioned students 
on Clarion's campus. With the large vari- 
ety. Clarion can satisfy everyone's growl- 
ing stomach. In a town with more restau- 
rants than laundromats, it is no surprise 
that there ore fewer students with empty 
stomachs than there are with clean 
clothes. 

-Sharon Miller 

-Page Design By Sharon Miller 






Lunch Time 

College students who eat between 1 1 :30 
and 1:30 p.m. 



Chandler 45% 

Subway 25% 

Wendy's 12% 

McDonalds 8% 

Dominoes 7% 

Other 3% 



Confucious say: "No eat at caf- 
eteria tonight." 



Bye, bye. Miss American Pie. 



CHUCKLES: 



"laughter is the best medi- 
cine." "The most wasted day of 
all is that on which we have not 
laughed." If these statements are 
true. Keeling Health Center would 
be out of business. So just what is 
it that makes Clarion laugh? Or 
what is it at Clarion that makes us 
laugh? 

Think of the many kinds of 
laughter you hear. There's the 
nervous laughter you experience 
the first time you get up in front of 
your SCT 113 class, prepared to 
disclose your thoughts about why 
bananas aren't called "yellows" 
since oranges ore called "or- 
anges". Or that overly-hearty 
laugh at a really bad joke your 



What Makes Clarion Laugh 

scope tells, that confirms that you 
have the hots for this comedian. 

Even the embarrassed laughter 
that you feel obligated to par- 
take in when you do something 
really stupid like "dirtydancing" 
into the lightpost right in front of 
Nair. We laugh because we all do 
these dumb things; we protect 
our bruised egos with a chuckle. 

In thinking of all the laughter I 
hear and participate in, I realize 
that Clarion can be a pretty fun- 
ny place. I hear the "Freshman 
Giggle" from the girls next door, 
the sarcastic laughter of my 
friend as she tells me about her 
"exciting" evening, and then the 
laugh you hear when something 



seriously tickles your funny bone. 

So, when I remember some of 
the funniest things that have hap- 
pened since I arrived at Clarion- 
like the day Dr. Knickerbocker be- 
came "Kickerknockerbocker" 
due to linguistic goof-up or see- 
ing a friend dressed as a road for 
Halloween, complete with car 
accident, "dead" Barbie doll, 
and stop sign earrings, I realize 
just what it is... it's everthing and 
everyone that makes Clarion 
laugh. 

-MImi Benjamin 

-Page Design By Michael 
Dupree 



We really ARE sane! Honest! 

Follow your nose, .it always 
knows. 

What do you mean marriage 
VO! WHATSUP! 




Student Life 




est Manor. 

So Mr. Prof.,, you failed me 



Student Life 



53 



Hey, You Guise! 










Top 5 list not to do 
at CUP 

5: Students wiping 
out on Cardiac Hill. 

4: Walking out of 
Chandler's emer- 
gency doors, 

3: Changing your 
major senior year. 

2: - Fire drills that in- 
terupt "extra-cur- 
ricular" activities. 

1: Being caught 
walking on cam- 
pus with toilet pa- 
per hanging out 
you pants. 



POVERTY; 



The Desperate Search For Funds 



Find a penny, pick it up... silly su- 
perstition, or a true survival tech- 
nique? Few college students 
would pass that forlorn penny 
without considering whether or 
not to pick it up; some even 
make the neccessary glances 
from side to side to observe who 
may be watching as they stoop 
to pick up that priceless gem. 
Those in college are known to be 
among the poorest members of 
our population, but it is these cir- 
cumstances that have make 
them into the most creative find- 
ers of funds around. 

It all begins the first time you 
have to have pizza at 1:00 a.m., 
and you resort to your least fa- 
vorite kind because they "take 
checks". From then on it be- 
comes a vicious cycle, and one 
of the most intense culprits is our 
cravings. Those undeniable de- 
sires for cigarettes, junk food, and 
alcohol. Nicotene fits have sent 
my household spinning many 
times. The first thing searched is 



always the couches, then the 
floors, finally the pockets of all 
clothing articles are dug deeply 
into in the search for that lost and 
forgotten spare change. The only 
time the house comes close to 
being cleaned is when someone 
needs money. 

If this search does not prove 
fruitful, the interroommate bar- 
gaining begins: 

"I'll give you all of my Spaghet- 
tios for two quarters!" 

"I'll do the dishes all week if you 
give me your last two 
cigarettes." 

"I'll doyour laundry if I can have 
all the change I find." 

Creativity certainly does not 
end there, as Andy Tanner soys, 
"I've paid for many bills by having 
Heavy Metal Happy Hours." Not 
only do people resort to parties 
and poker games, but there are 
many drastic measures to be tak- 
en OS well. It is very common for a 
student to begin selling books in 
the middle of the semester, re- 



gardless of effect on grades 
when their check book begins tc 
ring those negative numbers. 

After that point, the situation 
becomes desperate and people 
may do things like cash in their 
Chandler Hall meal plan to secure 
themselves financially. David Alan 
Fry has the system down pat, 
"...simply ask everyone you know 
for a quarter for three days, and 
you've got it made!" 

Once these possibilities and 
similar ones have been exhaust- 
ed, those stricken by poverty are 
left in quite a spot. Unless, howev- 
er, they are among the few very 
select, very desperate students 
who will take that final step. They 
are the ones willing to make the 
ultimate submission to their finan- 
cial failure. These daring few are 
those who resort to picking up 
the phone and calling mom and 
dad. 

-Sharon Moore 
-Page Design By Michael 
Dupree 



i?**^' 






E^jpHBl B ^^^^^B 


w 


■-^^ 




JH. ^^^H[ 


w\. 





Not even enough for a candy Huddle closer for warnnth Do you accept lint for money'' 

bar. 



Student Life 



56 



Once an exam is over, stress is lifted off one's 
shoulder 



Many of CUP students agree that the major 
cause of stress is homework. 





Main symptoms and causes for stress 
among CUP students. 

Class conflicts (burnout) 30% 

Inadequate rest 17% 

Improper diet 16% 

Alcohol consumption 25% 

Interpersonal conflicts 8% 

Excessive personal commitments 4% 




This student uses the library to release 
stress 



^- Student Life 



STRESS: 



Bugging out. That's what the 
army calls it. Freaking out. That's 
what nnost of us recognize it as. 
Pigging out is my personal choice 
of an appropriate term. Each 
person has their own strategy or 
defense in dealing with the at- 
tack of enemy forces, or in simple 
terms... stress. The army retreats 
and regroups; college students 
react and rebuild. I myself and a 
few of my closer oinkers eat and 
re-eat. 

Stress, however, does not have 
to be a hair-pulling nightmare. 
Without tension in our life, there 
would be no challenge and no 



A Fractured State 



sense of accomplishment to 
gloat about. The higher the level 
of stress that you operate under, 
the bigger the pat on the back 
you con give yourself when 
you've make it through. You can 
never eliminate stress, you can 
only relieve it. 

It is important to deal with stress 
creatively and constructively so 
that it doesn't get you down. Stu- 
dents have mastered this lifestyle. 
What other group of people find 
enjoyment out of turning the vol- 
ume down on the TV set and 
making up their own dialogue? 
Creative ways of dealing with 
stress include: making your food 



talk before you eat it and trying 
on absolutely every article of 
clothing you own (and even 
some that you don't) before 
coming to a final decision. Road- 
trips are the ultimate escape 
from stress. Sometimes a change 
of scenery, be it the comforts of 
home or the calling of another 
state, is enough to put a new 
perspective on an old problem. 
Without stress, there would be 
no meaning in the word "relax- 
ation". Always remember:life was 
meant for ploying. 

-Terri McDonald 
-Page Design By James 
Dentel 




Student Life 



59 



MYSTERIES: 

The Unknown Clarion 



As a freshman, college begins 
from the time you orrive to the 
time you graduate. You asso- 
ciate every building and path 
and classroom with memories ac- 
cumulated over four years (or 
maybe five... or six?). Clarion Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania v^/as born 
in your mind the first day you set 
foot on campus. But, the antiqui- 
ty of many buildings on campus 
bring us back to reality and vje 
realize that the Clarion University 
that we know may not be all that 
it seems. 

Truthfully, Clarion students 
know little about Clarion Universi- 
ty's heritage and even less about 
the foundations that still haunt 
the campus. We've all heard the 
rumors about the ghosts in the 
Chapel, but how many of us can 
say we knew that the Chapel 
was built in 1902, originally held 
masses for students, and even 
housed a gymnasium in the base- 
ment? Not too many of us. In 
fact, the facts we know little 
about on our campus are some 
of the most intriguing. 

Take for instance Music Hall. 
Built in 1890, Music Hall is the old- 
est building on campus. Currently 
the President's residence, the 
building once housed the music 
department, later administrative 
offices, and was not used for his- 
torical and entertaining purposes 
until the employment of our cur- 
rent President. 

Founder's Hall, in another ex- 
ample, was once called "Old Sci- 
ence", as it was the science lab- 
oratory. The third floor of the 
building was once a dormitory 
and faces of the founders of the 
university were once carved in 
stone and spanned the arch over 
the entrance to the building. 

Those who reside in Becht Hall 
may be interested to know that 



your hall used to be called Na- 
varre Hall, after the region of the 
same name in Spain. Its pantile 
roof, Spanish gables and light- 
colored brick are similar to Span- 
ish architecture. The architects 
for the building, however, were 
from Pittsburgh, and the building 
was constructed in 1908 making 
it the oldest residence hall on 
campus. The front lobby of becht 
was formerly the campus dining 
hall, the president and his family 
ate with the students at the same 
time every day. Becht Hall is listed 
in the Pennsylvania Inventory of 
Historic Places. Surprised? 

All of us have visited Harvey Hall 
at sometime or another. But, did 
you know that in 1931 Harvey Hall 
was built as the main gymnasium 
on campus? All campus sports 
and physical education classes 
were held in this facility. Directly 
accross from Harvey, currently 
Peirce Science Building, was the 
football field and stadium. When 
the campus began expanding 
and plans were made to build 
Peirce, the college realized that 
they would hove to take over 
community neighborhoods to 
place the stadium near the cam- 
pus. Instead they decided to 
maintain their healthy campus- 
/community relationship and 
bought the Clarion County Fair- 
grounds, now our stadium. Amaz- 
ing isn't it. 

I guess it would be pretty hard 
to condense the entire history of 
Clarion's campus into one short 
page of yearbook space, but it's 
just something to think about. Of- 
ten the buildings and facilities we 
take for granted are four times 
our age and are monuments to 
those that worked hard to make 
our university what it is today. 

-Sharon Miller 

-Page Design By Sharon Miller 




Randy Janney 

Samantha Ross, a Resident As- 
sistant in Bechit Hall, is now part 
of ttie crew that keeps the 
place ship-shape. 



Student Life 



60 




student Life 



61 



TIME: 



Can You Spare It? 



Spare time- just what is spare 
time? Is it the ten minutes you 
have Petween your class in 
Founders and your class in 
Becker'' Is it the half an hour (or 
what seems like a half an hour!) 
you stand at the light on Main 
Street trying to get across to Still? 
Or is it the hour you have to kill 
Pefore your next meeting? Every- 
one defines it differently. Put ev- 
eryone has the desire for more of 
it 

What do you do in your spare 
time? Pretty good question, huh? 
"Sleep," is the singular phrase 
from the mouth of one sopho- 
more. My junior roommate says 
she worries in her spore time. As a 
senior, my response to the ques- 
tion of what I do with my spare 
time is. I never heard of it; I don't 
understand the concept! 

So, just what is there to do in 
Clarion University when you have 
spare time? You can hang out on 
the Penches in front of Carlson. 
You can take a nap in the liprory, 
or you can spend extra time 
scoping in the cafe. Doing laun- 
dry can kill lots of spare time, and 
talking on the phone is always an 
option. Letter writing, shopping, 
or gapping with your neighPors 
and friends con really fill your 
spare time. And studying? Well, I 
guess that's something you con 
do with your spare time. Put I can 
think of a million other ways to 
spend that time. 

-Mimi Benjamin 
-Page Design By Randy 
Janney 





student Life 



63 




$IQ,MA i.lb 



i-yi i: 



student Life 



64 



Hey, You Guise! 




Student Life 



65 



EPIDEMIC: 




The Flu Blues 



An estimated 25% of Clarion 
University students were strucl< by 
a flu epidemic during the final 
weeks of January. Many students 
were plagued with headaches, 
sore throats, and upset stom- 
achs. 

John Mough, a junior Marketing 
major, was one student who was 
bed-ridden for an entire week. 
Several days of asprin, cough syr- 
up, fluids, and plenty of rest 
turned out to be no vacation for 
Mough. "Every morning I woke up 



feeling like bricks were tied 
around my neck, " Mough said. 
"Besides that, my roommates 
kept bothering me." 

Sick students must also cope 
with a variety of other discom- 
forts that accommodate their ill- 
ness. These include: 
-A steady diet of soup, breakfast 
cereal, and fruit juice. 
-The constant desire to go back 
to bed. 

-A lack of quality morning televi- 
sion programs. 

-And finally, the inability to brush 
teeth, comb hair, or change 



clothes. 

Several students hoped that 
Dr. Bond would cancel classes un- 
til the crisis had passed. Derf 
Shade, a senior Communication 
major , was one of those stu- 
dents. Shade, who is an avid cof- 
fee drinker, commented that 
even his daily cups of Java 
weren't enough to ward off the 
flu. When he was asked about 
the perfect flu remedy. Shade 
simply replied, "Don't get sick." 

-Steve Cindrich 

-Page Design By Michael 
Dupree 








Flu Epidemic 

6 main symptoms 

Fever 28% 

Bodyaches 20% 

Headaches 18% 

Sore throat 12% 




1 










Cough 12% 

Decrease in appetite . . .7% 

35 to 40% of the student 
population had the flu. 



A couple little germs wipe out 
on entire classrooms 




66 



student Life 





Ir DO 



I died, and they forgot to bury 
me, 

Where's Mom when I need her? 

Is there a nurse in the house? 

Please... just let me live. 

There just aren't enough hours... 



JIACTITIONER 

6 TO 8 PM 






It never fails: ten loads of laundry 
and no working washers. 



Wish I could squeeze the Char- 
min now. 




PET PEEVES 

Trouble In Paradise 



PET PEEVES: Annoyances, quirks, 
and simple old pains in the neck. If 
there's one thing everyone has in 
common, it's a gripe. Mine is writ- 
ing introductions to stories that 
are self explanitory. 
Kim Kitsmiller; "Having to step 
over people laying in the 
hallway." 
Meredith McNichol: "Lack of pri- 
vacy when calling loved ones." 
Emily Sweetman: "Intolerant 

people." 
Steve Cindrich: "People who, 
once they're in their car, think 
they're Gods and don't have 
to obey traffic 
laws." 
Greg Goth: "'Telephone 

questionaires." 
Tara Fry: Tara's phone is discon- 
nected which created a big 
annoyance... the recorded op- 
erator's voice. 
Richard Poland: "All the damn fire 

drills." 
Robert Clowes: "When certain 
guys think they're God's gift to 
women and treat them 



poorly." 
Randy Janney: '"When room- 
mates leave tobacco spit filled 

bottles 

everywhere." 
Michelle Focht: "The bad rap the 

RA's get." 
Rhonda Kennemuth: "When that 

special someone is late 

calling." 
John Shuman: "Anybody with a 

space between their teeth." 
Kristi Miner: "Rudeness and 

inconsideration." 
Jodie Glenn: "People who talk 

and eat at the same time." 
Valerie Burkhart: "People who 

start rumors." 
Keith Brosius: "Stereo noise when 

you're studying." 
Sharon Miller: "When your roast- 
ed marshmallow falls into the 

fire." 
Wendy Wieland: "Meeting 

deadlines. 
Michelle Sinclair: "People sleeping 

in my room uninvited." 
Brian Stedina: "When you're 

awakened in the middle of a 



hot 

dream." 
Becky Moore: "Back stabbing. 

When people say things behind 

your 

back that they won't say to 

your face." 
Sonde Kuzio: "When men don't 

put the toilet seat down." 
Joe Rubinstein: "Too many fire 

drills." 
Jim Frey: "Roommates girlfriends 

who wake you up." 
Doug Bell: "When people spit on 

the floor." 
Mike Davis: "Too many rules." 
Terri McDonald: "When your hair 

blows in your face and gets 

stuck to your lipstick. 

• Phone Calls Made By David Fry 

and Steve Cindrich. 

Written By David Fry 

Page Design By Layout Staff 



Student Life 



68 




student Life 




Weekends are the only time it's 
easy to find o parking space^ 





MAKING TRACKS 



So tell me. ..isn't CAB's, Baskin 
Robbins, and all the cultural val- 
ues of, not one, but two movie 
theaters v^^ith the static ridden 
speakers enough to entice you 
to stay in Clairon on the week- 
end? NOOOOOOOl You have 
the gall and nerve to pack up 
and leave the entertainment 
mecca of Clarion to go to 
where? Only God knows. 

Autumn Leaf Capital of the 
world, fine, but for only one week 
a year. Clarion, in all its many 
splendors, is without question, the 
pack'em up and leave suitcase 
college capital, not only in this 
country, but in all countries with 



Getting Away From It All 



indoor plumbing. Niagra Falls, 
Seven Springs, a friend's house, 
Pittsburgh, Cook Forest, the tres- 
sel, or even to the comforting 
arm of your mother who you 
were insulting for being a nog 
over Christmas break are just 
some of the escapes from a Clari- 
on weekend. 

And just what fun, frolic, laughs, 
and memorable moments are 
you missing while away on your 
excursion? True that some week- 
ends ore madcap, crazy, and 
occassionally relaxing. Primarily, 
however, as the weather gets 
colder and the weeks get longer, 
parties, snowy Journeys, and or- 



dering fast food become the ma- 
jor source of excitement. After 
being on a first name basis with 
the Dominos man, gaining twenty 
pounds, making it unable to 
trudge through the deep snow to 
make a path to a party eight 
blocks away, you begin to plan 
your weekends in parts of the 
country less detrimental to your 
health. 

Don't get us wrong. Clarion is a 
nice place to visit, and even go 
to school, but living there is a dif- 
ferent story. 

-David Fry 

-Page Design By James 
Dentel 






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Student Life 



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student Life 



74 




h 



Hey, You Guise! 



r. 



?. 




Wendy Wieland 





Student Work Data 




Part-time jobs .16% 

Full-time 5% 

Work study . . .14% 
Non-working ..65% 



Student Life 



75 



DOUBLE AGENTS: 




A carefree trip to McDonald's is 
the perfect study breok for o 
weary student brain. Your bud- 
dies and you are starving and 
having scraped all your loose 
change and coupons together 
are treating yourselves to a din- 
ner out. You begin to drool as you 
place your big order. Nothing 
crosses your starving mind ex- 
cept your succulent McMeal. 
Suddenly, as the womam behind 
the register asks if that v/iii be a 
small, medium or large coke you 
freeze. This sudden panic is not 
due to the frustration of making 
this size descision on your soda, 
but because your thoughtless 
mind is forcing itself to place the 
familiar face in the McDonald's 



Students In Disguise 

ensemble. As beads of svveat 
form on your upper lip and you 
look to the floor to avoid this em- 
barrassing scene, she hands you 
your change and asks, "So how 
do you think you did on your Bio 
test?" Ah-ha! There is a God. 
She's your lab partner, and you 
did not recgnize her in her 
McOutfit. 

This is a common practice in a 
college town. Many students act 
as double agents, posing as stu- 
dents by day and Domino's Pizza 
delivery men or women by night. 
For many students, working while 
going to school has been a way 
of life since highschool. The differ- 
ence on the college scene, how- 
ever, is that the money that once 



was spent on movies and pizzas 
in highschool, is now spent on 
apartment rents, groceries, deo- 
dorant, bandaids, needles and 
thread... those neccesities in life 
that your mother always supplied 
free, now carry a price. And 
though the nagging landlords 
and constant inflation put quite a 
pinch on everyone's pocket, 
budgeting is just port of the col- 
lege experience. 

So when the Slurpee man at 
the 7-11 looks vaguely like the 
guy in your Art class, don't be sur- 
prised if he is. 007-1 1 may be one 
of you. 

-Sharon Miller 

-Page Design By James 
Dentel 





Mary Ann Joy and Mickey Brest 
take a minute out of their busy 
job to point out some bargains. 



HOMELESS: 



Stuck In Temporary Housing 



For many freshmen, anticipat- 
ing coming to Clarion for their first 
semester was a time of uncer- 
tainty. Accepted with no prob- 
lem, their schedules were set and 
their bags were packed, but 
where would they be living? Their 
housing card said temporary 
housing. What was temporary 
housing anyway? A tiny, cold 
damp room in the cellar of some 
old, abandoned building, no 
doubt, with the closest bathroom 
and shower half way across cam- 
pus? Would Clarion do that to 
you? 

Most people placed in tempo- 
rary housing found that the con- 
ditions were satifactory until a 
regular room emptied. Some 
even found out that they lucked 
out. Take for example the four 
girls who were placed in the 
guest rooms on the first floor in 
Campbell Hall. These rooms are 
the first two rooms down from the 
all male hall. This, of course, was a 
big plus when it came to their so- 
cial lives. They took part in every 
wing meetings and planned 
many interesting (and some very 
interesting) wing activities. Along 
with their great location, another 
plus was the way their rooms 
were designed. Complete with 
couches, private bathrooms and 
even a bath tub, it was like stay- 
ing at the Hilton, This is definitely a 
dream come true in the eyes of 



those used to dealing with the 
community showers in any normal 
residence hall situation. Ah, 
privacy! 

Other temporary housing units 
were set up in study rooms and 
TV lounges. Two guys, also 
Campbell residents, found them- 
selves sharing a TV lounge as their 
room. The walls of the room were 
lined with shelves, there were se- 
verval cushioned chairs and a 
coat rack was used for a closet. 
Since the room was meant as a 
lounge, its size was double that of 
any regular room. 

In Givan Hall, a few girls found 
themselves sharing an absolutely 
enormous room in the basement, 
previously a day core center for 
children. The room is fully carpet- 
ed and so big that there were 
eight beds. As students from that 
room were placed, those still liv- 
ing there made double beds out 
of the unoccupied furniture. 

Of course, about half way 
through the semester all of the 
students who were staying in 
temporary housing were in- 
formed that the university was 
working on finding permanent 
housing for each of them. Many 
of the students who started in 
temporary housing wanted to 
stay. 

-Stephanie Edel 
-Page Design By James 
Dentel 




Student Life 



78 




Maybe they'll give us beds someday. 
Don't mind us, we're just studying... 
This is MY kind of temporary housing! 




Temporary Housing 

Fall semester 1988 



Sept. 1st . ..125 people 

Oct. 6th 78 people 

Nov. 30th 31 people 

End of 1st semester. . .10 people 




Student Life 



79 



A picture is worth a ttiousand 
words. 




SHACKING: 



The 1980's saw not only the 
Reogon era, VCR's, compact 
discs, the return of psychedelia, 
and princess Di, but also the birth 
of the term "shocker". For the 
college student of the 80's, 
"shockers" come from every so- 
cial group, and "shack" for many 
reasons. 

Some people shock because 
the study candle grows dim and 
the road home is long, dark and 
chilly. Others shock because the 
party candle grows even dim- 
mer. Regardless of the reason, 
those all too familiar morning 
words, "Where am I?", are pre- 
dictably followed by "shh...not so 
loud " 

Some shock because they are 
visitors. It doesn't matter if you 
are the host here at Clarion, or 
the Clarion student visiting anoth- 
er campus The term is "university 



The College Slumber Party 

universal". There are those who 
shock with that "special some- 
one", and those who shack with 
just "someone". It doesn't really 
matter who you ore or who 
you're with. ..you are still a 
shocker. 

It would probably be easier to 
explain this whole "shack"-thing 
with a simple definition. A shocker 
is o person who stays of another 
person's place. Most likely, we 
con all attest to being o shocker 
at one time or another. 

If asked why you chose to 
shock, well, that's another story. 
The answers to the question ore 
endless. Stories range from ordi- 
nary to crazy to "the pictionory 
tournament that sow 3:30 o.m 
with 5 inches of snow outside that 
before we knew it, it wos 30 de- 
grees below." Be creative with 
your reason, but most likely, it's 
already been used. 



There ore a few discomforts 
about shacking, however. The 
roommate is always on obstacle 
to the shocker. If the roommate is 
"cool", they will suddenly feel the 
urge to watch David Lettermon, 
the late, late, movie, and Good 
Morning America- from the "Flin- 
stone couch in the TV lounge (just 
as long as you return the favor in 
the future). And for the off-com- 
pus shock, there is the dreaded 
trod home with the ottroctive 
"bedhead", in oil hopes that no 
one is awoke to see you. 

So you see, shacking touches 
all of us, mole or female, fresh- 
man to senior. Good and bod 
points condsidered, shacking is a 
big port of college life. So, I'll see 
you on the way home and, oh- 
.. .don't forget your toothbrush. 
-Julia Scheel and Kevin Wolf 
-Page Design By James 
Dentel 



Studer^t Life 



80 



The beginning of a iong waik 
liome with bedhead and squint- 
ing eyes. 




College lite behind closed 
doors. 



Contacts creates a problem 
from overnighters. 




Riemer services 
that are provided. 




• student 
Activities 

• Ticket Sales 

• Eagles Den 
Snack Bar 

• Games 

• Greek 
Services 

• Center Board 




Student Life 



82 



Hey You Guise! 




Page Design By James Dentel 






Student Life 



83 




U '^^ 



FOUNDATIONS: 



Clarion has truly changed from 
the quiet neighborhood commu- 
nity it once was to the exciting 
college town it is today. University 
expansions keep Clarion's cam- 
pus growing, the most recent ad- 
dition being the expansion of 
Riemer Center, 

Sue McMillan, Associate Direc- 
tor of Admissions, remembers 
when, as a child, her house was 
part of at least twenty homes on 
Payne Street. Where her child- 
hood home used to stand, now 
sevices 6,601 students as Riemer 
Student Activities Center. The 
flower gardens, forty foot birch 
trees, and open land that Sue 
played in during her school days. 



An .AHHifinp tn Onrion 

now serves as facilities for hun- 
dreds of students as Campbell 
Residence Hall, Marwick-Boyd 
Fine Arts Building, and Tippin 
Gymnasium. While it is hard for 
students to imagine their campus 
as someone's neighborhood or 
flower gardens, it is hard for Sue 
to believe the change in her pre- 
vious environment. 

With the advent of the Riemer 
expansion, even more of Clari- 
on's natural terrain will disappear. 
The addition includes fifty thou- 
sand square feet of building 
space comprised of roughly sixty 
rooms. The six million dollar pro- 
ject, due to be completed in the 
spring of 1991, will benefit the 



campus by bringing student or- 
ganizational offices together 
along with many student services 
into a convenience building for 
students. 

As the ground is broken for this 
rennovation, the old Payne Street 
neighborhood looks less and less 
recognizable. The building will not 
only serve as a symbol of Clarion's 
growth and prosperity, but also 
as a monument in memory of the 
Payne Street community for 
those who grew up there. 
-Crystal Standing 
and 
Sharon Miller 
-Page Design By James 
Dente! 





The location of Campbell Hall. 
now serving as home to hun- 
dreds of Clarion students, was 
once a single Payne Street resi- 
dence. 

The green grass of Riemer's hill 
will soon be transformed into 
new racquetball courts, dance 
rooms, and nautilus facilities. 




The Eagle's Den. The oasis for 
starving students, tired of Club 
Chandler cuisine. 

The Six Million Dollar Plan. These 
proposed changes will modern- 
ize Clarion's campus. 



CENTER 
BOARD 

Presents... 

Center Board is an administrative 
organization funded by the Clarion 
Student Association and designed 
to provide educational, entertain- 
ing, and recreational activities for 
the Clarion University campus com- 
munity. Dave Tomeo, Director of 
Student Activities, states, "Center 
Board strives to bring in the enter- 
tainment to CUP, and I hope that 
the student body enjoyed our activ- 
ities this year." The wide variety of 
entertainment that Center Board 
provides appeals to the kaleido- 
scope of student interests. 

-Wendy Wieland 

-Page Design By James Dentel 



September 14 
Maria Hanson on 
^Victirm's Rghts" 

September 15 

^^Solo Follies" w^h 

Larry Goldstein 

September 17 

Family Day 

Activities 

September 18 

"Good Morning 

Vietnam" 

September 27 

"The Chinese 

Magic Revue" 




This talented young woman 
stretcties tier abilities to give an 
outstanding performance 

"Thie Ctiinese Magic Revue" 
dazzled Clarion students Sep- 
tember 27. In Marvi'ick-Boyd Au- 
ditorium. 




Student Life 



86 




Judy Rhodes does her "Little 
Dickens" interpretations at the 
Chapel October, 25. 

Peter B. McMillan monitors a ta- 
ble during Activities Day. The 
event gives students a chance 
to examine and join campus or- 
ganizations. 




Center Board 




Performances ly/o 



Lectures 12%, 

Music Concerts 5o/o Special Events 40/0 



October 12 

The United States 

Marine Band 

October 9-16 

Alf Homecomlrg 

Week 

October 25 
^^A Little Dickens'' 
Interpretation by 

Judy Rhodes 

October 26 

Dr. Jean Kilbourne 

^7he Naked 

Truth: 

Advertising's 

Image of 

Women" 

November 9 

Dave Burgess on 

Classical Guitar 

November 16 

The 5th Annual 

Airband 

Competition 

November 29 

'The Nutcracker 

Suite" 

December 2 
'Biloxi Blues" 

December 10-11 
Madrigal Dinner 



student Life 



87 



January 22 
^la Bamba" 

January 29 
^^Dirty Dancing'' 

February 2-5 
Winter Carnival 

February 7 
Battle of the 
Bands 

February 12 
^^Cleopatra" 

February 17 
^^Dragnet" 

February 22 
"Visual Music" by 
Ron Pellegrino 

March 2 

The Albert McNeil 

Jubilee Singers 

March 5 
"Body Double" 

March 12 
"Chariots of Fire" 

March 19 
The New York 
Sextet 




A foriegn author presents his 
work to a Clarion audience, 

Maria Hanson speaks on victim's 
rights September 14 in Mar wick - 
Boyd Auditorium, 

Larry Goldstein presents "Solo 
Follies" September 15, in the 
Chapel. 




Student Life 



88 





The Madgrical Singers raise tlieir 
cups in a toast at ttie Madrigai 
Dinner in December. 

Tom Forsey wins the "Battle of 
the Bands" competition. 

The performance of "The Nut- 
cracl<er Ballet" helped Clarion 
students get into the Christmas 
spirit. 

Page Design By Wendy Wieland 



April 6 

"Jazz Dance 
Chicago" 

April 19 
The Spari<s- 
Chdffin Duo 

April 20-23, 27- 

30 

Festival of the 

Arts 

April 22 
C.A.B.'s outside 

April 25 
Eddie Money 
concert 

April 30 
"Weekly and 
Arganbright" 
Piano Concert 

May 6 8c 7 
Alumni Weekend 

May 9 

"Rocky Horror 
Picture Show" 

Every Saturday 

Night 

C.A.B/s dance 



student Life 



89 



REMINISCING: 

The End Of A Decade 

After four or five years at Clarion 
University, most of us will graduate 
leaving it seemingly the same as the 
day vje moved on campus and 
waved good-bye to mom, dad, 
and the station wagon our freshman 
year. Yet as each year goes by. 
Clarion experiences constant 
changes making the university what 
it has presently become. We have 
all seen these changes, some benifi- 
cial, others detrimental, some aca- 
demic, others social, some public, 
others personal. Regardless of the 
classicficotion, however, all of these 
changes moke an impact on Clari- 
on's campus and community. As we 
come to the close of the 1980 de- 
cade, we remember some of the 
changes, events, and people that 
have shaped our lives here at Clari- 
on University. 

-Sharon Miller 

-Page Design By Wendy Wieland 



September 11 1980 
Clarion University 
welcomes its new 
president. President 
Thomas Bond. 

September 11, 1980 
The Communications 
Department moves to 
Becker Hall 

September 11 1981 
Forty-five students are 
dissappointed when a 
their scheduled class 
"Vietnam: War and 
Peace" was 
cancelled due to the 
fact that it was not 
approved by the 
University before 
being off erred. 




Enrollment 
HIGHS and lows 




1988. 


.6601 


1987 . 


.6183 


1986 . 


.6112 


1981 . 


.5466 


1982 . 


.5461 


1983 . 


.5646 



In 1988, students said good-bye 
to Nair Beach and hello to more 
student parking 

Chuck Lizza catches Nair 
Beach's final sunbathers. 

Rare footage of the Clarion Ea- 
gle before hatching with his new 
look. 




Flags flew half moss in memory 
of Bob Barckoff, Susan Barber 
and James Griffith in 1987. 



Student Life 



90 



idPsnm. 




Clarion Call Photo File 




Clarion grieved the recent loss 
of a loyal friend, "Bucky". 

International Orange grociousiy 
bowed out in 1986, 

President Thomas Bond cele- 
brates his ninth year at Clarion, 



October 22, 1981 
President Bond agrees 
to teach a freshman 
earth science course. 

February A, 1982 
Riemer Student 
Center reopens its 
restaurant after 
rennovations. 

August 26, 1982 
Computer Science 
Department merges 
with the 
Communication 
Department. 

September 9, 1982 
Chandler Hill is chained 
to reduce traffic 
through campus. 

September 16, 1982 
President Bond 
prohibits rock concerts 
on campus due to 
vandalism at Marwick- 
Boyd Auditorium 
during the Donnie iris 
concert. 

September 23, 1982 
Becht Hall is reopened 
after rennovations. 

September 30, 1982 
The Handicap Care 
Standards Project 
results in campus 
alterations. 

February 17, 1983 
ID cards used as valid 
library cards in four 
surrounding 
community libraries. 



Student Life 



91 



February 24, 1983 
Academic Vice 
President Dana Still 
announces his 
retirement. 

March 10, 1983 

A fire guts a Jefferson 

Apartment. 

May 15, 1983 
Clarion State College 
graduates its last 
students. 

July 1, 1983 
Clarion State College 
makes the change to 
Clarion University of 
Pennsylvania. 

August 27, 1983 
Clarion Osteopathic 
Community Hospital 
opens to the Clarion 
area. 

November 7, 1985 
A university museum is 
established in 
Founders Hall. 

November 14, 1985 
Vietnam Veteran's 
memorial is dedicated 
in the town park. 

January 24, 1986 
Ground is broken for 
Clarion River Bridge. 

February 6, 1986 
Dr. George Curtis is 
named Vice President 
of Student Affairs. 




Clocion Call Photo File 



Construction on Ihe Clarion Riv- 
er Bridge is completed otter 
many detours. 

Early in the decade, students 
were elated at the resurfacing 
of the track. 

Founders Hall undergoes an in- 
tense reroofing project in 1988. 

Few of us remember the grand 
opening of our faithful food 
store. County market. 

Poge Design By Wendy Wieland 




Student Life 



92 




asm 

PUCOEHr 
SERVICES 




Clarion University felt the loss of 
admired and well acclolmmed 
artist Al Charley. 

The defendant in the case of 
Eric Knoticl<'s death is escorted 
from the courthouse. 

Coach Black retires after many 
successful years as Women's 
Basketball Coach. 

Career Services moves to a 
newly rennovated Egbert Hall, 
and Public Safety fills their seat 
after major remodeling in the 
Wilson Building. 



February 20, 1986 
Frank Lignelli retires as 
Athletic Director after 
twenty years. 

February 20, 1986 
C.A.B.'s is cancelled 
due to lacl< of 
sponsorship. 

jVlarch 20, 1986 
Clarion University 
Bookstore begins a 
video tape and VCR 
club. 

April 17, 1986 
Clarion University 
nursing program is 
accreditted. 

Spring 1987 
Gymnastics program 
cancelled at Clarion. 

December 31, 1987 
Forest Manor ends its 
university housing 
contract, 

December 8, 1988 
CUP students appear 
on The Donahue 
Show. 

February 2, 1989 
Bomb threats in the 
residence halls lead to 
the arrests of two 
university students. 

The above information 
has been make 
available thanks to 
The Clarion Call and 
was selected 
randomly from the 
Call's files. 



Student Ufe 



93 




Through rain or snow or sleet or hail, dedicated 
students moke their way to their early morning 
classes. 

Clarion's rural setting camoflouges acodemia 
enough for students to enjoy the campus with- 
out the constant reminders of classes. 





MICROSCOPE: 

A Detailed Study 

Academics, Though the scholastic part of college Is sometimes put on the back 
burner, we are all here primarily to get an education. Clarion University offers a 
well-rounded curriculum for every major on campus. The constant changes and 
improvements on campus keep Clarion up to it's level of academic excellence. 
Many times the academic section of a yearbook is skimmed over, ignored and 
unappreciated for the substance it stands for. Take a closer look this year, howev- 
er, and we think that you'll discover things that will surprise you. Academics are 
more than just pass or fail. 

-Section Editor, Maureen Freimuth 

-Section Design By .„_ ^ 

James Dentel - 

and 
Wendy Wieland 



S'^ 



u^K r 



r^^tr. 




1^^ 




Academics 



96 



A man is who he is because he 
believes in his pursuit and himself. Dr. 
Kenneth Mechling, Department 
Chairman for the Biology Depart- 
ment, shows he is that kind of man 
with great determination, dedica- 
tion and commitement,to life. In an 
interview with him, it was evident 
that he has been successful be- 
cause he believes in what he is do- 
ing but more importantly he be- 
lieves in who he is. 

A man with great honors and 
awards. Dr. Mechling has represent- 
ed Clarion University for 23 years as 
an instructor and has been depart- 
ment Chairman for the past eight 
years. Almost ten years ago he was 
nominated as a candidate for the 
Presidency of Clarion University by 
his colleagues. Through his efforts, 
he has brought almost 40 million dol- 
lars in grants to Clarion University 
and his department. He has invest- 
ed in building programs and re- 
search projects so that Clarion will 
be the best. Dr. Mechling has be- 
come a motivating and leadership 
force for Clarion University. 

To fully understand Dr. Mechling's 
dedication to our institution, one 
should ask what ore his future goals 
for Clarion. Dr. Mechling feels the 
goals are, "To provide Clarion with 
the kind of leadership and service 
that will make Clarion University one 
of Pennsylvannia's greatest Universi- 
ty's. We have outstanding potential 
and through good leadership by the 
University we can become a center 
of excellence not only in science 
education but in all we do." He feels 
that some of the greatest assets of 
Clarion University ore the quality of 
the faculty, the caring attitude 
shown toward students, and the 
small town practical atmostmos- 
phere. It is important to Dr. Mechling 
that students don't feel like a num- 
ber that can be lost in the shuffle. 
Teachers should care about what 
happens to their students. Mechling 
believes in the work that he is doing 



Dr. Kenneth Mechling 

and where our university is going. 
The education students receive at 
Clarion provide them with options 
which offer experiences and build 
bridges with the business industry, 
education industry, and govern- 
ment. Contacts with the industries 
and government will advise stu- 
dents to become the best they can 
be and how to get to where they 
want to go. 

Dr. Mechling's greatest satisfac- 
tion and what he is most proud of at 
Clarion is when he is complimented 
on his teaching and classroom lec- 
tures. Dr. Mechling comments that 
"When students ore interested in 
what I'm doing and what they're 
doing and my leadership helps ... It's 
like building the pieces to their fu- 
ture ... that feeling is the greatest 
satisfaction." 

How does one become a success 
like Dr. Mechling? After an interview 
with him, it would seem to come 
through example, leadership, dedi- 
cation, commitement and many 
hours of hard work. He is a man who 
has taken advantage of the oppor- 
tunities around him as well as taking 
the initiative to learn and grow 
through trial and error. When asked, 
"What motivates you?", he re- 
sponded that his personal motiva- 
tion is to be successful and to do his 
work well, because he takes pride in 
his work. He exclaims that "A per- 
son's reach should exceed their 
grasp." His work provides an exam- 
ple of leadership to students, col- 
leagues, and staff. As an instrutor. 
Dr. Mechling believes it is important 
to interact with students. When stu- 
dents submit reports. Dr. Mechling 
reads each and every report to see 
what students say and what stu- 
dents think. He stated clearly 
when he said, "I love to work. To 
accomplish things." He sees it like a 
'Project Big' because we keep 
reaching all the time into the future 
to be better and this is the driving 
force. He motivates others through 



example. He feels he has high ex- 
pectations for himself as well as oth- 
ers. Even on the worst days he will 
comtemplote if he wants another 
career and say "NO WAY!", be- 
cause he loves what he is doing and 
he loves the students. He thinks to 
himself that tommorow will be a 
better day. 

When you ore a man as success- 
ful and ambitious as Ken Mechling 
everyone wants a piece. Success 
lends to long days, long weekends, 
and thinking 24 hours a day. In the 
end arrives the feeling that the best 
has been done. Dr. Kenneth Mechl- 
ing has the desire to be outstanding 
in whatever he does and he wants 
to serve people to the best of his 
ability. This is what mokes Dr. Ken- 
neth Mechling such a great assest 
and resource to Clarion University. 
Without inidividuois such as him 
where would this university be. 

-Maureen Friemuth 
-Page Design By 
Wendy Wielond 



Academics 




H 



■.ill^^ ..-AW 




^"^^ 






Academics 




98 



A Man With Experience 

Greg Loscar 



Anyone who attends Clarion 
knows the name Greg Loscar... and 
that's with very good reason. Greg 
has been one of CUP's most promi- 
nent students for the entire four 
years he's attended this university. 

It all began in the fall of 1985, 
Greg's first semester freshman year. 
Little did he know when he saw a 
flyer advertising TV-5's organiza- 
tional meeting that he would even- 
tually become the executive pro- 
ducer and host of University 
Magazine. Now, he can always be 
found at the television station. Greg 
feel that the communication pro- 
gram at Clarion University is fantas- 
tic. He adds,"Especially the extra- 
curricular activities you can do with 
the media that make Clarion seem 
like a hidden treasure. There is so 
much opportunity here, I have got- 
ten to do some things that I never 
thought of doing." 

Greg's success isn't due to luck or 
being in the right place at the right 



time. He's earned his current position 
because of his own drive to be the 
best that he con be. Greg says that 
he sets for himself three rules that he 
tries to live by: "...determination to 
never give up; dedication to do the 
job right no matter how many hours, 
days or weeks it might take; and 
ambition to always keep setting 
more goals." 

Those ore the reasons Greg has 
gathered such a great amount of 
experience in his years at Clarion. His 
attitude is what makes him suc- 
ceed. Because of this attitude, 
Greg has traveled all over the coun- 
try with University Magazine. He has 
had his work shown at the Art Insti- 
tute of Pittsburgh. He has had the 
opportunity to do an internship with 
KDKA. He's even hod part-time work 
with KDKA since then. He's definitely 
go his foot in the door, but it's not 
due to anything other than his own 
frame of mind about success. 

As Greg himself said, you have to 



"give 150% to the thing you want to 
do to strive to make it the best." 
We hove no doubt that he will do 
just that. 

You may ask what the future 
holds for Greg Loscar, he metions,'1 
would like to graduate and find a 
job doing what I am doing now, but 
on a professional basis; producing 
and hosting. For ten years I would 
like to work on a program like Eve- 
ning Magazine in Pittsburgh ... trav- 
eling and meeting people. I think it is 
exciting. I hove been doing it for 
four years and haven't gotten sick 
of it yet. After 10 years, I would like 
to produce and host a show entitled 
Get Away. This would be a national- 
ly syndicated show focusing primari- 
ly on travel." 

We wish Greg the best of luck on 
all of his future endeavors. 

-Cindy Karpaw 

-Page Design By Wendy Wieland 



Academics 



99 



Looking into the future, ttiis stu- 
dent grasps her goals. 



Professors Back In The Classroom 




This student finds the clossroom quite an experience. 



I never realized how much worl< went into 
getting you PhD. In order to begin worl< you 
must take a test called "The G-mat", which is 
the equivalent to the S.AT.'s. After you have 
completed these tests and been accepted 
into graduate school, you begin the third 
stage of doctoral work. First there is the 
course work. I asked if the classes were hard. 
All of the people I interviewed said it wasn't 
difficult because you essentially build on 
what you know. Everything fits together in 
such a way that the end product is a pro- 
cess, not separate little parts. The second 
stage is your comprehensive examination. 
These are tests given to see how much you 
have learned. The third stage is writing your 
dissertation. Professors go to graduate 
schools for different reasons. For instance, 
Carol Anderson did it to prove to herself that 
she could do it. Anna Meodors said that to 
teach on a university level, It is becoming 
more and more a requirement. People inter- 
viewed said the course work helps their 
teaching because they were aware of the 
latest ideas In their field. In this way they can 
give their students the most recent informa- 
tion. The majority of the people told me that 
going back to school helped them under- 
stand what the students are going through. 
They experience the same frustration and 
pressure that their students do. Finally, I asked 
the people for a few words of wisdom for 
anyone wanting to get their own PhD, "You 
can do it, there's always a way. It just takes 
discipline and endurance." 

-Terri Wilson 



"The best way to learn is 
through experience, where 
one can discover their true 
capabilities." 

-Maureen Freimuth 




Hands On 



Experience 





Clarion University offers 
many opportunities for actual 
hands-on experience. For 
some majors, it's optional, but 
in most cases, students are re- 
quired to work outside of the 
classroom. The purpose is to 
better prepare Clarion stu- 
dents for "life in the real 
world." 

For example, optional ac- 
tivities are always offered to 
further students experiences 
no matter which major the 
student is involved in. Intern- 
ships, the student goes to a 
business or organization 
where he or she might work 
upon graduation. There the 
student observes, studies, and 
works with the people in- 
volved in the organization. In- 
dependent study programs, 
however, deal with research 
in the field the student wishes 
to pursue. This includes such 
activities as interviewing and 
observing people working in 
businesses which apply to the 
student's major. All of these 
activities count for credit to- 
ward graduation. 

Usually, however, students 
do not have the opportunity 
to choose whether they 
would like to do hands-on- 
work. It is just thrust upon them 
as a requirement. For exam- 
ple, all education majors are 
required to make observa- 
tional visits and take work- 
shops demonstrating literacy 



in audio-visual aids and take 
computer Itanguages, as well 
as student teaching their last 
semester. Library Science ma- 
jors are required to work in the 
library to graduate with their 
degree. Likewise, communi- 
cation majors must be in- 
volved at least one semester 
in a print media and one se- 
mester in broadcast medio. In 
addition, communication ma- 
jors hove an option for intern- 
ships. Music majors find them- 
selves with a variety of bands, 
choirs, and other organiza- 
tions to work for. Theatre ma- 
jors, of course, ore constantly 
working with plays, if they are 
not actually in the ploy. There 
are plenty of jobs that ac- 
company a play, from the 
construction of the set, props, 
and costumes to blocking the 
performance. Business majors, 
though not required but highly 
recommended, to partici- 
pate in the many business or- 
ganizations on campus or an 
internship with a corporation. 
Jobs with these organizations 
vary according to individual 
needs and concentrations, 
and they can also be used as 
optional activities for use on a 
resume for one's personal 
growth and learning, or for 
simply enjoyment of 
experience. 

-Cindy Korpow 

-Page Design By Wendy 
Wielond 



DR. MARY HARDWICK 



Recipe For Professor Extrodinoire 



Ingredients: 

2 tablespoons of hard work ethic 

1/3 cup of love 

1 pound of chopped personality 

A few thousand pinches of caring 

and humor 

Directions: 

With the hands of God, pour into 
room 163 Marwick-Boyd. Bake at a 
consumate professional level for 
five minutes. Take out of oven, let 
stand for 22 years and serve. 
Possible Results: Motivator, Educa- 
tor, Director... Dr. Mary Hardwick. 

Ask any student who has hod the 
Hardwick experience, especially 
any student of the theatre, and 
they will tell you, "She draws things 
out of me that I didn't know were 
there," or "I'm truly learning some- 
thing here." They will all tell you, 
however, that "...the woman is nut- 
tier than a fruitcake." 

Dr. Mary Hardwick was born in a 
mental institution in Cherokee, 
lowa,(the home of all great fruit- 
cakes). "My parents were perform- 
ing at the institution when I was 
born, my mother was playing the pi- 
ano and my father was playing the 
violin. I guess I took them by sur- 
prise!" So there you have it, ladies 
and gentlemen, the birth of a "sur- 
prise". This woman has been surpris- 
ing audiences for the last 22 years 
at Clarion University. Her produc- 
tions have been moving and inspir- 
ing, just as are all the intricate fibers 
of the lady affectionately known as 
Dr. Mary. 

She admits that entertainment of 
some sort was probably inbread in 
her. "My first role was Little Red Rid- 
ing Hood when I was four years old. 
My family was very musically in- 
clined, my father was the Chief 
Warrent Officer Band Director in 
World War II." Dr. Mary vividly re- 
called parts of her childhood while 
living in Omaha, Nebraska for 11 
years. "I was wild. I would get up 
early in the morning and walk up our 
road, over the hill, and down to the 



Missouri River. There I woud play for 
hours with Danny Dustin and Roy 
and Ralph Schifflebind. This just add- 
ed to my already hyperactive 
imagination. I would make up stories 
and then we would act them out. 
But even then, I was a director be- 
cause I would try to make their 
characters as I wanted them to 
be." 

That "hyperactive imagination" 
was with her wherever she went in- 
cluding her high school stage. Mak- 
ing up stories and pretending to be 
someone else were just a few things 
she did that she keeps incorporated 
in herself. Of course, she took these 
qualities to college along with a true 
willingness to learn. "I had some- 
thing going for me that most col- 
lege students didn't, and I don't 
mean to sound like I'm bragging, but 
I didn't complain about assignments 
and I never missed classes. Whenev- 
er I had many things expected of 
me, it just motivated me to work 
harder. I always had on insatiable 
curiosity and college helped that 
grow." 

With deep religious roots. Dr. Mary 
kept working in the theatre "...while 
God kept working through me", she 
added. Getting paid to act, she 
managed to earn her Ph.D. still only 
in her thirties. "My doctorial thesis 
was 'The Nature of the Black Hero", 
and it was probably the only time I 
was ahead of my time. When I was 
first called by Clarion to interview in 
1967, they thought I was black. They 
were probably trying to meet some 
quota, but they had a surprise when 
I showed up!" When she arrived in 
Clarion, the country was at the 
heighth of the civil rights movement 
and there was only one black stu- 
dent on the campus. "Her name 
was Connie and 1 sat next to her in 
church one day. I started talking to 
her and asked if she had a boy- 
friend. Well, she said she did and his 
name was George." With her deep 
love of sending a message through 
performance and with the state of 



the country, she asked Connie and 
George if they would be in her pro- 
duction of "In White America" by 
Martin Dubberman. "The piece is a 
compulation of works that reflect 
the black opinion in white america. 
None of it was original work. It was a 
very powerful performance and the 
campus literally went crazy over it. 
The pain of the blacks that was de- 
picted in the performance really 
made an impact on this campus. 
The impact on myself was that I was 
treated like I had done something 
wonderful, but what 1 remember 
most now is how I grew in respect of 
the black individual, after seeing 
their hardships. What really put the 
whole thing in perspective for me, 
however, was the day I was in my 
car with Connie and George and 
the announcement of Dr. Martin Lu- 
ther King's assasination was broad- 
casted. I've never seen such an ex- 
plosion of anger. 1 thought George 
was going to go through the 
windshield." 

With such clear memories of what 
truly are the dramatics of human 
life. Dr. Mary has been busy creating 
art on stage for the last 22 years. 
"My best works have been ~A Mid- 
summer's Night Dream' and 
"Ghosts'. The great writers allow us 
to enrich ourselves so much. I will 
never work with an inferior writer 
that doesn't understand the human 
spirit." 

On May 6, 1989, Dr. Mary Hard- 
wick recieved the Distinguished 
Faculty Award. "It's a great honor, 
but there is still so much I know that 
God wants me to give, and I will 
try." This is definitely a woman of 
great stature and we cannot begin 
to imagine the debts we owe her. 
Annie Yost, a student who worked 
with Dr. Mary, put it best when she 
said, "You can see God in every- 
thing she does". How true it is. ..how 
true it is. 

-David Fry 

-Page Design By James Dentel 



Academics 



102 




Academics 



103 



LOVE TO DANCE! 



Profile of on Actor: Rob Fix 



"Trust your professors and direc- 
tors. They know what they're do- 
ing." And Rob Fix should know, Rob is 
a senior theater major who has 
shown his natural acting ability time 
and time again on Clarion's 
campus. 

Robert Charles Fix, 21 started his 
acting career at Blue Ridge High 
School in Hallstead, Pennsylvania. "It 
was a really small school. Ninety- 
two people graduated from my 
class." There, Rob acted in "The 
Fantastics" and several acting 
revues. 

When he started in Clarion, Rob 
became actively involved in the 
theater department. He performed 
in such plays as "Fiddler on the 
Roof", "Cabaret", "Chorus Line", 
"Equus", "Ah, Wilderness", which 
won him the Silverfox Comedy 
Award for Outstanding Acting, and 
"Do Black Patten Leather Shoes 
Really Reflect Up?". This was Rob's 
favorite production to dote. "I love 
the storyline. There is nothing quite 
like it." 

Even though most of his college 
life is spent at rehearsals, Rob is in- 
volved in several co-curricular ac- 
tivities. He is a member of both Al- 
pha Psi Omega and Phi Eta Sigma, 
he performs with the Show Choir 
and Choir, and he is currently pro- 
ducing, directing and acting in his 
version of "Burn This", which is his 
favorite play. 

Rob has taken several courses in 
Clarion which has helped boost his 
knowledge of the theater. "I have 
taken voice and articulation 
courses, acting and speech classes, 
dance classes, and a backstage- 
/technical course. I think that this 
course helped me in many ways. I 
realized just how many things go on 
behind the scenes to make the ac- 
tors look good and the play run 
smoothly." 

Rob was inspired to the stage by 
the small screen. "I love to watch 
musicals on television. When "The 
Sound of Music" comes on, I will sit 



and watch every move and listen to 
every note with admiration." Rob's 
inspirations are Dustin Hoffman and 
Meryl Streep. "I love to watch them 
work because they use character- 
ization. They analyze their charac- 
ter and then use that to make it so 
real to watch." 

Rob describes himself in three 
stages: in the post, the present, and 
in the future. "I think in the post, live 
in the present, but never plan for the 
future. I think that the past is very 
reliable. I can pull strengths and 
valuable experiences from it. I am 
excited about the present. There 
ore so many new experiences I en- 
counter. I am eager about the fu- 
ture. Just think of the possibilities!" 

When he graduates this May with 
a degree in Speech and Theater 
and a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree 
in Acting, Rob will be in the cast for 
the theater company Lost Colony in 
North Carolina. "I will be performing 
in the history of Roanoke Island." 
Rob's plans for the future include 
traveling around the country and 
performing for different companies. 
Eventually, Rob will return to college 
to get his masters. "I don't see my- 
self being settled down. I will be 
bouncing around the country trying 
to pay my bills and living with my 
dog." 

Rob's future goals consist of per- 
forming on a Broadway stage, "but 
not in New York. I would like to per- 
form in "Anything Goes" or anything 
that includes singing and/or danc- 
ing. I find more excitement in being 
in the chorus than having a lead 
role, although, the lead is nice too. 
Most people refuse to perform in a 
production unless they have the 
lead. I love the chorus because I 
have the chance to sing and dance 
and enjoy myself." 

After spending four years in Clari- 
on, Rob has both positive and nega- 
tive views about the campus. "Clar- 
ion offers a very well-rounded 
education. The general education 
courses that we ore 'forced' to take 



are very interesting to me. I think my 
favorite elective was Biology. I 
don't, however, think that Clarion 
offers appropriate facilities for 
dance classes. We have a very lim- 
ited area to practice." 

Rob has a lot of useful advice for 
the aspiring theater majors on our 
campus. "Don't limit yourself to one 
area in the field. Always audition for 
everything. You have to keep try- 
ing. There are a million people out in 
the world who con hire you, and at 
least one person out there who will 
like your work. Don't procrastinate 
when it comes to activities on cam- 
pus. Get involved. I guarantee that 
you'll have a lot of fun." 

-Patti Magness 
-Page Design By 
Wendy Wieland 



Academics 



104 



1 ■' * %^^ 




I _*«>■ 



Academics 



i vHifif 



105 



What are our professors 
doing? 

, Beconiing Distinguished 



You might have heard the rumor 
that sometimes circulates on Clari- 
on's campus. It is omazing that peo- 
ple still entertain the idea and that 
there are enough people to keep it 
alive. Imagine believing that all Clar- 
ion professors do is teach! The Clari- 
on University Faculty are involved on 
this campus and W\ih the communi- 
ty. They advise, research, help, 
write, publish, organize, and sup- 
port. It is time for the unbelievers to 
stop spreading those ugly rumors. It 
is time to recognize our own profes- 
sors for their accomplishments and 
the hard work and dedication that 
goes with it. 

For example. Dr. Phyllis W. Smith, 
professor of Education has been se- 
lected as one of the readers and 
judges for the "Leaders of Readers" 
program, which is sponsored by the 
International Reading Association in 
coordination with "Faculty Circle 
Magazine and the Council for Peri- 
odical Distributors Association". This 
program recognizes that local 
reading programs make a major im- 
pact on the nation's illiteracy crisis 
and promotes their recognition. 

Donna Oliver, on assitant profes- 
sor of Science Education, is the win- 
ner of the prestigious Pennsylvania 
Science Teachers Association 
(PSTA) Fellows Award. Past presi- 
dent of PSTA and a current director, 
Oliver is also director of the Regional 
Computer Resource Center (RCRC) 
at Clarion. 

Two of the Fellows awards ore 
presented each year by PSTA to 
teachers who have helped science 
education throughout Pennsylvania 
and also demonstrated service and 
education to PSTA. The PA STEP, 
ITEC, and RCRC programs initiated 
in the past five years have become 
role models for the state and nation. 
"Our programs ore the shining stars 
in the nation," states Oliver. "There 
are no other programs in the United 
States that have that impact like 
ours", adds Ms. Oliver. 

Nancy Sayre's doctoral study was 
a case of sink or swim. Soyre, a pro- 
fessor of Education, received her 



PhD. from the University of Pittsburgh 
during the summer. Her dissertation 
was A Descriptive Studv of the 
Swimming Reflex on Water Adjust- 
ment and Distance Covered on 
Water on 23 to 25 month-old 
children. 

Sayre's study investigated the 
swimming actions of the foot and 
leg during the first 150 days of the 
infant's life and what effect this 
practice had on the development 
of the voluntary swimming behavior. 
Her subject group came from chil- 
dren as young as ten days old. The 
school of Science Pedagogary in 
Russia also provided her with step- 
by-step instructions of their 
program. 

Sayre's research was funded by 
the University's School of Education, 
She has to submit the results of her 
study to the American Alliance for 
Health, Physical Education, Dance 
and Recreation this year to Boston. 
Dr. Mohammed I. Khan, professor 
of History here at Clarion, participat- 
ed in the 20th annuo! Conference of 
the Consultive committee of Indian 
Muslims in the United States and 
Canada at Northeastern Illinois Uni- 
versity in Chicago. The theme of the 
conference was "Human Rights Vio- 
lations in India". Khan was also a 
member of the panel to discuss 
"Strategies of the Minorities for the 
Future." 

Dr. Chandra K. Khan, assistant 
professor of History also, chaired the 
panel at the 17th annual meeting of 
the Mid-Atlantic Pegron/Associa- 
tion for Asian Studies, Inc. at Indiana 
University of Pennsylvania. She will 
present a paper on "The India Com- 
pany's Trade with Ching China." 

These are several of the many of 
our distinguished faculty, so the next 
time you hear someone say "All 
Clarion professors do is teach", you 
will be armed with the fact. What 
our professors do outside of the 
classroom directly influences what 
they do inside the classroom. 
-Terri McDonald 
-Page Design By Wendy Wieland 




staff Photogfophef 



A faculty member takes time 
out to share their thoughts on 
the opportunities available at 
Clarion. 



Nfik. 




I iMlim^j^g 



Students Who Get Ahead 




Many students have wondered 
across campus blinded by the fact 
that within our University there are 
many opportunities available that 
make a difference in our lives. For 
many incoming freshman it is the 
educational opportunity that will 
make a difference in their lives. Edu- 
cational Opportunities Program Act 
101 (E.O.P.) is a program designed 
for students struggling academical- 
ly. Approximately 50 students enter 
a summer start program, they are 
not accepted for fall enrollment un- 
til they have successfully completed 
the summer program. The summer 
start students work closely with a 
peer advisor who works with them 
personally and acedemically. 

The students who come through 
this program have the opportunity 
to get ahead of those starting in the 
fall. It's an easier transition for the 
E.O.P students because they have 
had the opportunity to adust in an 
even smaller atmosphere. 

-Maureen Freimuth 



E.O.P. director. Dr. Isaiah Sessoms, with a student who is 
taking the opportunities offered at Clarion. 




"Clarion has been sighted as 
a model program of excel- 
lence and that is our focus. Ac- 
ademic Excellence." -Dr. Isaiah 
Sessoms 




Academics 



108 



Andor Papaosi-Jobb 



Andor Papaosi-Jobb an associate 
professor of art at Clarion. He was 
born in tine little town of Papaosi in 
East Hungary. However, he shortens 
his name to P-Jobb because it is 
easier to soy. Shortly after he was 
born he moved to Budapest, Hun- 
gary where he grew up and went to 
the Art Academy. At the age of 22 
he left Hungary and came to Ameri- 
ca. In America he studied at several 
universities such as Penn State, Case 
Western, Kent State and California 
State in Los Angeles. In addition to 
schools in Amercia, he has visited 
and studied in England, Holland, 
Canada, Belgium, West Germany, 
Austria, France, Czechoslovakia, 
Romania, and Hungary. But for the 
last 27 years has be teaching at 
Clarion. 

As an associate professor of art 
he teaches classes in drawing, 
sculpture, crafts, art history, etc . . . 
but he also teaches classes in Judo 
and Yoga for the Continuing Educa- 
tion Department. Presently Mr. P- 
Jobb is working on his 4th degree 
Black Belt in Japanesee Judo. His 
philosophy as teacher is "do as I do 
not just because I say so." He feels 
that he must practice what he 
teaches and he does. So in addition 
to his Judo, P-Jobb is an accom- 
plished painter, sculptor, craftsman. 



and print maker. He is such a varied 
artist that there are not many medi- 
ums he does not work with and the 
art work that he completes, he then 
sells. He most definitely practices 
what he teaches. In addition, P- 
Jobb feels that the greatest quality 
a teacher has is to be compassion- 
ate, understanding, and able to re- 
late to the needs of the students. He 
feels he must deal with students on 
an equal level. Not a lower level 
that the teacher must come down 
to. A teacher should lift a student to 
his level through this comes respect 
and equality, 

P-Jobb has the credibility to work 
at larger universities, but he says he 
he likes Clarion because of the close 
knit community here. He wants to 
meet the students as freshman and 
help them to learn. He also finds 
Clarion a healthy place which is im- 
portant to him. He is proud of his 
health and finds that the pollution 
found through out this country dis- 
turbing. P-Jobb is also very proud of 
being American citizen and be- 
cause of this he shows interest in the 
pollution problems. 

This year has been a good year 
for P-Jobb. He has recently traveled 
to Canada where he has given 
some well received presentations 
on his research into Scythian Art and 



the Tamano Law, Working together 
with Dr. Vamos-Toth Bator of Hono- 
lulu, Hawaii, they hove shown a rela- 
tionship between the pre-Greek an- 
cient Eurasian Scythian Art and the 
auxiliary science, Tamana Law 
founded by Dr. Bator. Presently they 
are working together to travel to 
Europe, where they will deepen 
their research, make several pre- 
sentations on thier research, and fi- 
nalize the script for a book they 
hope to publish. In addition to his 
research, P-Jobb would like to intro- 
duce computer art to Clarion. P- 
Jobb feels that the only thing hold- 
ing back Clarion is a lack of money 
to research and experiment. 
Teachers need to be in touch with 
life. Teachers need to find new 
ideas and explore them. He also 
thinks that just because Clarion is a 
smaller school it should not turn its 
back on such ideas. 

As a final quote he said, "art is 
basic to human communication. It is 
a human created process which 
should be well done and at once 
should benefit the artist as well as 
humanity." 

-Michael Dupree 

-Page Design By James Dentel 



Academics 



109 




Academics 



110 



Pamela Twigg, a Russian- 
/French double major from 
Cumberland, Maryland, has 
won the Rotary International 
Scholarship, This scholarship 
entitles Miss Twigg to travel to 
Besancon, France to continue 
her studies abroad. Receiving 
the announcement of her 
achievement, Pamela Twigg 
states, "I became confused. 
There were so many things to 
do and I didn't know where to 
begin!" This 22 year old schol- 
ar will be receiving a certifi- 
cate of a year studies in inter- 
cultural studies/man in society 
at University of Franche- 
comt'e. Miss Twigg chose 
Franche-comt'e because of 
it's French taught classes and 
to help her achieve her goal 
of becoming a lawyer. 

Advisied by Dr. Ainsworth, 
Miss Twigg began the scholar- 
ship application process in 
the 1987-1988 academic 
year. She was required to 
complete her university appli- 
cation booklet in French, 
which included three long es- 
says. "The essays were hard 
because I had to find ways to 
express myself in French." 
added Pamela. With twelve 
other competitors, Ms, Twigg 
had to pass through a series of 
interviews at a number of lo- 
cal Rotorary Clubs in the 
Western Pennsylvania area. 
The interviews were conduct- 
ed to discover the intentions 
of the candidates, their per- 
sonalities, and their ability to 
present themselves. The Ro- 



Pamela Twigg 

An International Scholar 

tract Club had to assure 
themselves that the individual 
they supported would make a 
good ambassador from the 
United States, Once a candi- 
date was selected, they must 
follow certain rules of conduct 
concerning political views 
and ideas. The selection pro- 
cess came to a close when 
Pamela was awarded the Ro- 
toract International Scholar- 
ship to further her French stud- 
ies in Europe. 

To prepare herself for the 
experiences of France before 
she leaves, Pamela will be un- 
dergoing intensive French 
studies in the French speaking 
province of Quebec, Cana- 
da. "I can't wait to bicycle all 
over the place and practice 
my French", Pamela excitedly 
mentions. Pamela will be tak- 
ing classes at the Quebec Uni- 
versity for several weeks. In 
addition. Miss Twigg has been 
appearing at Rotoract Clubs 
in the area to explain her 
preparation for her studies. 

Miss Twigg was under close 
scrutiny by the Rotoract Club, 
but she deservedly won her 
scholarship. Her accomplish- 
ments are very impressive in- 
cluding her coop with the 
United States Government's 
Department of Defense in an 
intensive Russian program at 
Fort Meade, Maryland. Pame- 
la, as she discussed her feel- 
ings while she was at the De- 
fense Department, stated, 
"It's just that so much goes on 
and felt so little. It was a neat 



feeling to know I was a part of 
it; like the first day on a col- 
lege campus as a freshman 
student". Pamela feels that 
her experiences with the De- 
fense Department has helped 
her immensely with her Rus- 
sian, but will also help her with 
her role as an ambassador. 

When asked about Clarion, 
Pamela adds that the people 
where friendly, that she al- 
ways received a nice feeling 
about the community. On the 
day Pam left for Canada, I 
witnessed a crowd of very 
close friends shedding a few 
tears. Though her presence 
will be missed, those tears 
were also excited for Pame- 
la's new adventures. To start 
her adventures. Miss Twigg will 
be married in Amsterdam, Hol- 
land early in the summer. Her 
fiance', Andreas Koch, is a na- 
tive of Holland and a Clarion 
graduate. Together they will 
explore Pamela's new educa- 
tional horizons. We wish her 
the best of luck, 

-Wendy Wieland 

-Page design by Wendy 
Wieland 



Academics 



111 



Pamela Twigg prepares herself 
to study in France to receive a 
certificate in ttie study of man 
and culture 



Questions to ask yourself... 




•Why should I study abroad? 
*How will studying abroad help my 

future careers and goals? 
•Will I be able to transfer my credit 

earned overseas to U.S. college? 
'What are the different study 

abroad programs available? 
'What resources are available to 

help me to decide what, where, 

and when to study abroad? 
'What suits my interest of futhering 

my education out of the United 

States? 
•WHY NOT??? 



Gopol K. Jyer chiose to study abroad in ttie United States. 



I 




"Not only did I learn 
a lot, but I had the op- 
portunity to become 
more aware of what 
the world has to offer." 
Ed Donovan 




The Risk of Adventure 



Studying Abroad 



An opportunity that can't be 
passed up: the opportunity to study 
abroad. Clarion University's Interna- 
tional Programs sends both students 
and faculty abroad through grants, 
scholarships or aid. What does it re- 
quire? The first step is your initiative. 
Taking the initiative to find out what 
its really about, v*/hat opportunities 
are available, and how can you 
make it happen. Many students 
have it set in their minds that going 
to college in another country is ab- 
solutely impossible for many reasons 
such as: expenses, language barri- 
er, acedemics, and a change in cul- 
ture. What students aren't aware of 
is that they may be the perfect 
canidate to travel to another uni- 
versity to educate themselves. Their 
horrifying concerns about the ad- 
venture they thought they had real- 
ly aren't that bad after all. Anyone 
can study abroad. It is not neces- 
sary to be the perfect student but a 
more flexible, easy going person in- 
terested in LEARNING. 

Next, you must research Universi- 
ties and countries to really discover 
what you want when you're study- 
ing abroad and which schools meet 
your needs. International Student 
Exchange Program (I.S.E.P.) at Clari- 
on offers over 100 institutions to ex- 
plore and attend. These institutions 
should be choosen to accomodate 
your needs according to language, 
housing, academics, expenses, aid, 
and culture. How can anyone afford 
to study abroad? A good question, 
because many are fortunate and 
receive scholarships, others receive 
grants and some use their own aides 
(grants and loans that are used to 
go to school during the acedemic 
year). The greatest part about this 
program is the fact that you are 



paying Clarion's tuition and housing 
fees. The expenses for the University 
you attend could be doubled Clari- 
on's price. If there's a will there is 
ALWAYS a way. 

The language barrier is always a 
concern addressed by many inter- 
ested students. It isn't always nec- 
essary to know the language of the 
country when you study abroad. 
There are 45 institutions through the 
I.S.E.P. program that are English 
speaking and teaching institution in 
20 different countries. This also gives 
you the chance to become bilin- 
gual without the pressure in the 
classroom as well as being a learn- 
ing experience. 

How long do you study? There are 
a variety of options available rang- 
ing to 3-5 week seminars offered in 
the summer and winter, interships 
(summer or semester), one aca- 
demic semester or one academic 
year. The full academic year is en- 
couraged because just as you 
adapt and come out of culture 
shock its time to go. The full year 
gives you the opportunity to have a 
successful visit. 

Academically, many educational 
programs differ from ours. This infor- 
mation can be discovered when 
you are doing you research. Making 
sure you can survive their system is 
important. Most classes consist of 
lectures with oral examinations, in- 
dependent work outside of class, 
small group discussions, and classes. 
Each institution is listed and a profile 
is given to explain and discribe the 
institution. 

Remember that I.E.S.P. has many 
programs to offer to suit your indi- 
vidual needs. 

-Maureen Freimuth 

-Page Design By Wendy Wieland 



Experienced and Motivated 

...Dr. Phylis Smith 



After two insightful interviews with 
Dr. Phylis Smith of the Education De- 
partment, I grew to admire and re- 
spect the qualities she possesses as 
a woman and educator. Dr. Smith 
emphasized her view of life as on 
opportunity, and our duty as individ- 
uals to take charge of our lives and 
seek out the opportunity. She is a 
woman willing to risk, she is not 
afraid, but eager to learn about 
who she is and what she wants to 
get out of life. In an interview she 
stated, "I love living ... I love my 
job. ..I love people". She is happy 
and successful because of her inter- 
est and willingness to learn more 
about life, people, and herself. A 
professional well respected by both 
students and colleagues. Dr. Smith 
has had the confidence to become 
one of Clarions most outstanding 
faculty members. Her genuine con- 



cern for tomorrow's future is demon- 
stated in the classroom. 

She emerges her students to learn 
in more than one way, 
her philosophy includes the idea 
that, "...teaching somebody is get- 
ting them motivated to know. You 
don't do it by forcing it down their 
throats; you do it by motivating 
them to want to know the same 
things. You have to be able to sell 
the information to them." 

Dr. Smith has contributed "...21 
wonderful years" to the university 
and has a great deal to be proud 
of. This year she was recognized as 
a Distinguished Faculty Member 
(1988-1989). In 1967 she was on the 
committee for finding the Reading 
Graduate Program and has contin- 
ued inputting support since its be- 
ginning. "It incredible how much 
there is to do in a life time." Dr. Smith 



adds. She has experienced what life 
has to give and plans to continue 
exploring more of life's offerings af- 
ter retirement. She described herself 
as a person "motivated to do a 
1000 things". She has always been 
motivated since she was a young 
girl when she hod her first job. 

She has truly proved whot it takes 
to be one of the best. I hod heard 
rumors that she was feared and in- 
timidating, so when I asked about 
this she responded, "I don't want to 
be feared, but I want them to work 
and learn now. ..when students 
come into a course they're going to 
work, but thats what life is all 
about." She is a woman who has 
learned through experience. It is dif- 
ficult to find something Dr. Smith 
hasn't experienced or doesn't like. 

-Maureen Freimuth 

-Page Design By Wendy Wieland 



Academics 



114 




Academics 



115 



student Teaching 



I recently completed my student 
teaching experience in the Clarion 
Area School District as a music and 
French teacher. As a double major, I 
spent four and a half years prepar- 
ing for what I considered the ulti- 
mate test of my abilities in my cho- 
sen fields. Like most new student 
teachers, I began my semester full 
of enthusiasm, short on confidence, 
filled with pre-conceived expecta- 
tions and lacking in the experience 
of a seasoned teacher. I started my 
first day of student teaching fearing 
that my co-ops would inundate me 
with impossible tasks, my supervisors 
would bury me with paperwork, and 
the students would find a weakness 
and torture me for the entire semes- 
ter. The day turned out to be one of 
introduction and observation. At 
first this seemed scary but I soon 
grew accustomed to the students 
and my duties. 

I found myself juggling an unusual 
schedule at school with music in the 
morning and French in the after- 
noon, as well as attending rehears- 
als and performances which are 
part of my music duties. On the 
whole, I was used to having a solidly 
packed day even when I was at the 
university. What I wasn't accus- 
tomed to was the mental prepara- 
tion and endurance I needed as a 
teacher. On top of all this, I was still a 
member of the university Symphonic 
Band, secretary of the Band Frater- 
nity, and taking an independent 
study class in French Literature. As I 
look back on it all, I wonder how I 
managed. I did eventually adjust to 
this new situation and was enjoying 
it very much. Just when I thought my 
daily schedule was set, along came 
mid-semester when music educa- 
tion majors must switch from the 
high school to the elementary 
school. At the elementary school, I 
taught lessons until noon when I 
would spend twenty minutes walk 



Brian Henry 

back to the high school to teach 
French. Initially I found myself using 
my time between arriving at the 
high school and my first French class 
to mentally prepare myself for the 
remainder of the day. As the semes- 
ter progressed I discovered I could 
prepare myself in less time and use 
some of my extra time to grab a bit 
of junk food to sustain me for the 
rest of the day. 

I suppose what really got me 
through all this was my respect for 
my co-ops and my fondness for the 
students with whom I worked. The 
support and constructive criticism I 
received from my co-ops, along 
with learning from the examples, 
became my guide to keep me go- 
ing in the right direction. The doily 
exhilaration of working with students 
and helping them to discover what 
they could accomplish individually 
and together became the "'fuel" 
which enabled me to endure a day 
that usually ran non-stop from 6:30 
am to 12:00 midnight. Specific 
events are difficult to remember at 
times, but selecting a few of the 
best is not a hard task at all. 

My worst experience occured 
one afternoon when the high school 
bond director was away and I was 
required to rehearse the senior high 
bond. I did not work often with them 
because I normaly had a French 
class that period. 

Eighty high school students in a 
tightly-pocked room on a Friday af- 
ternoon and armed with instruments 
capable of producing enough noise 
to drown out a New York City rush 
hour traffic jam. This is a prime de- 
scription of a potential discipline 
problem if ever I saw one. At one 
point in the rehearsal I lost my cool 
and on unplanned explicative es- 
caped my mouth. The silence was 
more deafening than the reheorsoL 
It was rather amazing that the some 
students who couldn't hear me give 



instructions were suddenly able to 
catch this. To moke things worse the 
vice principal was standing at the 
doorway. Needless to say, when my 
co-op returned the following Mon- 
day, I was strongly advised to keep 
a tighter reign on my vocabulary 
during future rehearsals. 

The nicer port of my stay over- 
shadowed all the bad experiences 
put together. The triumph of the 
Clarion Singers, a vocal ensemble of 
45 students performing pop-style 
music with choreographed move- 
ments, at the Pennsylvania State 
Music Educators convention in Her- 
shey was my proudest moment. 
Even though their director was the 
driving force behind their success- 
(ond a permanent model to me as 
a music teacher)-just knowing that I 
was somehow associated with this 
fantastic group of kids reminded me 
of why I had chosen the education 
as in the first place--to see students 
work hard and succeed in reaching 
their potential and fulfilling their 
goals. 

Looking back, I feel that my years 
at Clarion prepared me well for 
what I was expected to do as a 
student teacher. My music and 
French co-ops, both Clarion grods, 
employed many of the same tech- 
niques and ideas I had been taught. 
Each hod their own style of teach- 
ing, however, I have simiorly begun 
to develop my own. As I prepare 
now to begin work as a graduate 
student at West Virginia University, I 
know that it won't be long until I will 
continue my development as an 
educator. My years at Clarion hove 
indeed prepared me for what lies 
ahead. I will always be grateful to 
each of the professors, teachers 
and friends who helped prepare me 
through to the realization of my pro- 
fessional goals. 

-Brian Henry 

-Page Design By Wendy Wieland 



Academics 



116 




Academics 



117 



Where is Military Science 
Going? 

ROTC, Be All That You Can Be 



The department has grown tre- 
mendously in the last five years and 
anticipates more growth for the fu- 
ture. The military science courses 
available have become competi- 
tive across campus. At Clarion, the 
Military Science program is not a mil- 
itary obligation, except for military 
scholarship recipients. Subjects such 
as customs, and organization of the 
Army, national security, military his- 
tory, and introduction to leadership 
are taught during the first two years. 
The Advanced Program Course, or 
last two years of the R.O.T.C. Pro- 
gram enrollment, commits the ca- 
det to military service upon commis- 
sioning. Instruction includes 
management, ethics and profes- 
sionalism, decision making, and ad- 
vanced leadership concepts. Dur- 
ing the summer between the junior 
and senior year, cadets attend a 
fully paid six-week training session 
called Advanced Camp at Fort 
Bragg, North Carolina. 

Incentives to enroll in R.O.T.C. in- 
clude: 4, 3, and 2 year scholarships 
which pay $7,000 or 80% of annual 
tuition (whichever is greater), books 
($190 each semester), and $100 
monthly (max $1000 annually) dur- 
ing the school year; the opportunity 
to participate in the Simultaneous 
Membership Program (SMP) by join- 
ing the reserve forces unit and re- 



cleve pay at the Sergeant E-5 rank: 
and, giant valuable managerial, 
communication, and leadership 
training which is vital to either a mili- 
tary or civilian career. 

Retention in the freshman classes 
at Clarion has doubled this year. The 
curriculum change from military his- 
tory to military subjects has been 
very successful. Instruction for re- 
quired subjects such as leadership 
theory and application, manage- 
ment. Military Qualification Skills, 
Tactical Concepts and Application, 
and Professional Knowledge Sub- 
jects. This has introduced military 
subjects to freshmen and sopho- 
mores earlier in their careers, and 
allows increased leadership evalua- 
tions of them. The quality of the 
Lieutenants commissioned is further 
increased. 

The department of Military Sci- 
ence is seeing a more highly inter- 
ested and motivated cadet in their 
classroom. Three students organiza- 
tions have risen to the top of their 
field or have demonstrated quality 
improvements. The Military Science 
department is producing a quality 
lieutenant and their training pro- 
gram is solid. The department is 
looking forward to another chal- 
lenging and dynamic year. 

-Major Emory 

Page Design By Wendy Wieland 




■*'*%is«i 



Q 



The Military Science Facuity 
points out advatanges of 
R.O.T.C. to interested students. 





Receiving experience and skills 




On May 13, 1989, after complet- 
ing four years of R.O.T.C, I was 
commissioned an officer in tlie Unit- 
ed States Army. R.O.T.C. gives peo- 
ple a chance to practice leader- 
ship, communication, and other 
interpersonal skills that are being de- 
manded by so many of the employ- 
ers of today's business world. The 
road to receiving a commision in the 
United States Army isn't always an 
easy one, but no one said succeed- 
ing in life is either. Rote can give a 
person that extra edge in succeed- 
ing in what ever that person 
chooses to do in life. 

-Lieutenant Henry R. Brown 



1988-89 Military Science Faculty (L to R): Ms. Diane Simpson, SSG Lee 
Jefferson, SSG Gedelyn Lewis, CPT Mike Manley, MAJ Jeff Emory, MAJ 
Steve Maida, MAJ Dave Jockman, LTC Ronald Faulkner, SGM David Wynn, 



► 



"R.O.T.C. is a challenge and 
an award." George Horey 





Academics 



120 



A Man of Business... 



Hr 



A perspective student's first step 
to enrollment into Clarion University 
of Pennsylvania begins in the Admis- 
sions Office, Tfie Admission's Office 
goal is to invite these students to 
learn more about our University's: 
departments, faculty, and campus. 
The information received thru the 
mail links the perspective student 
with the University; for many this is 
their first impression of Clarion 
University. 

The College of Business Adminis- 
tration is the second largest college 
at Clarion University, therefore, a 
large majority of the perspective 
students are requesting information 
about the business programs. The 
reasons for today and tomorrow's 
growth is because of the stong 
leadership and quality within the 
College of Business Administration, 

The objectives of the College of 
Business Administration include the 
following: to assist students in arriv- 



ing at a better understanding of the 
complex relationships inherent in the 
rapidly changing worlds of business, 
industry, and government; to pro- 
vide educational experiences 
which help students develop their 
potential for leadership and service; 
to offer a high quality environment 
for educational enrichment; to de- 
velop analytical ability, intellectual 
sensitivity, imagination, communica- 
tion skills and adaptability. 

Dr. Joseph P. Grunenwald, dean 
of the College of Business, describe 
the Dana Still College as a school 
with five departments; Manage- 
ment, Econmics, Finance, and Mar- 
keting. The College of Business Ad- 
minisrtation is a high level of 
University commitment, a maturity 
department, and was founded 
twenty years ago. This Muti-disci- 
pline College has eight major pro- 
grams and one minor. International 
Business. The M.S. A. program has 



approximately 75 students involved. 
When asked about what the stu- 
dents should know about the Col- 
lege of Business when they are mak- 
ing the desicion to declare their 
major. Dr. Grunenwald replies, "The 
physical assets of the school, 1800 
to 3000 students compared to 10 or 
12 thousand students enrolled at 
other business colleges. The instruc- 
tors teach the class, not graduate 
students. Our faculty has a lot of 
doctorates, researchers, and writ- 
ers. The professors are here for the 
students." After listening to Dr. 
Grunenwald, I discovered that the 
College of Business Administration 
has a well qualified staff that really 
cares for their students. I found Dr. 
Grunenwald to be a young leader 
with many influencing ideas that will 
lead the College of Business far into 
the future. 

-Maureen Freimuth 

-Page Design By Wendy Wieland 



Academics 



^2^ 



Who's Who Among 
American Universities 



Who's Who Among Students In Americon 
Universities and Coiieges is a nationai honor 
bestowed on outstanding campus ieaders 
for their schoiastic and community 
achievements. The university's quota of 
nominees is estabiished by the Who's Who 
office in Tuscaioosa, Aiabama The criteria 
for nomination are: 

1. Fuii-time student with junior, senior or 
graduate status. 

2. t\/lust have obtained a QPA of 3.5 or 
better by September 1. 

3. Must have above average leadership 
abiiity, participation in community 
services. 

Students are nominated for this honor by 
faculty or staff, or they can nominate 
themselves. A nomination committee 
comprised of faculty and students review 
applications for criteria requirements and 
recommend to the Vice President for 
Student Affairs. The Vice President then 
submits the names of the students 
recommended to the national office of 
Who's Who, who makes the final decision. 

- Wendy Wieland 

- Page Design By Wendy Wieland 



L 



Academics 



122 



Stuc 
And 


lents In 
Colleges 


» . . . 


F. Thomas Battista 
Knox, PA 


David Thomas Hrivnak 
Natrona Heights, PA 


Lynn Marie Olsen 
Sheffield, PA 


Maria Clarie Battista 
Knox, PA 


Cheryl Lynn Johnson 
Warren, PA 


Timothy William O'Neil 
Cranberry, PA 


Jane Frances Bender 
Koppel, PA 


Rhonda Lynn Johnson 
Bulter, PA 


Sandra Smeltzer Painter 
Brookville, PA 


Maryanne Benjannin 
Saint Marys, PA 


MaryAnn Joy 
Mercer, PA 


Linda Jo Schirmer 
Summerville, PA 


Ruth P. Bermudez 
El Centro, CA 


Laura Jeanne Kidder 
Akron, NY 


Anna Marie Smay 
Monroeville, PA 


Michaeline Anne Botti 
Mars, PA 


Sharon Lynn Knapik 
Greenville, PA 


Stephanie Lynn Stotler 
Marietta, PA 


Rose M. Boyer 
New Bethlehem, PA 


Mary Ann Kristoft 
West Mifflin, PA 


Kenneth Robert Snyder Jr. 
Brookville, PA 


Ronald E. Bradley 
Franklin, PA 


Maureen Ann Lafferty 
Pittsburgh, PA 


Delia Kayka Tarabrella 
Shippenville, PA 


Darci Kim Bratter 
Amawalk, NY 


Barbara Jean LaVan 
Lucinda, PA 


Robert Douglas Todd 
Aliquippa, PA 


Catherine M. Collins 
Pittsburgh, PA 


Fyaro KonKiaw/ Liew 
Clarion, PA 


Renee Ann Toth 
Latrobe, PA 


Angela Denise Dykins 
Titusville, PA 


Tammy Jo Lininger 
Greenville, PA 


Cindy Fay Vogan 
Sharon, PA 


Marie Celine Gatesman 
Lucinda, PA 


William David Llev^/ellyn 
Huntingdon, PA 


Tracey Lane Weisel 
Strattenville, PA 


Denise Ann Glivic 
Bethel Park, PA 


Michelle llona Tracy Marko 
Mount Gretna, PA 


Michelle Marie Winters 
■ Madera, PA 


Catherine Lynn Hartle 
Lucinda, PA 


Zelma W. Martin 
Oil City, PA 


Roger Stephen Wolbert 
Lucinda, PA 


Patricia Lynn Hauber 
Erie, PA 


Cora Jean McDonald 
Corsica, PA 


Stephanie Marie Woytko 
West Mifflin, PA 


Brian E. Henry 
Bethel Park, PA 


Christine Beth Muhlhammer 
Saint Marys, PA 


Janice Lynn Zawacki 
Hermitage, PA 


Mary Ann Hirsch 
Portville, NY 


Timothy Eugene Murray 
Oak Ridge, PA 





Academics 



123 




Alan Strang, portrayed by Rob Fix, sits atop tlie be- 
loved horse that he blinded, played by Kevin Foringer, 
in this year's production of "Equus". 



A student trudges along the worn path to Mar wick - 
Boyd to enjoy a musical performance. 




TELESCOPE: 



Observing The Stars 

Captured on these pages ore the dreams and aspirations of Clarion University's 
rising stars and taiented musicians. Contained in the notes of each played piece 
and the words of every memorized line is the evidence of these aspiring profession- 
al's hard work and determination. Their presence on our campus brings culture and 
history into focus on a bare Clarion stage. Our telescope also focuses on the 
dedication that is present in each member of the theater, from director, to per- 
former, to technician. We applaud and salute the efforts of these future stars. 

-Section Editor Tim Miller 

-Section Design By Wendy Wieland 




DRAMA 



m 



'y^i''' 



Coming of age in the 
early 1900's 

The stage was set in the Little 
Theatre during October as the 
Clarion University Theatre pro- 
duction of Eugene O'Neill's "Ah, 
Wilderness!" canne to life The au- 
dience was transported back to 
the 4th of July, 1906, where they 
encountered the trials and tribu- 
lations of the Miller family. 

This "coming of age" story de- 
picted Richard "Dick" Miller 
(played by Robert C. Fix) as a 
misunderstood high school stu- 
dent whose interest and love of 
literature proved to be a bit more 
than most of his elders could han- 
dle. By sharing some of this some- 
what risque poetry with his young 
girlfriend, Muriel, Richard found 
himself presented with a letter 
from her stating her desire to not 
see him any longer. Since Richard 
had no idea that Muriel was 
forced by her father to write the 
letter, he felt compelled to shun 
her as he felt she had forsaken 
him. After a drunken evening with 
a prostitute, Richard discovered 
via another letter from Muriel that 
she still did love him and wanted 
to meet with him secretly. Rich- 
ard's rendezvous with Muriel reas- 
sured them of their love and re- 
sulted in the "happily ever after" 
ending. 

The cast of "Ah, Wilderness!" 
included: Jeffrey R. James, Annie 
Yost, Kevin Porringer, Robert C. 
Fix, Maegon Barlow, Chris Barlow, 
Mark G. Stallsmith, Michele Edge!!, 
Douglas Anderson, Lisa Walker, 
Frank S. Scherer, Paula G. Mar- 
cink, Pete Grubbs, and David A, 
Fry. Technical crew included Di- 
rector Mary Hardwick, Set De- 
signer Robert Levy, Costume De- 
signer Anne Edwards, Light 
Designer Robert Clowes, Stage 
Manager Sonde Kuzio, Master 
Electrician Robert Moyer and 
Properties Master Craig Pratt. All 
those involved with this produc- 
tion obviously worked very hard 
to bring "Ah, Wilderness!" to Clar- 
ion University. 

-Mimi Benjamin 

-Page Design By Cherry Mayo 




Rob Fix received the "Silver Fox Comedy Award" for his portrayal of Richard 
Miller in this fall production. 

Annie Yost and Jeff James play the fidgety parents of a young adolescent 
son. 



Fine Arts 



126 




A Student Directed 
Spectacular 

Through the hard work and 
dedication of some Clarion Uni- 
versity students, Neil Simon's "The 
Good Doctor" came to life on 
the CUP stage. Initially the show 
was seen at the Sawmill Theatre 
in Cook Forest during September 
of 1988, but the Chapel Theatre 
held anxious audiences who 
came to see "The Good Doctor" 
during Autumn Leaf Festival 
Weekend. 

Directed by Clarion University 
student David Fry, the Neil Simon 
play was performed by The 
Green Forest Players, the acting 
troupe of the honorary theatre 
fraternity. Alpha Psi Omega. The 
show portrayed an author whose 
characters came to life for the 
audience to witness in a series of 
one-act scenes. From the come- 
dy of "The Sneeze" to the more 
serous episode with the Govern- 
ess to the the side-splitting hilarity 
of "The Defenseless Creature," 
the audience was able to see the 
versitility of the actors and ac- 
tresses who all played numerous 
characters. Rob Fix, Chuck Lu- 
kens, Paula Marcink, Barb Lunds- 
ford, and John Greenawalt com- 
prised the original cast, but Fred 
Shade and director Dave Fry 
were "pitch-hitters" when an ac- 
cident diisabled Greenawalt for 
the Chapel performances. 

It was a tedious preparation 
period as the cast began re- 
hearsing in early August and 
didn't close the show until mid- 
October. He really didn't like the 
show when he was picked to di- 
rect it. He remarked, "After all 
the headaches, all the hassels, 
and hellacious hours, I better ei- 
ther get a good job or I better 
have my place in heaven." If you 
saw the show, you would proba- 
bly agree that Mr. Fry has a gold 
star on his resume... and he can 
probably start polishing his halo 
too. 

-Mimi Benjamin 
-Page Design By Wendy 
Wieland 



David Fry, director of "Good Doctor", plays an inquisitive youtii following in 
the footsteps of his father. 

Chuck Luckens is attacl<ed by a seductive dentist, played by David Fry. 



Fine Arts 



127 



Intensity on the Stage 

Peter Shaffer's "Equus", direct- 
ed by Dr. Adam Weiss, came to 
the CUP stage in November of 
1988, Martin Dysart, played by 
Frank Clarl<, was a psychiatrist at 
Rokeby Psychiatric Hospitai in 
Southern England who told the 
tale of Alan Strang, a young man 
whose fascination with horses 
led to his admission to a hospital. 
Strang, played by Robert C. Fix, 
was interested in horses as a 
youth when his father presented 
him with a photograph of a horse 
to hang in his room. Strang grew 
to worship horses and learned the 
latin word for the animal... 
"Equus". As the story continued, 
we learned that Alan met Jill Ma- 
son, a young woman working in a 
nearby stable. Mason, portrayed 
by Jennifer Miliken, arranged for 
Strang to work In the stables, and 
Alan's obsession with horses grew. 
He viewed the horses in the sta- 
ble as supreme beings who 
watched him. After an encounter 
with Jill in the stable, Alan blinded 
the horses who he feared wit- 
nessed his promiscuity. The blind- 
ing of horses was considered a 
criminal offense, and magistrate 
Hester Salomon, played by Shar- 
on Moore, begged Dysart to 
treat the young Strang. Through 
Dysart's investigation of Alan's 
background, he discovered the 
tension between Strang's par- 
ents, Dora and Frank, played by 
Barbara Lundsford and Frank 
Scherer. Alan refused to cooper- 
ate at the beginning of his treat- 
ment, but eventually succumbed 
to Dysart's professional tactics. In 
the final emotionally draining 
scene, Alan reveals his entire sto- 
ry by acting it out under hypnosis. 
Other cast member including 
David Fry as Harry Dalton, Kevin 
Porringer as the Horseman, Mi- 
chelle Edgell as the Nurse and 
John Crispen, Kevin Major, Caro- 
lyn Mansager, and Down Polinski 
as the Horses, added intensity to 
this moving performance. The 
technical crew, including Stage 
Manager Wendy Wieland, Dia- 
lect Coach Douglas Johnson, 
Master Electrician Dwayne Ben- 
nett, Scenic Designer Bob Levy, 
Light Designer Craig Pratt, Cos- 
tume Designer Howard Kurtz, and 
Sound Director Emily Sweetman 
fine tuned this magnificent per- 
formance. 

-Mimi Benjamin 

-Page Design By Wendy 
Wieland 




Dysart surprises Alan as he Is suddenly owaken from a nightmare. 
The cast of the award winning show EQUUS. 



Fine Arts 



128 





Sonde Kuzio during her nnonologue in her presentation of theatre l<nowledge. The 
show became o tearjerl<er as the performance came to on end. 

During one of mony rehearsals, senior Rob Fix practices his acting talents with 
David Fry, 



Test of Talent 

In the beginning of a student's 
career, the student who desires 
to enter the theatre program as 
a Bachelor of Fine Arts must audi- 
tion for placement. The student 
then endures himself in a variety 
of views that enables him to see 
theatre as a whole. From acting 
to stage lighting, the actor dis- 
covers all the skills needed. By the 
end of his college career the stu- 
dent is to put on a show using 
such skills. He begins with gather- 
ing several pieces of work that 
will show his ability to sing, dance, 
and act. The actor will work with 
people to design his set and cos- 
tuming. This person is allowed to 
have two other actors/actresses 
and a musician to accompany in 
his performance. This event only 
shows one evening and under- 
goes a review by faculty mem- 
bers simultaneously. After the 
performance, the candidate dis- 
covers if he will graduate from 
the department. 

Two seniors this year that went 
through this process ore Sandra J. 
Kuzio from Glenshaw, PA and 
Robert C. Fix from Hallstead, PA. 
Sonde's show came first and 
proved to be a success. She se- 
lected Rob Fix, Yvonne Dobr- 
zanski, and Pete Grubbs to ac- 
company. This year Sonde stage 
managed the production of 'Ah 
Wilderness', performed in "Joseph 
and the Amazing Technicolor 
Dreamcoaf and 'Ondine', not to 
mention the stage construction 
work she has done. Rob's show 
was performed in May and also 
proved to be a winner. Some of 
Rob's credits include the lead 
roles in 'Ah, Wilderness', and 
'Equus', performances in 'Joseph 
and the Amazing Technicolor 
Dreamcoaf, and 'Ondine'. 
Among his accompanists, was 
David Alan Fry who will be per- 
forming his own show within the 
next year. Sonde and Rob 
passed this nerve racking experi- 
ence with flying colors. 

Both members are alumni of Al- 
pha Psi Omega, the theatre hon- 
orary fraternity, where Sonde 
presided as president this past 
year. Best of luck to both gradu- 
ates in their future endeavors. 

-Wendy Sue Wieland 

-Page Design By Wendy Sue 
Wlelond 



Fine Arts 



A29 



Nothing To Lose Tour 

On April 25, 1989 Center Board 
presented Eddie Money on his 
"Nothing To Lose" Tour in Tippin 
Gymnasium. Opening up for Ed- 
die Money was the new metal 
band. Warrant. At a cost $8 per 
ticket an estimated 1,000 stu- 
dents and Clarion residents 
crowded into Tippin and either 
packed themselves in front of the 
stage or found seats up in the 
bleachers. Around 8 pm the 5 
wildly, spandex clad rockers of 
Warrant swarmed the stage. 
With a definite hard rocking met- 
al sound Warrant gave a show 
which included many of their 
songs from their recently released 
album including the chart topper 
"Down Boys". Warrant showed 
what true hard core rocking is 
about jumping from one side of 
the stage to the other. The audi- 
ence was really excited when 
the lead singer, wearing a Phi Sig- 
ma Kappa sweatshirt, jumped 
from the stage and roamed 
through the crowd where at one 
point was lifted to the shoulders 
of the crowd and carried to the 
stage. 

After the thrashing sounds of 
Warrant the audience prepared 
itself for that timeless rocker Ed- 
die Money. Eddie song some the 
tunes from the past albums that 
hod brought fame, as well as 
some of his newer releases from 
the "Nothing To Lose" album like 
"Walk on Water" and "Take Me 
Home Tonight". Eddie rocked out 
as he got into twirling his tambor- 
ine, playing the saxophone and 
harmonica, and singing his heart 
out. Overall, it was one high flying 
concert dedicated to the philos- 
ophies of rock-n-roll. 
-Michael Dupree 
-Page Design By Wendy 
Wieland 




staff Photographe 



Eddie sings with such passion and 
emotion 



Eddie showed a greet expertise with 
his tamborine. 



Fine Arts 



130 






Paul Withrow sings the blues in his Elvis- 
like portrayal of Pharoh. 

Mark Stahlsmith, portraying Joseph, 
and the cast raise their arms in cele- 
bration the during the musical. 

Rob Fix and partner Germaine Burtner 
move the crovi/ds with their melan- 
choly redition of dancer from "Pair- 
eeee". 



A Rock Musical 

Israelites in tye-dye? Elvis as the 
ruler of Egypt? Sound crazy? It 
was crazy during the production 
of "Joseph and the Amazing 
Technicolor Dreamcoat" in Feb- 
ruary of 1989. University Theatre 
and Lyric Theatre combined to 
produce the musical depiction of 
the Bible story of Joseph and his 
coat of many colors. Joseph's 
tale of fraternal jealousy was told 
by the Narrator, Terry Wickline. 
Because Joseph, played by Mark 
Stallsmith, received a multicol- 
ored coat from his father, his 
brothers' jealousy of him led to 
the selling of Joseph to "a hairy 
bunch of Ishmaelites" who took 
him to Egypt as a slave. In Egypt, 
Joseph was purchased by Poti- 
phar whose seductive wife man- 
aged to put Joseph in a compro- 
mising position, and he was 
thrown in jail. While in jail, Joseph 
interpreted dreams for Pharoh's 
servants and eventually he was 
called to interpret the dreams of 
Pharoh, played by Paul Withrow. 
The Pharoh, swinging hips and 
passing out scarves in true-to-EI- 
vis-form, told Joseph about his 
dreams and made Joseph his 
second in command. Meanwhile, 
back in Caonon, Joseph's family 
was suffering because of the 
famine and decided to go to 
Egypt to beg for food, not know- 
ing Joseph was there. Kneeling at 
his feet, Joseph's brothers grov- 
eled, still uncertain of their broth- 
er's identity. Joseph gave them 
food while testing their honesty 
by placing a golden cup in his 
youngest brother's sack of food. 
When the older brothers begged 
him to let Benjamin go and to 
blame them for the crime, Joseph 
knew they were honest and re- 
vealed his identity. At the play's 
conclusion, Joseph and his broth- 
ers were reunited with their 
father. 

The musical was directed and 
choreographed by Pauline Brooks 
with John McLean as the music 
director. "Joseph" contained 
music of all types, from country to 
rock to calypso, with many hours 
of hard work and dancing. The 
colorful costumes and set, the 
enthusiasm of the cast and crew, 
and the excitement of the audi- 
ences combined to make "Jo- 
seph" a great success. 
-Mimi Benjamin 
-Page Design By Sharon Miller 



Fine Arts 



sfANTASY 



Royal Fairytale 

A feudal world of rich courts, 
fairytale forests, errant knights, 
and commonfolk who paid hom- 
age to their barons and their local 
gods was brought to the Clarion 
stage this spring in the form of 
"Ondine", a 1939 German fanta- 
sy play. During this production, 
the audience is transported into 
a human kingdom of peasants 
and courtiers as well as a fantas- 
tic world of water spirits and ma- 
gicians. Both realms have a heir- 
archy and both have thier 
regulations-on actions and be- 
havior, on place and power. The 
success of this production is a two 
fold, in the creation of human and 
super-natural worlds which pro- 
vides the audience with an es- 
cape from 1989 in skillfully pre- 
senting the complex tensions of 
the plot and characterizations. 

The play opens in fog and ends 
in nriystery— but along the way we 
are amused, entertained, se- 
duced, frustrated, saddened, an- 
gered, and enlightened. The fog 
in the first scene surrounds a hum- 
ble cottage, designed like a 
Flemish oilpainting, where a fisher- 
man and his fishwife are honored 
to receive a visitor--the errant 
knight Ritter Hans von Wittenstein 
zu Wittenstein, who becomes 
torn between his obligations to 
duty and the court and his desire 
for fulfilling but unobtainable love. 

The play shifts to the royal 
court, a place as fantastic as the 
spirit world , Here, The Old One 
becomes "an illusionist without 
apparatus," and he controls 
whatever happens next, leading 
the courtiers and princesses 
through scenes of what is and 
what could be--both illusions. 
There is a deadly serious side to all 
this frivolity-the characters Ber- 
tha, Bertram, Ondine, and Hans 
enter the struggle to understand 
love, with its tenderness, insecuri- 
ty, and pain. The cast does won- 
ders with this complex material. 
The conflict between practicality 
and instinct, the role of the out- 
sider, the real and unreal nature 
of love-all are given scope by 
the strong performances. 

-William Blozek 

-Page Design By Wendy 

Wieland 




Melinda Sudik 




Melinda Sudik 
Ondine, Vannessa Singleton, forgets obout tier past love, Hans portrayed by Davidj 
Fry, 

Playing the water nymphi was a lot of fun for ttiis student senator. 



Fine Arts 



132 








Writing Comes Alive 

Reader's Theatre has been a 
pleasant turn from the regular 
season for some of Clarion's more 
dedicated theatre-goers. It's a 
chance to see some regular 
mainstage performers in a new 
atomshere and also to get a 
taste of some of the up and com- 
ing talent CUP Theatre has to 
offer. 

Under the direction of Dr. Mary 
Hardwick, they have brought all 
sorts of literature to life for their 
audiences. This year Reader's 
theatre presented a program 
dealing with "Man's Treatmrent 
of Man." Performers presented 
the prose, drama, and poetry 
genres to their small but enthusi- 
astic audiences. 

Performances were given by 
Kevin Porringer, Michele Edgell, 
Barbara Lunsford, Terry Wickline, 
David Alan Fry, and Pete Grubbs. 
Some of the pieces performed in- 
cluded a cutting from the classic 
"Tom Sawyer"; a man's rediscov- 
ery of MacBeth In a whole new 
comic light; a monologue about 
an old-fashioned rodeo girl who is 
forced to give into commercial- 
Ism, and the story of a cruel, 
domineering man and his mental- 
ly and physically abused wife, 
each teling their own side of the 
story. 

-Barbara Lunsford 
-Page Design by Wendy 
Wieland 



Oral Interpretation 



Barbara Lunsford and David Fry perform for an evening witfi Reader's Theatre. 

Terry Wickline captures tiie audience witfi her piece of literature as she 
theoretically becomes the main character. 



Fine Arts 



i33 



Clarion's Gugenhiem 

Nestled on the second floor of 
Marwick-Boyd Fine Arts Building, 
within the tranquil and docile hall, 
is the exciting and inspiring Sand- 
forn Art Gallery, The Sandford Art 
Gallery, owned by Clarion Univer- 
sity, is more than Just a few pretty 
pictures. 

The gallery itself consists of 
walls for hanging art, a reception 
desk, and display pillars. One of 
Sandford's wall is glass so that the 
brilliant art works will catch the 
interested art buff. Though the 
Sandford Art Gallery puts on 
shows for the campus, it is also 
one of the most elegant spots on 
campus and is used for 
receptions. 

Sandford Art Gallery has to 
date approximately sixty pieces 
of art that has been purchased 
from various artists. The art 
ranges from paintings to sculp- 
tures, from abstract to folk. By 
keeping a variety of works, the 
gallery hopes to tickle the taste 
buds of everyone interested in 
art. 

Sandford does not, however, 
limit itself to displaying its own 
pieces. The gallery also sponsors 
local and national artists to pre- 
sent art shows for Clarion's cam- 
pus. Occassionally followed by 
refreshments or demonstrations, 
these shows make up a culturally 
relaxing evening. 

-Sharon Miller 

-Page Design By Wendy 
Wieland 




.■^s^ 





Mental visions become reality on ttie canvas 

Mike Haluska enjoys Sandford's recent sculpture extiibit 



Fine Arts 



134 




A Midevil Dinner 

Clarion returned to the middle 
ages withi the annual Madrigal 
Dinner which featured two dinner 
performances for the second 
consecutive year. Tradition was 
followed in the reproduction of 
the Old English Christmas feast 
designed to welcome in the Yule- 
tide season. 

Chandler Dining Hall was turned 
into a renaissance castle deco- 
rated with pine boughs, candles, 
shields, crests and tapestries. It 
was filled with people in cos- 
tumed characters from a long 
ago time while the joyous music 
of Christmas played. 

Following the entrance of the 
Madrigal Singers, in the 16th cen- 
tury period attire, each course of 
the meal was paraded through 
the dining hall accompanied by 
the appropriate music. 

Under the direction of Milutin 
Lazich, a concert of Madrigal 
singing followed the dinner. Mad- 
rigals are songs written for small 
chamber groups, sung without 
music. Madrigals were published 
in written form only in the late 
16th and early 17th centuries. The 
lords and ladies of the time period 
frequently performed the music 
themselves following a festive re- 
past or a gala occasion in the 
great hall. The twelve days of 
Christmas emphasized this 
tradition. 

-Kelly L. Radziewicz 
-Page Design By Wendy 
Wieland 



Presiding over the feast were the Madrigal King and Queen. 
The head table rises as the Madrigal festivities begin. 



Fine Arts 



435 



Shining Above the Rest 

The Brass Choir is a specialized 
musical organization centered 
around performing music specifi- 
cally designed for the large brass 
ensemble- Members of the Brass 
Choir need to have muscianship, 
as well as a pleasing tone quality, 
exact intonations, precise 
rhythmn and clear articulation 
With a membership size of nearly 
25, the Brass Choir is lead by Advi- 
sor Dr. Dean A, Farnham and Club 
President Brian Henry. The Choir 
presents pieces from its varied re- 
petoire of 16th and 17th century 
scores, as weW as, some more 
contemporary and popular 
arrangements. 
-Michael Dupree 
-Page Design By Wendy 
Wieland 





Lourie Kessif 



Dr Farnham directs the Choir in a modern tune 

The Choir takes a bow after a spectacular performance. 



Fine Arts 



136 




In Harmony 

Clarion University's Concert 
Choir is well known throughout 
the Commonwealth. With almost 
100 members, the Concert Choir 
tours the state visiting other col- 
leges and schools to once again 
show off the the talent of Clarion 
students. However, the choir is 
best known for its wonderful 
Christmas concert here in Clarion. 
The choir performs many styles of 
songs ranging from the religious 
spiritual harmonizing to some 
more modern songs of rock-n-roll. 
With advisor Mr. Milutin Lazich and 
President Joe Coccimiglio, stu- 
dents are auditioned for mem- 
bership. The Concert choir looks 
for individuals with singing and 
voice articulation abilities mixed 
with previous choral experience. 
Precision, harmonizing, and dedi- 
cation are all needed to make 
beautiful music. 

-Michael Dupree 

-Page Design By 

Timothy Miller 



Sing out loud, sing out clear. 

This Clarion singer mokes It look so easy to perform. 



Fine Arts 



137 



Spirit Raisers 

The Golden Eagle Marching 
Band is a 120 piece unit which is 
connprised of insturmentalists, col- 
or guard, and majorettes. The 
Band is a precision unit dedicated 
to exactness in marching as well 
as playing. The Marching Band 
performs at all home and away 
games as well as performing in 
local parades and festivals such 
OS the Autumn Leaf Festival pa- 
rade. It is the job the band to not 
only play well but present them- 
selves well. They are not merely 
halftime relief but an important 
part of the spirit of Clarion Univer- 
sity. They are dedicated to en- 
couraging the crowd and creat- 
ing the enthusiasm which wins 
gomes. Dr Stanely F. Michalski Jr 
is the Advisor for Marching Bond 
and Kevin Parsons is the President 
of the group. 

-Michael Dupree 

-Page Design By 

Timothy Miller 




Melinda Suail 



mmm^m 





Vickie Clement 



The mighty trumpets announce the coming ot Clarion's warriors 



Marching and showmanship are just as important as being able to play an instrt 
ment. 



Fine Arts 



138 




20th Anniversary 

The percussion ensemble is a 
specialized organization offering 
students an opportunity to study 
and perform modern chamber 
compositions for the persussion in- 
strument. It is the purpose of the 
Clarion University Percussion En- 
semble to provide audiences an 
audition of major trends in per- 
cussion music within a develop- 
mental framev»/orl< by musicians 
training in percussion. Contempo- 
rary works, transcriptions of eorly 
music, music of various ethnic 
groups, and Jazz-Rock works are 
studied and performed. 

Founded in 1968-69, the per- 
cussion has developed under the 
direction of Lowerence J. Wells. 
Membership in the Percussive Arts 
Society is open to all Percussion 
Majors and other interested stu- 
dents by audition. 

Members include: Alex Cian- 
frocco from Allison Park, PA; Bill 
Congersky from Windber, PA; Pat 
Litzinger from Baden, PA; John 
Murray from Kane, PA; David Ste- 
phens from East Aurora, NY; and 
Von Winger from Shippenville, PA. 
-Wendy Wieland 
-Page Design by Mike Dupree 



Bill Congersky carefully watches the director's motions as another musician 
watches his sheet music. 

Percussion Ensemble provides modern chamber compositions. One opportuni- 
ty to share this music with an audience took place November 6, 1988 at 
Marwick-Boyd Auditorium. 



Fine Arts 



439 



Music at its Best 



The Symphonic Band is com- 
posed of the finest musicians 
available on Clarion's campus. 
Students must first audition for 
placement before they become 
a member and even a successful 
audition is dependent upon the 
need for a particular instrument. 
With a membership of 50 stu- 
dents, the symphonic band is one 
of the largest musical organiza- 
tions on campus and must con- 
stantiy practice to be the best. 
The honor attached to being port 
of the symphonic band is such 
that there is always competition 
to be invovled. 

With advisor and conductor Dr. 
Stanely F. Michaiski Jr., the sym- 
phonic band creates a well bal- 
anced performance. The band 
OS a symphony performs a wide 
selection ranging from the finest 
historical, classical, and contem- 
porary scores to some of the 
more recent rock n roll and jazz 
music. The symphonic band is well 
known for its fantastic concerts 
and interesting repetoire of mu- 
sic. This can be seen by large au- 
dience attendance which is 
comprised not only of students 
but many of the residents from 
the area. However, the symphon- 
ic doesn't limit itself to just Clarion. 
The band tours to other schools 
and halls to so perform for others. 
-Michael Dupree 
-Page Design By 
Timothy Miller 




Great music just comes naturally 
Keeping an eye on the Conductor isn't as easy as it looks. 



Fine Arts 



140 




20th Anniversary 

At 226 Marwick-Boyd, is Clarion 
University's Lab Jazz Band. Found- 
ed in 1968-69 by Dr. Rex Mitchell, 
the Lab Jazz Band celebrated 
twenty years of music making. 
Featuring outstanding student in- 
strumentalists, the ensemble pre- 
sents two formal concerts on the 
Clarion Campus each academic 
year, plus other presentations for 
the university community upon 
request. Not to mention the per- 
formances off campus. Each fall 
and spring semester, the Lab 
Band tours to various locations, 
offering concerts and clinics to 
school and community audi- 
ences. The ensemble's tour 
schedules have carried the orga- 
nization throughout western and 
central Pennsylvania and into 
Ohio and New York State, 

This group of talented musi- 
cians study jazz through rehersals 
and performances of a variety of 
literature. The members are en- 
couraged to write, arrange, and 
conduct their works in a laborato- 
ry setting. Lab Jazz Band is open 
to all qualified university students. 
Membership of the spring 89 
band includes: on saxophones, 
Arlene Griffths, Leader,Alto; Chris- 
topher DeJohn, Alto, Baritone: 
Robert Hegburg, Tenor: on trum- 
pets: Christopher McKee, Co- 
Leader; Matthew Wirfel, Co- 
Leader; Michael Drozdo; Jay Ellas: 
Jason Papinchak: Jennifer Shield: 
Stanley Smith: on Trombones: 
Christy Copozzo, Leader; Lisa 
Hummel; George Lander; Lance 
Moloney. The painist is Jennifer 
O'Brien, the guitarist is Richard Fa- 
bec, the key bass player is Marina 
Stohr and the percussion is David 
Stephens. 

-Wendy Wieland 

-Page Design By Tim Miller 



[\\ 



MUSIC 



Ivvj 






From East Aurora, New York, David Stephans shows his taients on Percussion 
during a Lab Jazz Band rehersal. 

On April 12, 1989, Marwick-Boyd Auditorium was soon filled with Jazz Latin N' A 
Little Country featuring Mattew Wirfel and Shara Dunkie. 



Fine Arts 



141 



Tucker Snyder and friend enjoy the beautiful 
weather that blessed activities day this fall. 

Students scatter in different directions as they 
head toward meetings, performances, and 
practices. Clarion University offers an uncount- 
able variety of activities, groups, and clubs for 
students to get involved with. 





PARASCOPE: 

An All Around View 

There is more to college life than classes. IVIeeting new people and making new 
friends is one of the most important parts of the college experience with over 100 
groups on campus, CUP has something for everyone. Joining a group gives people 
■ that something extra when looking for a job. Joining a fraternity or sorority gives 
one friends for life and lets you meet friends all over the country. The groups at CUP 
add something extra to the campus. These groups give us opportunities and 
responsibilities that we normally would not have. They help us become better 
people and that is what college is all about. Besides, life would not be half as fun 
without extra curricular activities. 

-Section Editor by Paul Solosky 

-Section Design by Wendy Wielond ', f 

and James Dental ■ - 




r'^^'-^Sfel^^y^i^ 









Alpha Psi Omega 



Alpha Psi Omega is the honorary the- 
atre fraternity. The fraternity works with 
productions on campus and in the com- 
munity. The group offers scholarships for 
outstanding achievement. 

Front Row:(L to R) Paula Marcink (Secre- 
tary), Bob Wyor (Vice President), Sonde 
Kuzio (President), David Fry (Treasurer), 
Becky Seaman, Mary Retort, Yvonne 
Dobrzanski Back Row (L to R) Emily 
Sweetman, Evord Lukens, Douglas Ander- 
son, Amy Santa, Rob Clowes, Pete 
Grubbs, Wendy Wieland, Rob Fix 




Alpha Mu Gamma 



The Delta Lambda chapter of Alpha Mu 
Gamma is the national collegiate foreign 
study honor society 

The stated purposes of A.M.G, ore to 
recognize achievement in the study of 
foreign languages, to promote language 
learning and to increase understanding 
among people of different cultures 

Front Row (L to R) Erin Hartle (Treasurer), 
Melonie Benn (Secretary), Karina Blose, 
Rhonda Green Bock Row;(L to R) Dr Eriko 
Kluesener (Sponser), Kirk Doran, Felice 
Walker (President), Pamela Twigg. 



Beta Beta Beta 



Tri-Beta is the Upsilon Xi chapter of the 
National Beta Beta Beta Biological Honor 
Society. This active group emphasizes 
scholarship, the dissemination of scientific 
knowledge, and the promotion of biologi- 
cal research 

Front Row (L to R) Cheri Graham, Betsy 
Weingartner, Judith Horvath (Vice Presi- 
dent), Sukhanya Jayochandra, Barbara 
Coles Back Row (L to R) Rebecca Aut, 
Les McSporrin, Jeff Browning (Treasurer), 
MaryAnn Joy, Lisa Pugne (President), Holly 
Peters 




Groups & Greeks 



144 




ACTIVITIES DAY 

A Campus Get-Together 

Clarion's campus was blessed 
with blue skies and fairly warm 
temperatures for its annual Activ- 
ities Day, September 18, 1989. 

Activities Day, sponsored by 
the Student Activities Office, is 
the chance for every organiza- 
tion to show off in front of per- 
spective members. Organizations 
reserve tables along the main 
sidewalks in the center of cam- 
pus and decorate them to at- 
track curious students wanting to 
get involved. Varoius groups 
gave out pins, stickers, and pam- 
phlets. The International Club sold 
ethnic cuisine and there was a 
mini-concert in Steven's Park to 
create an extremely relaxed yet 
cooperating atmosphere. 

Getting involved is what col- 
lege is all about and Activities 
Day proved that it can be enjoy- 
able and beneficial. The overall 
impact of the day could be felt 
as freshmen scurried away with 
brochures and bumper stickers 
and Clarion verterans packed up 
the tables and headed home. 

-Sharon Miller 

-Page Design By Wendy 
Wielond 



The feeling of friendship was overwelming 
during the warm afternoon. 

The diversity of student groups in the cen- 
ter of campus affirmed students that 
there is something for everyone at Ciari- 




m§Mt 




c\ 



Activities Day not only gave groups a 
chance to strut their stuff, but individuals 
as well. 



Groups &. Greeks 



145 




Psi Chi is a honorary organization Its pur- 
pose Is to encourage, stimulate and main- 
tain the scholarships of the members. The 
group also strives to help further the sci- 
ence of Psychology on the Clarion 
Campus, 

Front Row (L to R) Lynnette Wimer (Secre- 
tary). Michele Ort (Treasurer), Paula Gill. 
Melissa Hammer, Dr Janina Jolley (Faculty 
Advisor), Back Row (L to R) Darci Brotter. 
Cindy Vogan, Vonda Swarts, Darsell Har- 
ris, Carrie Urey (Vice President), Susan 
Dutch, 



Tau Beta Sigma 



Tau Beta Sigma is an educational and 
service fraternity as well as a social one. 
The group concentrates on developing 
leadership and enthusiasm in all band 
members 

Front Row;(L to R) Tracy Dangel, Cathy 
Kennedy (Treasurer), Pamela Eviing, Mary 
Ann Prince, Lynn Noval<oski, Tracey 
Schmid, Lisa Hummel (Secretary), Lisa Zim- 
merman (Vice President) Back Row; (L to 
R) Lisa Hummel (Secretary), Lynn Maruskin, 
Pam Bedison, Coby Mahlon. Donna 
Sporny, Nancy Gourley (President), Shan- 
non Koch. 



P^ 



A ^ A A A "^ A 







Alpha Sigma Alpha 



Alpha Sigma Alpha is a sorority stressing 
individual diversity and activity Their phil- 
anthropic project is Special Olympics, 

First Row:(L to R) Kimber Karpaw, Chen 
Graham, Theresa Walaski, Beckie Cernick, 
Christine Kropcho, Jull Reuther, Tracy 
Howard, Patricio O'Neill, Bonnie Edwards, 
Second Row Brenda RInaldi, Wendy Solt, 
Donna Lutz, Shari Kollmyer. Cindy Klima. 
Kathy Shaftner. Kim West, Tonya Todero. 
Lorraine Feldmeier (President). Rose Borr, 
Third Row: Camille Prinke, Lara Reish. Laura 
Tower, Sheila Gastiger, Karen MacVay, 
Amy Clayton (Vice President), Patti Barr, 
Karen Beebe, Jill Moyer 




Groups 8c Greeks 



146 




STUDENT 
SENATE 

Working For Students 

All of the students at Clarion 
University are mennbers of the 
Clarion Students' Association. The 
CSA is a non-profit corporation 
with a $600,000 annual operating 
budget. Each fall semester the 
members of CSA elect a Student 
Senate to serve as the Board of 
Directors for this corporation 

The 1989 Student Senate, lead 
by President Bob Wyar, has man- 
aged to initiate several positive 
changes for CSA and Clarion Uni- 
versity. Under the new policies. 
Student Senate will become a 
more visable group and provide 
greater representation 

The 1989 Student Senate has 
matured into a group deter- 
mined to improve the quality of 
student life. With more university 
decision input than before. Stu- 
dent Senate is mal<ing plans for 
the future of CSA and Clarion Uni- 
versity. 
-Steve Cindrich 
-Page Design By Wendv 
Wieland 




student Senate Vice President Keith 
Channpaign 

"This Is a chance to recognize the stu- 
dents,"-, Wyar on Student Body Week. 



Groups & Greeks 



147 



Alpha Sigma Tau 



The "Taus" participate in many cannpus 
octivites and sponsor a Bloodmobile each 
semester. 

First Row:(L to R) Lisa Amorso, Michelle 
Beam, Kelly Grady, Erin Hrabovsky. Sec- 
ond Row: Jen Davidson, Amy Turk, 
Gretchen Reagle, Kelly Emmett, Andrea 
Spinola, Stacy Burk, Anna Johnson, Third 
Row: Tina Tozzi, Cathy McConnell (Secre- 
tary), Teri Lee, Jennifer Goodrich, Gretch- 
en Litzinger, Matthew Tarr (Tau Tiger), An- 
drea McCracken, Sandy Lynn, Michelle 
Williams, Shannon Korastury. Fourth Row: 
Robin Mulig, Dianna Cameron, Shelley Mu- 
lig. Sue Prezel (Treasurer), Holly Kanten- 
wein, Mary Jo Hughes, Kerry Anderson, 
Beth Lawson Fifth Row: Jennifer Yaple, 
Shelly DePalma, Melissa Sherwood, Barb 
Phillips, Susan DiVecchio, Deanne Shelen- 
berger (President), Beth Toth, Mary Pe- 
duzzi, Jan Fischerkeller, Lori Rider, 



Alpha Chi Rho 



Alpha Chi Rho prides themselves in their 
scholarship program as well as numerous 
community service projects. 

First Row:(L to R) Stanley Smith, Michael 
Affolter, Keith Schultz, John Herriott, Steve 
Raisley, Todd McClain, Mark Hazlett (Sec- 
retary), Gene Witton Second Row: Chris 
Cancelmi, Scott Graybill, Rob Theiss, Scott 
Mellon (Treasurer), Tim Walsh, Bruce Nel- 
son, Tom Knights, Doug Giles, Fred Mon- 
tanaro, Mike Davis (Vice President), Todd 
DeCapite, Scott Atwell (President), Jason 
Lesher, Scot Reed, Doug Roberts, Bob Har- 
rison. 




Delta Zeta 



The Delta Zeta sorority sets high aca- 
demic standards Their philanthropy 
benefits the speech and hearing 
impaired. 

First Row:(L to R) Sharon Hixson (President), 
Lucy Bolph, Debbie Kempko. Cherie Butts, 
Lori White, Amy Taylor, Valerie Beveridge, 
Lori Grain, Dawn Burk, Kelli Porterfield, 
Cherie Rogers (Vice President) Second 
Row: Lisa Wolker, Kareno McCarthy, Ja- 
mie Bero (Advisor), Michelle Jordan, Shan- 
non Carr, Kelly Klouss, Lisa Zeljak (secre- 
tary). Condi Salvini, Nikki Green, Kristin 
Spring, Mary Davis Third Row: Vicki Hoff- 
man, Michelle Jurkovic, Christine Hilter- 
man, Yvonne Keyes, Bobbi Jo Gargasz, 
Heather Connelley, Missy Moscatelli, Brid- 
get Villani, Patty Dailey, Liz Mollik. Fourth 
Row; Tammy Sheffler, Beth Swasta. Nicole 
Remich, Sue Keas, Julio Scheel, Beth Hack- 
bort, Stephanie Woytko, Jill Wensel, Janet 
Strahler, Debbie Bregar, Denise O'Connor, 
Janice Bish, Melinda Sudik, Robin Martin. 








■^ Groups & Greeks 



148 



Kaleidoscope 

Of 

Interest 




Groups & Greeks 



Delta Phi Epsilon 



The "D Phi E's" can be seem wearing 
the colors royal purple and pure gold. 
They pride themselves on close 
sisterhood. 

First Row:(L to I?) Lorroine LoRocco, Mi- 
chelle Christopher, Laurie Waltman (Trea- 
surer). Tracy Moore, Susan Morgan, Beth 
Bushyeoger, Vicki Bell, Heather Weyman 
Second Row: Amy Krakenberg, Joanna 
Russell, Kristin Deorney, Leann Solesky, Ta- 
moro Schnur, Christine Cornoli, Gretchen 
Bathurst. Alysio Betres, Stoci Healey. Third 
Row: Sue Alexander, Elizabeth Emier (Pres- 
ident), Cathy Getz, Mickey Brest, Mau- 
reen Cain, Michelle Griebel, Alyse Dippold, 
Kim Brustle, Fourth Row: Alison Cappob- 
lanco. Kristo Franz, Jennifer Bongers, 
MoryAnn Joy, Krista Marcin. Sheila Schwa- 
benbauer. Amy Rhodes, Stacey Levy, 
Amy Tafi, 



Delta Chi 



Delta Chi strives for high academic 
achievement and strong charity support. 
They have a successful run for Special 
Olympics every year 

First Row:(L to R) Jerry Palmer, Mike Clack, 
Les Kephart (President), David Vioral, Le- 
roy Thomas, Mike Zelenski, Rich Lansberry. 
Second Row: Declan Sullivan, Mike Bates, 
Joe Smay, Ed Unitis (Treasurer), Andy 
Hornberger,"Shoe", Jeff Conner, Don Wa- 
silko. Third Row: Paul Krous, Todd Plummer, 
John Spare, Greg Starr, Bob Whitman, 
Chris Jones, David Worek, Tim Linch, Erik 
Luhrs, Bill Baker, Rob Ailing, 



r 




unn A r^ A a An 



^ r 





Theta Chi 



Theta Chi is a national fraternity which 
prides itself on strong brotherhood and 
unity. Theta Chi has been here at Clarion 
ever since 1960 

Front Row:(L to R) Dan Coccio, Marc 
Wolfe, John Bronico, Tim Artman, Chris 
DeStefano Second Row Mike Steber, Ja- 
son Runsy, Jack Shroder, Al Formon, Joe 
Perhach, Joe Murphy, Talben Meyers 
Third Row Bob Stein, Rob Linenger, Bob 
Tuten (Vice President), Ron Lieb, Dave 
Herzog, Joe Lechman, Sal Paple, Bob Wise 
(Treasurer). Fourth Row Matt DeJulio, Ken 
Fry (President) 




Groups 8c Greel<s 



150 





Questions 

Ending Hazing 

The Greek system has become an inte- 
gral part of most universities. Clarion being 
no exception. Any Greek organization 
should foster the traditional values of 
brotherhood and sisterhood and the tradi- 
tional activities of fund-raising, charity 
work, parties, and pledging, or should it? 

Traditions are changing among Clari- 
on's Greek organizations. Under fire from 
Nationals and their insurance companies, 
several fraternities are highly regarding al- 
ternatives to pledging. The roots of 
pledging hove been shaken sufficiently 
enough to prompt Diana Anderson, Direc- 
tor of Greek Life, to suggest that tradition- 
al pledging may be gone from several 
fraternities by fall 1989, 

At the head of the push to end pledg- 
ing are alumni who are concerned wUh 
the lawsuits and revocations of charters 
due to the hazing that sometimes accom- 
panies pledging. According to Anderson, 
the conception that pledging must in- 
volve hazing is a myth, "We're trying to 
demythologize the 'Animal House' im- 
age." Anderson, along with the Interfra- 
ternity Council, and Panhellenic Council, 
has begun an anti-hazing workshop tar- 
geted toward pledges (associate 
members). 

The goals of the workshop are to alert 
associate members to what constitutes 
hazing, how hazing is unnecessary, and 
how it actually is counter to the ideas for 
which the fraternity is striving. The asso- 
ciate members can then recognize when 
they ore being hazed and eliminate their 
own hazing when they become active 
members. "We're fighting tradition," says 
Anderson. "My challenge is to educate 
the groups so that it (pledge programs) 
can still be fun and challenging, but not 
hazing." 

Two associate/pledge classes have 
been through the workshops, which are 
required for all associate members. Ac- 
cording to several pledges, the work- 
shops gave them new insights into the re- 
lationship between pledging and hazing 
and the workshop would affect the way 
they handled pledges later. 

The tide seems to be turning across the 
country concerning the longstanding tra- 
dition of pledging. Will current Clarion stu- 
dents witness the end of traditonal pledg- 
ing? Will pledging a fraternity mean 
bettering the organization in the process? 
Will Clarion chapters bow to Nationals, 
alumni and insurance company pressure? 
We will all be able to answer these ques- 
tions very soon. 

-Dan Dieter 

-Page Design By Wendy Sue 
Wieland 



A Sequelle photographer captures 
these two Taus in an interview. 



A fun-filled day spent at a Greek 
function with friends. 



Groups & Greeks 



151 



•^^ 



Zeta Tau Alpha 



Zeta Tau Alpha, who stress strong moral 
character and everlasting friendships in 
their sorority, also support the Juvenile Di- 
abetes Fund and the Association for Re- 
tarded Citizens. 

First Row;(L to R) L. DeLisio (Secretary), L 
DeSantis, C. Serafini, M Shall, M Elsodat, L, 
Kidder (President), E Dryer. M, Botti, K 
Habtbauer. A. Elliott Second Row: A. Pan- 
ucci, J. Zimmerman. C Malizia, D DeMar- 
chi, L. Zimmerman, B. Alberta. A. Covatto. 
R Wisniewski, L, Audio. J, Detore. S. Ny- 
gard (ZTA Sweetheart). F. Raff els. B He- 
trick. L Mclndoe. S, Tudor. L. Williams, C, 
Baker, S, Bronowicz, S. Sprankle. Third 
Row B. Gumto, M. Davis. D, Maroney, J. 
Kennedy. T Appelt. S, Evanoff (Treosurer). 
S Kearney. A. Opal. M Biesiadny. J, John- 
son. I, Barker, L, Marino, M. Green. L Mar- 
ston, T. Ramirez, L. Goodrich, P Ramsey 



Kappa Delta Rho 



Kappa Delta Rho values physical fitness, 
good times, and academic survival in their 
fraternity Having earned a reputation of 
being the closest fraternity at Clarion, the 
Kappa's invite prospective pledges to 
"take the challenge". 

Front Row:(L to R) Kevin Schefferii, Scotty 
Brown, Donnie Allen. Jimy Lee Arbogast, 
Ju-Hyung Lee, Kenny Myers, Chris Purdy, 
Stuart Stanbro, Second Row: Carl Winner. 
Kristopher King. Mike Bradley, John Boy 
Neidich (President), Michaeline Botti 
(Sweetheart), Jerry Joyce, Bob Kinchloe 
Third Row: Gregory Zak, Ron Bickel, Brian 
"Nacho" Kiefer, Eric Mitcheltree. Ron 
Sheffer, Todd McMillen, Brian Burford, Mike 
McGaughey (Secretary), Sam Briggs. 



Lamda Zeta Tau 



Lambda Zeta Tau is the newest sorority 
on Clarion's campus, just recently found- 
ed on March 29, 1988 The sorority, whose 
colors are royal blue and dusty rose, is a 
new addition to the Greek system The 
sisterhood has high hopes for a bright and 
prosperous future at Clarion, 

Front Row:(L to R) Kathy McCartneel, Sa- 
rah Kniselil. Pattie Leithalf, Liz Colleran, 
Marcy Pracek, Lisa Bradel, Rebecca Sav- 
age, Melanie Stroh, Nanci Warner. Beverly 
Blank, Amy Sloan. DeAnn Bernotos. Sec- 
ond Row: Betti Peoples. Tracey Robert- 
son. Renee Toth, Shayne Hurd, Shelly 
Rhoodes, Michele Longenecker, Kris Re- 
plogle. Heather Karr, Tammy Alcantar, 
Beth Westerman, Carrie Hunt, Third Row 
Barb Chambers, Jackie Boigt (Vice Presi- 
dent), Ann Mane Simmers (President), 
Biyth Boyer, Cathy Collins. Elizabeth 
Bedner. Colleen Stevens. Sandy Bish. An- 
gle Caridi. Kathleen Praznik, Lisa Henry. 
Becky McCabe (Secretary), Chris Peter- 
son, 





^'^ AA *» A /I A ^ '^Ai* 



!S.V.-J«LJlJIU«IB» 






Groups 8c Greeks 



152 



i0- 




New Program 

CUP Ambassadors 



Sue McMillen, Associate Direc- 
tor of Admissions, thinks tlie uni- 
versity has something worthwhile 
to offer. So do about 200 under- 
graduate students who attend 
here full-time. They are all part of 
the Ambassadors or a big broth- 
er/sister program being set up for 
upcoming freshmen. The pur- 
pose: to ease new students here 
at Clarion. 

Most of us know the frustrations 
of being a new student. New stu- 
dents must learn about many as- 
pects of college life. Such impor- 
tant areas include learning about 
the academic departments, 
adapting to residence life, and 
learning about social life on cam- 
pus. What many upperclassmen 
take for granted can be a bur- 
den or perplexity to the most in- 
novative freshmen. 

This new organization has got- 
ten off to a great start and has a 
number of programs and socials 
planned for next year such as: 
time management seminar, intro- 
duction to all the services offered 
to the student body, and a meet- 
ing with the registrar to discuss 
the procedure of drop/add, ice 
cream social, and holiday parties. 

Sue McMillen adds, "Clarion 
University Ambassadors is a group 
of young people who hove 
reached out to our freshman 
class of 1989 in a kind and a sup- 
portive way. The success of the 
outreach program lies entirely in 
the hands of the Ambassadors. 
The big's relationship with their lit- 
tles will ultimately keep people in 
school and produce a happy stu- 
dent body. The admission staff is 
greatly appreciates voluntarism 
of these fine people." 

-Compiled By Wendy Wieland 

-Articles By Mike Carey, Dawn 
Gill, and Doug Roote 

-Page Design By Wendy 
Wieland 



Mike Carey states, "Everyone is excited about the wliole tiling, and I wish this great program lots of 
luck!" 



Groups &. Greeks 



153 



Sigma Phi Epsilon 



Sigma Phi Epsilon strives towards excel- 
lence in the classroom and community. 

First Row:(L to R) A, Reedy. M. Yoder. D. 
Mastrangelo. S, Frank. C. Carver, D. 
Haines. J Doemling, G. Wintersgill (Vice 
President). D. Martino. D, Wolfe. D 
McGovi/en, Second Row: R, Smith, D. Dia- 
mond (President). D, Stouffer, M, Kelson, 
G, Gerlach. M. Perloski, K, Cecchini, S, Bi- 
bro. J Reiter. G, Pearson, Third Row: J, 
Miller, S, Griffith. B Hegburg (Secretary). B, 
Dunlay, P Lucas Forth Row: M. Cogley, S, 
Inglese. R Dopkosky. M. Pearson. 



Sigma Sigma Sigma 



Tri Sigma is the oldest sorority on cam- 
pus that promotes a lifetime of friendships 



First Row (L to R) D, Kilancinski. A Prosser. 
B. Cartwright. P Cypher. E Dougherty. S 
Kennedy. K. Swob, C Chandley. M, Kap- 
pel. M lovorone. T Gruca, Second Row: 
K Anthony. S Youngwireth (Vice Presi- 
dent), V, Timet. W Stewart. K Rodziewicz 
(Secretary), M. Freimuth. A, Dzadony. M 
Yanchak. K Prox, C, Slezok, J, Crawford. 
A. Linder, Third Row A thaner, N, Brown, J. 
Konopasek, S McGovern. S, Patterson. J, 
Peldowski. K Foix. C Williams. M. Street, S 
Fitzpatrick. T Conner, M. Dean Fourth 
Row: J, Keslar (President), L. Wachtel, A. 
Anderson. R Lofink. M. Lesh. L, Svonavec, 
E, Cook, T Lopinski, H. Sommers P, Bleggi, 
L, Fannin. D. Crandall, M Dutill, M. McGer- 
vey, J. Kunkle 



Sigma Tau 



Sigma Tau is a local fraternity on cam- 
pus that stresses high standard of educa- 
tion, honorable social living, and partici- 
pation in extra-curricular activities 

1988-1989 Roster Deno Castolano. Jeff 
Clutter (Treasurer). Dave Cowden. Ken 
DiMatfeo, George Downy (Secretary). Bo 
Hamlet. Steve Horvat. Paul Kotek. Mark 
Lersh. Bill Liewellyn. Damon Pietronigo 
(President). Ken Smakula. Tim Smith. Lou 
Weiers. Larry Wisenboch (Vice President) 




Groups & Greeks 



154 




IFC 



Brotherhood 

The Inter-Fraternity Council is 
the governing body of Clarion's 
Fraternities. It is composed of del- 
egates from each fraternity. The 
council responsibility to promote 
cooperation and coordinate the 
membership drives (rush), mem- 
bership education (pledging), 
and to provide educational and 
social programs related to Greek 
life. Annual events include the 
Welcome Back Dance, Spring 
Carnival, Greek Week, and vari- 
ous other philanthropic projects. 

-Paul Solosky 
-Page Design By 
Wendy Wieland 



X 1 \m^ "# 



\. V if 




The 1989 Inter-Fraternity Counc 
Too much time on our hands. 
Up a tree without a paddle. 



Melinda Sudik 



Groups &. Greeks 



155 



Sigma Chi 



Sigma Chi is a social and service fraternity, 
active in all phases of college life. This 
diverse group of men are especially 
proud of our fund raisers for local charities 
and organizations, as well as Wallace Vil- 
lage for disabled children. 

First Row;(L to R) Joe Mason, "The Sheik", 
Ben Dover (Vice President), Yvonne Keyes 
(Sweetheart), Daniel Fulkerson, Mark Mar- 
raccini, Mike DeMartinis. Second Row; Paul 
Wolenski, Matt Cady. Patrick Crow, Mike 
Blouch, Tony Ferretti, Mike Rodi, Steve 
Gangloff, Matt Mclntyre, Drew Carac- 
ciolo. Third Row Chip Krempa (Secre- 
tary), Tony Miller, Todd Evans, Pete Del- 
lane, Jim Parker, Brian Ziemke, David 
Ziocik, Jim Hornidge. Fourth Row: Peter B. 
McMillen, Kurt Moyer (President), Marty 
Bostrom, Gregory DiBiase (Treasurer), 
Chad Lane, Dave Klima, Greg Carl, 
Michael Hrabovsky, Michael Williams. 



Tau Kappa Epsilon 



The Lambda Epsilon chapter of TKE has 
existed twenty-two years on the Clarion 
campus. This fraternity pride's themselves 
on their brotherhood and friendships. They 
believe that the essential elements of true 
brotherhood are love, charity and 
esteem. 

First Row:(L to R) Robert Todorowski (Vice 
President), Tucker Snyder #8 Second 
Row: Michel Morgan, Geoff Gray, Michael 
Popella, Glenn Yocca, Brad Phillips, Tom 
Melson, Durant Hehr, Kevin Conners, Third 
Row: Ray Bodnar, Tim Camas, Gary Bishop 
(President). David Mash, Bill Schultz (Trea- 
surer), "Skipster", 
"Dirty D" (Secretary), Tom Netzel. 




Phi Sigma 



Phi Sigma has gained a reputation of 
being Clarion's closest fraternity. Physical 
fitness, good times, and academic surviv- 
al are just a few of their values, "Take the 
challenge," 

Front Row:(R to L) Ed Cyphers (Treasurer), 
Tim D'Amico, Anh Nguyen, David Reich, 
Dan Veneziale Second Row: Joe Mozza, 
Ronald Amato (President), Paul Liprando 
(Secretary), John Marasco (Vice Presi- 
dent), Mike Harris, James Gibson. 



mim—i liivKn <-- . — ':»^v 







t I* \ i 




156 



Groups & Greeks 




PANHELL 

Together in Sisterhood 

The Panhellenic Council is the 
governing body of the sororities, 
composed of delegates from 
each sorority. It is their responsibil- 
ity to promote cooperation and 
to coordinate the membership 
selection (rush), membership 
education (pledging), and to 
provide educational and social 
programs related to Greek life. 
Annual events include Welcome 
Back Dance, Spring Carnival, 
Greek Week, and various 
phlanthropic projects, 

-Paul Solosky 
-Page Design By 
Wendy Wieland 



Sisterhood is what its all about. 

Delta Sigma Theta - Looking for a few 
I good women. 



^ AHA AA 





"'lOtlUSEMKB THE TORCH Of .ISDON- 



The 1989 Panhellenic Council 



Groups &, Greel<s 



157 



Phi Sigma 
Kappa 



Phi Sigma Kappa pride themselves on 
scholarship and brotherhood - 
Back Row(R to L):P Solosky.B Dickson.D 
Hernon.B Blaha.B Sonders.D Attenberger.S 
Pegram.C Anderson.D Oliver.C Miller.D 
Spencer.D Flaherty.M Sebunio.J Tomlin- 
son.G Ozimek.A Sayers. Third Row:D No- 
lan.A Meyer.T Lynn.R Harper.T Britton.S 
Maxwell.B Wyar.D Fetzner.V Foura.K Ge- 
phart.C Horner.E Dombroski.J Fronco.G 
Fischer, Second Row T McCulloughJ Wil- 
liams, E Brown, N Austriaco.R Schupp.T 
McMeans.T Trone.J Augustine, A Miller, J 
Shearer.D Bishop.N lavarone,D Busch,J 
Thompson Front Row:D Girts, M Oden- 
wald.B Bradshaw,R Cincala,K Romine,C 
Brough.C Vosler,M Shoulder.D Peyton.G 
Bachner.M Miller, B Delucio.T Draper, M 
Geyer. 



Phi Sigma 
Sigma 



Phi Sigma Sigma is not only active in 
greek and campus activities, but also 
raises money tor the National Kidney 
Foundation every semester- 
First Row:(L to R)C Gorsuch.K HeiLM 
Sweet,K Black,J Gross,D Gross.C Young, N 
Czap. Second RowT Fiscus.W Ott,A Fred- 
ley, S Hesidence.E Thurs,S RocccM Tarr.M 
Davis,M Hoffman. Third RowJ Joyce,K 
Meyers, C Wagner, M Zimmerman, B Picco- 
lo, S Anderson, G Laspina,S Osburn.D Brat- 
ter(President),D Muroski, Fourth Row:D 
Geyer(Treasurer),D Glivic(Secretary),K 
Hudak,G Cole, A Dennis, M Ross,V Tyson, C 
Eaton, Fifth Row;B Braunbeck,R Ewas- 
key,M Major(Vice President),B MitcheiP 
Reynolds, G Guy,L Paczkowski,J Johnston, J 
Greer, J Maine, L Page 



Accounting 
Club 



The Accounting Club is a business-ori- 
ented club and affliated with the North- 
west Keystone Chapter of the Notional 
Association of Accountants, The main 
purpose of the club is to broaden the edu- 
cation and interest of accounting stu- 
dents and to expose them to the ac- 
counting profession. 

Front Row,(L to R):Lori Blake, Vicki Heck- 
man, Morci Keatly, Mickey Vensel(VP of 
Membership),Jennifer Heyl(Treasurer), Mi- 
chelle Rocco, Jayne Means, Terry Mot- 
vey(Secretary) Back RowSue Turchick, 
Lisa Cooper(Career Placement Liaison), 
Wendy Wagner, Mono Ritz, Gregory Di- 
Bicse. Paul Grancey, Stacy Bean. Rex Fi- 
sher(VP of Public Relations). James Med- 
vit(President) 




|ii p ii' urvi- 



i immmnm^^num 



rtAA 





iSU 



Groups 8c Greeks 



158 




GREEKS 

DELTA SIGMA THETA 
KAPPA ALPHA PSI 

Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Inc. 
was founded January 13, 1913 at 
Howard University in Wasliington 
D.C. Twenty Two women found- 
ed this public service sorority and 
today there are over 175 thou- 
sand members and 750 chapters 
across the United States and in 
the Republics of Haiti and Liberia 
as well OS West Germany and the 
Virgin Islands. Clarion University 
has seen two chapters of D.S.T, 
and is presently a part of Pitts- 
burgh's city chapter Theta Beta. 
The advisor is Dr. B. Cummings. 

Kappa Alpha Psi was founded 
January 5, 191 1 at Indiana Univer- 
sity, Bloomington, Indiana under 
the theme: Training For Leader- 
ship. Kappa Alpha Psi promotes a 
style of intellectual and aesthetic 
evaluation for more than 80,000 
college men rooted in a genuine 
concern for human develop- 
ment. The Kappa Gestalt exhorts 
its members to stretch them- 
selves in all directions while hold- 
ing fast to a sustaining principle of 
achievement. 

-Compiled By Maureen 
Freimuth 

-Page Design By W. Wieland 




DELTA SIGMA THETA SORORITY: 
Lisa Arp and Crystal Blanding 



KAPPA ALPHA PSI PATERNITY Lin- 
wood Harris. 



Groups &, Greeks 



459 



A.C.M. 



The student chapter of the Association 
for Computing Machinery provides stu- 
dents with the opportunity to learn about 
new ideas in the field of computer sci- 
ence. The group's activities include guest 
speakers, weekly meetings, field trips, 
corporate tours, fund reisers, and socials 
Anyone interested is welcome to join. 

Front Row:(L to R) Steven Konopa, Janet 
Cressman (Vice President), Sumeet Singh, 
Scott Wentzel, Paul Cupec, Cliff Himes 
(Secretory & Treasurer), Mike Kuhno (Pres- 
ident), Back Row John Crispin, George 
Thomas, Dr. Wimer, Dave Hortman, Andy 
Say. Karl Burns, Michael Barrett (Advisor). 



A.M.A. 



The American Marketing Association is 
a professional organization The Clarion 
University chapter is recognized as one of 
the Outstanding Eastern Region Colle- 
giate chapters in the nation. The purpose 
is to advance professional knowledge in 
the marketing field through guest speak- 
ers, field trips, and employment fairs 

Front Row;(L to R) Yolando Bongiovonni, 
MaryAnn Yanchok, Debra McAdams 
(President), Joseph Stitman (Vice Presi- 
dent), Laura Feldmeier, Michelle Kaputa 
Back Row Kimberly Burford, Carol Mar- 
ianne, Jeanette Budd. David Hrivnak, 
Christopher Golemi. Christine Plumb, 
Meaghan Hrabovsky. 







'^ JL .Q 




American Society for 
Personnel Administration 



The American Society for Personnel Ad- 
ministration is open to any student with on 
interest in human resource management. 
The group, sponsored by the Pittsburgh 
Personnel Association, promotes learning 
Through interaction with professionals from 
'he personnel field and other various 
chapter activities The group's goal is to 
develop professional personnel adminis- 
trators for the future 

Front Row:(L to R) Deb Stohl. Julie Rapsinski 
(Treasurer). Katie Noir (President). Debro 
Kotula. Beth Bowman Back Row: Art 
Johnson, Kevin McCormick, Tom Finnerty. 
Poul Grancey, Rob Taylor. Jeff Werner, 
Don McClintock 



i, 1 r- 1 



n ^ .R 




Groups & Greeks 



160 









National 

Conference 



From February 23 to the 26, 1989 Clari- 
on University Inter Fraternal Council and 
the Ponheilenic Council sent seven repre- 
sentatives to the 1989 Ponheilenic and In- 
ter Fraternity annual conference at the 
Westin Wiiiionn Penn Hotel in Pittsburgh. 
The theme of the conference vi/os "Cross- 
roads to the Future," The theme reflected 
the ongoing changes that are currently 
occuring in the Greek world. With tougher 
anti-hozing lows and an increased avi/ore- 
ness of risk management, fraternities and 
sororities are having to better educate 
themselves. 

The conference is the annual meeting 
for all of the Northeastern Schools. Greeks 
from West Virginia to Washington DC. 
and OS far North as Maine met in Pitts- 
burgh. The conference is designed to help 
Greeks get together to exchange ideas 
and learn about new programs that ore 
offered to Greek Councils. Over 40 work- 
shops were presented for the delegates 
to attend. They began at 8:30 in the 
morning and finished about 7:30 at night. 
The workshops covered a large area. 
From off-campus chapter houses to per- 
sonal leadership skills seminars, the dele- 
gates were able to obtain a large 
amount of information which they brought 
back to Clarion and their fraternities and 
sororities. Many well known individuals of 
the Greek world such as William Keim from 
Oregon State, Barbie Tootle from Ohio 
State, and Chuck White of Sigma Phi Epsi- 
lon were on hand to speak and share their 
knowledge and experience. The Dele- 
gates attended the conference with Di- 
ana Anderson of Clarion's Director of 
Greek Life and Special Services Program. 

-Paul Solosky 

-Page Design By Staff 





^ 



V 



The Delta Zetas apply what 
they've learn in recruiting. 

A strong development of sister- 
hood IS what it is all about. 

Melonie Hoffman explains about 
the conference. 



Groups 8c Greeks 



1.61 



Arete 



This organization joins together students 
who are members of the Honors program 
with any student with a good academic 
standing. The group provides exposure to 
professional activities in many fields. 

Front Row:( L to R) Kimberley Bush, Tammy 
Pears, Sue Peters, Georgina Klanica Sec- 
ond Row Nancy Rieder (Sophomore Vice 
President), Michele Orf (Secretary), Lyn- 
nette Wimer, Korina Blose, Jayne Means 
(Treasurer), Third Row Keith Brosious, Mi- 
chele Sonney, John Bower (President), 
Christopher Fenn, Harry Johnson, Brian 
McGoey (Freshman Vice President). 




A.U.S.A. 



The Association of the United States 
Army promotes knowledge of the army 
among its members by scheduling guest 
speakers, field trips, skeet shoots, athele- 
tic night, and a wine and cheese party 

Front Row:(L to R) Jennifer Larson, Chris- 
tine Kropcho (Secretary), Jeff Heosley 
(Vice President), Kerry Anderson (Presi- 
dent), Michelle Morko (Treasurer), Melinda 
Sudik, John Larawoy, Back Row: MAJ Jef- 
frey Emory (Advisor), Scott McAnallen, Bri- 
an Wilson, Brian Bradshaw, Jeff Roth, Carl 
Anderson, Craig Kushner, MSJ Alvin Jasper 
(Advisor). 




B.A.C.C.H.U.S. 



The purpose of Boost Alcohol Conscious 
Concerning the Health of University Stu- 
dents is to provide prevention efforts to 
help alleviate the problem of alcohol mis- 
use and abuse, increasing awareness and 
educating of healthy alternatives. All stu- 
dents are invited to become a member 
and play an important role in promoting 
alcohol responsiblity 

Front Row:(L to R) Bob Sadzinski, Ellen Perl- 
man (President), Karen Kauffman, Erin Dris- 
coll. Back Row: Michelle Davis, Missy Zim- 
merman, Stacy Bean, Elana Exier, Michelle 
Watts, Liso poyle. 




16 




■roups 8c Greeks 




Fraternities 

Boastful Brotherhood 

Fraternities at Clarion University 
ot Pennsylvania have been a long 
standing tradition. With the 
strong principles of Brotherhood 
leadership and honor. Clarion fra- 
ternities have put in hundreds of 
hours of community service v\/ith 
such events as the Junior Olym- 
pics and Walkothons for several 
childrens hospitals. Clarion's fra- 
ternities excel because of the di- 
versification of their members. 
Fraternity brothers have 
achieved high honors outside of 
the Greek life in such areas as stu- 
dent senators, presidents, and 
vice presidents of service and 
honorary fraternities and they 
have also excelled in Clarion 
sports teams. Under a strong Inter 
Fraternity Council vje have had 
fun and competitive Greek 
Week and the introduction of the 
Spring Carnivals. With nine na- 
tional and two local fraternities 
Clarion con boast a strong and 
united fraternities system. 

-Paul Solosky 

-Page Design By Wendy 
Wieland 



Greek Week gathers all of 
the fraternities together in a 
little friendly competition. 



Groups & Greeks 



163 



Black Student Union 



Clarion University's Baick Student Union 
is an organization dedicated to promot- 
ing the knowledge of Black issues and cul- 
tural awareness to the campus and the 
students. The group does this by sponsor- 
ing social end academic programs These 
programs are open to the campus and 
the community. 

Front Row:(L to R) Todd Jackson (Chair of 
Academic Retention), Crystal Blanding 
(Vice President), Back Row: La Quitta 
Howard-Johnson (Co-Advisor), Rau- 
sheyed Rollins (Treasurer), Gary Moore 
(Co-Advisor). 




*vj^^ 




Bios Club 



The Bios Club is composed of twenty 
active members, some of which ore not 
biology majors. The club's major activity is 
termed Slave Days, which takes place 
during the fall During this time, the mem- 
bers work for local residents doing yard 
chores to raise funds for group activities 

Front Row (L to R) Kim Ingram (Secretary). 
Mark Stello, Janeen Czolba, Becky Aut, 
Noreen Lewis, Kurt von Kleist. Back Row: 
Bob Borer, Shawn Ritts (President), Bill 
Evens, Marcio Dolan (Treasurer), Jacqui 
Blaine, Dr. Zelienski, Dr. Dolby, Deena Bar- 
nett. 



Clarion Call 



The Clarion Call is the university's stu- 
dent run newspaper. This group operates 
as a business, paying bills and receiving 
revenues from local and national 
advertisers. 

Fron Row:(L to R) Christina Richter (Fea- 
tures Editor), Tom Forsey (Advertising Edi- 
tor), Kelley Broadurst (Editor-in-chief), Jo- 
seph Doemling (Business Manager), Joy 
Winters (News Editor) Back Row Peter B. 
McMillen (Photography Editor), "The 
Duck", Pamela Reynolds (Ad Design Edi- 
tor). 




Groups 8c Greeks 



164 




Competition 

Greek Week 

Once again Greeks battled it 
out in the waters ot Tippin, the 
stage of Marwick-Boyd, the play- 
ing field of Ralston, and, of 
course, the streets of Clarion. The 
Greeks went head to head in 
various and myriad competitions 
and events. The nine contests in- 
cluded Greek Sing, Creation of a 
Banner, a Blood Drive, Bowling, 
Swimming, Volleyball, Running, 
Scholarship Level, and Field Olym- 
pics. After o week of close battle, 
the overall winners for the soror- 
ities were Phi Sigma Sigma and for 
the fraternities were Phi Sigma 
Kappa. 

-Paul Solosky 

-Page Design By Wendy Sue 
Wieland 




^^mi 



Phi Sigma Kappa turtle rises to 
the occasion. 

The Taus pull their strengths 
together. 

Tri-Sigs show their sisterly love. 



Groups &. Greeks 



• 0^-^ 



465 



French Club 



The French Club sponsors and reviews 
current French films, holds discussions that 
relate to the francophone sphere of influ- 
ence, co-sponsors activities vi/ith the Inter- 
national Student Association, and attends 
activites outside of Clarion, These field 
trips include trips to Pittsburgh and Cleve- 
land to study cultural events or exhibits 

Front Row;(L to R) Krista Bishop, Karina 
Blose (President), Pamela Tvi/igg, Cheryl 
Dehner Bacl< Row Megan Myford, Erin 
Hartle, Felice Walker, Susan Catalano, Kirk 
Doran 



German Club 



The German Club is open to anyone 
interested in German-speaking countries, 
their culture, and people The groups ac- 
tivities include Total Immersion German 
Weekends at the McKeever Center, ex- 
cursions, sponsoring German films on cam- 
pus, sponsoring speakers, preparing Ger- 
man food for picnics, and numerous other 
activities. 

Front Row:(L to R) Amy Sippel, Chris Can- 
iglia, Denise Humes, Rolsaw Puval, Erika 
Kluesener, Kirk Doran, Eberhard Yelmardt. 



Health Careers Club 



The Health Careers Club consists of stu- 
dents interested in the health field 

Front Row:(L to R) Holly Peters, Kathy Le- 
one, Noreen Lewis, Angelina Colton (Sec- 
retary), Betsy Weingartner (Treasurer), 
Lorraine LaRocca, Chelly Grabowski, Gar- 
gara Coles (President), Back Row. Kulbir 
Rangi, Rebecca Aut, Barb Erdesky, An- 
drea lonadi, Scot Reed, Robin Myers. Car- 
ol Valosek, Mary Ann Joy (Vice President), 
Lisa Pugne 




7; J mi 




Groups &, Greeks 



166 



///////'f^'" 




Recognized 

Hard Working Girls 



on Thfnine sororities under the 
?Snr.ellenic council ore the leod- 

inn force on our campus. The so 
routes iend hundreds ot hours 
°pon?orSg end he-P'^g -J^J;^- 
thropic and community services. 
They are also helping ra.e he se- 
rial consciousness of Clarion uy 
sponsoring workshops on do^e re- 

in+inns and promoting <breeKs 
'Cinst^he Mis Management of 
A?cohol (GAMMA). With these ef- 
fo?t° and the development of 
no ion sororities are leading the 
Say ?he° outstanding work was 
Tecogn-zed at the t989 Northeast 

Panh?llenic Conference held in 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 

-.Xe*Design By Wendy 

Wieland 



These two Zetas show off their 

letters. 

On spring break these Ph,S,grna 

?igma Sisters celebrate the 

occasion. 









This bunch of Delta Zetas is 
ready to tackle anything in their 



Groups 8t Greeks 



167 



I.A.B.C. 



The Inrernational Association of Business 
Communicators, commonly referred to as 
I.A.B.C, is a student cliapter that is recog- 
nized with a professional organization in 
Pittsburgh. Members of this group attend 
a conference in the fall, publish o newslet- 
ter once each semester and sponser 
many communication activities. 

First Row:(L to R) Jen Houllion (Secretary), 
Jill Fitterer Second Row: Tess Pusl<ar, Tom 
Osegueda. Third Row: Dana Takach (Co- 
President), Paul Acimio, Lori Rider (Co- 
President). Mrs, Wilson (Advisor). 



InterHall Council provides a centralized 
body for all of the on-campus residents as 
an organized way of dealing with matters 
concerning those residents. InterHall spon- 
sors several campus events, such as hall 
competitions and a dance marathon for 
the American Cancer Society. They are 
also responsible for the beloved fruit bas- 
kets students recieve the week before 
finals week. 

Front Row:(L to R) Lori Berk, Kristy Satta- 
zahn (Secretary). Phil Carbo (Vice Presi- 
dent), Jennifer Kunkle (President). Back 
Row: Dawnne Hetrick, Laura Sippos, Tom 
Burke, Dan Ryan, Debbie Devore, Pam 
McDonald. 



L.M.I.S.S. 



The Library Media and Information Sci- 
ence Society offers its members opportu- 
nities to advance their professional knowl- 
edge in Library Science through various 
service and social activities. 

Front Row:(L to R) Gayle Marhefka, Liz 
Gowne, Lorrie Mosier (Secretary), Mary 
Salony (President), Jean Thomas, Mary 
Carter (Vice President). Back Row: Jenni- 
fer Bertovich, Pamela Nevling, Lori Clos- 
son, Suzanne Wallace, Dean Rekich (Trea- 
surer), Nancy Jacobs, Colleen Bredl. 





Q ^ 




Groups 8c Greeks 



168 




Announcing 



The "Alphies" 

Alpha Psi Omega holds an an- 
nual spring banquet where 
awards (similar to the Grammies) 
ore given to participants of the 
theatre department. This year on 
April 28 the winners were an- 
nounced, and the were as 
follows: 

Outstanding Actor in a Student 
Directed Show . . , David Fry 
Outstanding Actress in a Student 
Directed Show . . . Robert Fix 
Outstanding Student Directed 
Show . . , "Good Doctor" 
Male Cameo . . . David Fry 
Female Cameo . . . Paulo Morcink 
Stage Manager , . . Sonde Kuzio 
Supporting Actor . . . Franl< 
Scherer 

Supporting Actress . . . Lisa Walker 
Set Design . . , Robert Levy 
Costume Design . , . Steve Dillie 
Lighting Design . . . Craig Pratt 
Actor . , . Robert Fix 
Actress . . . Vanessa Singleton 
New Talent . , . Annie Yost 
Best Show . , . "Equus" 
Hammie . . . Frank Scherer 
Contribution to Theatre . . . Sonde 
Kuzio 

Contribution to Technical Theatre 
. . . Robert Clowes 
Contribution to Alpha Psi Omega 
. . . Sonde Kuzio and David Fry 
Entertainer of the Year . . . Robert 
Fix 

Those ore the results of the 
1989 "Alphies"! 
-Wendy Wieland 
-Page Design By Wendy 
Wieland 



David Alan Fry played a major 
role in the best student directed 
play. 

Robert Fix and Kevin Porringer 
part took in the best show of the 
year, "Equus". 



Groups & Greeks 



169 



Management 
Association 



The Management Association provides 
professional and social development for 
students who are interested in Business 
Administration through managerial skill en- 
hancement activities and social 
gatherings. 

Front Row (L to R) Lisa Vilish (Vice Presi- 
dent), Elizabeth Colleran (Secretary), 
Wendy Wieland (President), Sheri Ghin- 
dea, Lori Page Back Row Michael Po- 
pella, Doug Cadman, Paul Grancey 
(Treasurer), Don McClintock (Marketing 
Director). 




N.S.S.L.H.A. 



The National Student Speech Lan- 
guage and Hearing Association is an ac- 
tive group of sixty students NSSLHA stimu- 
lates an interest in the study of normal and 
disordered communicative behavior 
among college students 

Front Row (L to R) Jennifer Kunkle (Treasur- 
er), Barb Miller, Monica Stroniak (Presi- 
dent), Tammy Lininger (Vice President), 
Lori Giles ( Secretary) Back Row Lynn Ol- 
sen. Stephanie Stotler, Diane Sarno, Ro- 
seann Pisano 



Pershing Rifles 



Pershing Rifles is a military affiliated fra- 
ternity for men and women who are inter- 
ested in developing themselves as lead- 
ers in both military and civilian capacities 

Front Row (L to R) Brian Ebert, Denise 
Lischner, Michele Vrable, Brian Wilson 
Second Row Scott McAnallen, Chris Bau- 
man, Sandy McCord. Todd Dieffenbach, 
Sandy Madden, Tom Hughes Third Row: 
Scott Fischer, Jeff Baum, Brian Delcostello, 
Wade Casta, Adam Russell. Bill Czai- 
kowskl, George Horey, Randy Geibel. 



A ^ A 










s^ . 



Groups &, Greeks 



170 




Leadership 

Greek Conference 

In January of 1989, Clarion Uni- 
versity hod the priviledge of host- 
ing the State System of Higher 
Education(S.S.H.E.) Greek Lead- 
ership Confrence. With 375 stu- 
dents and advisors it v^/as the 
largest of the S.S.H.E. Greek Con- 
frences yet held in Pennsylvonnia. 
The keynote speaker for the 
event was Dr. Drury Bagv^/ell, 
Grand Notional President of Phi 
Sigma Kappa. Dr. Bagwell is Assis- 
tant Vice-President for Student 
Affairs at the University of Mary- 
land. He covered several as- 
spects of Greek Life, one was the 
discussion on the removal of the 
permanant "'TAP" at greek 
houses. Terry Appolonio, Presi- 
dent of the Association of Frater- 
nity Advisors, was olso a guest 
speaker. Ms. Diana Anderson, Di- 
rector of Greek Life and Special 
Services Programs at Clarion, 
presented two workshops: 
Greeks Advocating the Mature 
Management of Alcohol- 
(G.A.M.M.A.) and Chapter 
Management. 
-Paul Solosky 

-Page Design By Wendy 
Wieland 




Registration handled by Alpha 
Sigma Tau and Theta Chi. 

At the conference dinner the Al- 
pha Sigma Tau sorority is repre- 
sented well. 



Groups & Greeks 



171 



Pre-Law Club 



The Pre-Law Club aquaints members 
with career opportunities in the legal pro- 
fession through lectures, presentations, 
and on-site observations. The group is an 
active organization with a strong mem- 
bership. Members have attended the Law 
School Forum in New York City and have 
visited Cornell Low School and Harvard 
Law School. 

Front Row;(L to R) Monica Douglas, Ruth 
Bermudez (President), Jacqueline Shu- 
maker Back Row Pamela Twigg, Eirn Har- 
tle, Linwood Harris. Yong Chough 



Psychology Club 



The Psycholoy Club's goal is to promote 
awareness of psychology in everyday 
living. 

First Row (L to R) Peggy Rosfeld, Kim Brus- 
tle, Lisa Gross, Kristin Spring, Vonda Swarts, 
Michele Orf, Nancy Rieder, Tessa Bajorek. 
Second Row Amy Jo Frey, Darci Bratter, 
Missy Whitling, Cindy Vogan, Sonya Craw- 
ford, Wendy Keen, Vanessa Singleton 
Third Row Carrie Urey, Sheldon Johnson, 
Steve Porinalla, Pete Holinaro, Jody Kur- 

L ash. Laura Thomas, Stacy Bean, Heather 

I Hernon 

L 



People Understanding 
Situations of the Handi- 



P.US.H is an organization for all interest- 
ed students (handicapped or not handi- 
capped) The purpose of the group is to 
recognize and focus attention on the 
special needs of disabled individuals at 
CUP 

Front Row (L to R) Lorrie Mosier (Secre- 
tary), Roseann Pisono (President), Denise 
Wolf (Treasurer), Andrew Strohm, Back 
Row: Darlene Hartmon. Paulette Louver, 
Russell Edington, Rosie Costanza 




.11 m 
IWdliir: 





Groups & Greeks 



172 



National Award Winning Chapter 

American Marketing Association 



The Clarion University Colle- 
giate Ctiapter of the Annerican 
Marl<eting Association (AMA) is a 
national award winning chapter 
and has been highly active in 
AMA activities over the years. 

AMA offers members and stu- 
dents various speakers through- 
out the year and sponsors such 
events as CAB's, Young Entrepre- 
neurs, Career Day, and Market- 
ing Week. 

Clarion University has 350 mar- 
keting students and 125 of them 
are members of AMA. 

The executive board consists 
of 13 members: President, Vice 
President, V.P. of Finance, V.P. of 
Advertising/Promotion, V.P. of 
Communications, V.P. of Mem- 
bership, V.P. of Career Place- 



ment, V.P. of Programming, V.P. 
of Fund Raising, Co V.P. of Adver- 
tising, Newsletter Chairperson, 
Special Projects Chairperson and 
Alumni Relations. The board 
meets weekly and plans upcom- 
ing events. 

AMA competes nationally at 
The International Collegiate Con- 
ference held in New Orleans, LA, 
This year Clarion's chapter was 
judged to be number one in the 
Eastern Region, finishing ahead of 
Penn State and James Madison 
Universities. In the competition, 
the judges interview the annual 
reports of each chapter to study 
their goals and determine if the 
chapter met those goals. If prob- 
lems existed, the chapters were 
judged by how they overcame 



those problems. Overall the 
judges were looking at member- 
ship, programs, philanthropic ac- 
tivities and promotion of market- 
ing when they examined the 
chapter records. 

Dr. Timthy Wilson is the chapter 
advisor, and Dr. Joseph P. Gruen- 
wald. Dean of College of Business 
Administration at Clarion Universi- 
ty, has been named notional 
vice-president of AMA and ap- 
pointed to its national board of 
directors. 

Clarion's goal is to promote 
marketing awareness through 
membership involvement, meth- 
ods and measurement of target. 

-Carol Morianna 

-Page Design By Wendy 
Wielond 




■1989 AMA Executive Board; Sitting (L to R): Mary Ann Vanchek, V.P. of Advertising/Promotions; Cliris Golemi, Newsletter Ctiairperson. 
Laura Feldmeur, V.P, of Memberstiip; David Hrivnal<, V.P. of Communications; Yolanda Bongiovanni, V.P, of Fund Raising, Standing: 
Michelle Kaputa, CO V,P, of Advertising; Meoglnan Hrobovsl<y, V.P. of Career Placement; V.P. of Programming; Joe Stitman, Vice 
President; Debbie McAdams, President; Tina Plumb, Special Projects Ctiairperson; Carol Morianna. V.P, of Finance; Nancy Hall. Alumni 
Relations, 



Groups & Greeks 



173 



Rotaract 



Rotaract Club is a newly formed organi- 
zation at Clarion Unverslty. It is a sub-divi- 
sion of the International Rotary Club. Ttie 
goals of ttie group include practicing tiigti 
ettiical standards in business and promot- 
ing international understanding. 

Front Row:(L to R) Sue King. Leigh Kwapp, 
Susan Latherow, Robin Strauser (Presi- 
dent), Marybeth McCloskey, Connie 
Grego Back Row: Rex Fisher, David Meier, 
Chris Thompson, Phil Smokula, Ken DiMat- 
teo. Dr. Yeaney. 



Russian Club 



The Russian Club initiates lectures, films, 
art and cuisine related to Russian Society 
Open to the community, the club is also 
involved in the weekly radio broadcast on 
current Russian events, history and social 
topics. 

Front Row:(L to R) Erin Hartle, Melanie Benn 
(Secretary), Karino Blose (Vice President), 
Pamela Twigg, Rhonda Green. Back Row 
Elizabeth Bedner (Treasurer), James Sodt 
(Radio Committee Chairman), Mark 
Grant, John Bower, Felice Walker. 



^ 



Sequelle 



The Sequelle staff composes the year- 
book for Clarion University 

Front Row:(L to R) Crystal Blanding (Stu- 
dent Life Assistant Editor), Steve Cindrich 
(Current Events Section Editor), Wendy 
Wieland (Editor-in-chief), Mike Dupree 
(Senior Section Editor), Paul Solosky 
(Group Section Editor) Back Row; James 
Dentel (Layout Editor), Randy Janney- 
(Photography Editor), David Fry (Public Re- 
lations Editor), Sharon Miller (Copy Editor), 
Tim Miller (Fine Arts Editor). 








^ Groups & Greeks 



174 




A Service 

Alpha Phi Omega 

This fraternity is not like the so- 
cial fraternities where pledging is 
a major task nor of those honor- 
ary fraternities where academic 
standards are set and are re- 
quired to become a member. Al- 
pha Phi Omega is a service frater- 
nity known widely across the 
country. Any mole or female col- 
lege student, who is interested 
with a serious ottitiude toward 
service for campus and commu- 
nity projects are recommended 
for brotherhood. This chapter 
part takes in the bloodmobile 
drive, an escort service, the 
boyscout walk-a-thon, dance-a- 
thon, and special Olympics. With 
29 active members, Joseph Dom- 
broski presides and Dr. J.J. Ernis- 
see advises. 

-Wendy Wieland 

-Page Design By Wendy 
Wieland 




Back Row(R to L): Mike Baer(VP of Servi- 
ce),Holly Peters(Rec. Sec ), Jeff Long(VP 
of Pledging and Membership). Carol Roon- 
ey(VP of Social and Treasurer), Sandi 
Weaver, Front RowDenise Lischner, Sherry 
Sukits.Sheila Gashger(Custodian of Pro- 
perities),Michele Guisewite.Ken Waldron 

The navy and gold jackets of 
Alpha Phi Omega can be found 
on our campus 



Groups & Greeks 



175 



Society of Collegiate 
Journalists 



The Society of Collegiate Journalists is 
an honorary communications group. This 
group focuses on communication in both 
broadcasting and print. 

First Row:(L to R) Clarence Dupree, Fran- 
cine Liberto, Dennis Mazur. Greg Loscar. 
Second Row: Steve Cindrich, Dan 
McGreal, Pete Ferraro, Kelley Broadhurst 
(Vice President). Alaino Winters, Carol 
Vesso Third Row Bernice Bamburak, Beth 
Heidenreich (Secretory). Erin DeBocco, 
Jeffrey Nuhfer (Treasurer). Steve Engel, 
Art Barlow (Advisor), Chris Youd, 



Student Senate 



student Senate is the representative 
voice of the student body in all official 
capacities They are responsible for allo- 
cating CSA's funds, recognizing student 
organizations, and appointing students to 
represent committees. 

Front Row:(L to R) Monica Douglas. Andy 
Kalivodo. Justin Kuzemka. Emily Sweet- 
man Second Row. Lori Wisniewski, Mau- 
reen McDonough, Michelle Koputa. Wen- 
dy Oft. Phil Carbo, Erin Driscoll. Third Row 
Bob Wyor (President). Rob Taylor. Ran 
Levin. Kurt Angle. Jennifer Yaple. 



WCUB TV-5 Hot Trax Crew 



Clarion Hot Trax was the ultimate video 
machine on WCUB TV 5 Showing the lat- 
est rock music videos, rock news, album 
review, and of course the antics of the 
VJ's. Somehow. Hot Trax also managed to 
giveaway big name tickets, albums, and 
other prizes. 

First Row:(L to R) Andrea Lackemocker. 
Kellie Acquaro. Mike Dupree. Katie Mcin- 
tosh, Francine Liberto. Second Row. Tim 
Downs. Pete Ferraro. Dan McGreal Third 
Row Paul Dawley. Joe Cofforo. Derf 
Shade. Dona T. 




Groups & Greeks 



176 




WCCB 



Clarion's Hot Rock 640 

The 1989 school year was a 
time of growth and change for 
Clarion's Only Rock. Advised by 
Dr. Allan Larson, WCCB began it's 
seventeeth year of rock & roll, 
with o giant victory in the annual 
Children's Hospital fund drive. For 
a week, the staff raised over 
$1300 for the Pittsburgh Hospital! 
Next, WCCB's front room trans- 
formed into an up-to-date, state 
of the art studio. A new board 
enabled the jocks to work more 
easily and efficiently on the com- 
pact, technical system. It also en- 
hanced the quality of sound re- 
ceived in the dorms. The spring 
semester was the scene for 
WCCB's Annual "Jock Talk". On- 
air personalities shared a Satur- 
day afternoon with many inter- 
ested students, answered 
questions, swapped humorous 
stories, provided insights to the 
world of radio, gave advice to all 
budding disc jockeys, and most 
importantly, it gave a chance for 
students to make contacts for 
their future. WCCB has had a long 
standing tradition of excellence. 
Our graduates are employed all 
over the United States. WCCB 
celebrates two more graduates 
entering Pittsburgh radio, seniors 
Kristopher Abrams and Dave Neff 
take the WCCB pride and tradi- 
tion with them to 100.7 FM WMXP 
and 104. 7FM WYDD, respectively. 
We are a college legend. We are 
WCCB, Hot Rock 640. 

-Roberta Mascari 

-Page Design by Wendy Wie- 
land 



WCCB disc jockeys work with the bulky, 
old system before the new look. 

WCCB energetic staft:Front:Roberta Mas- 
cari. Second Row:(L to R) Trevor Johnson. 
Bob Haywood, Rich McCall, Teresa, Amy 
Anderson, Mary Retort, Beth Rake, Brian 
Bennet, Michele Tucci. Marina DiMcrtino- 
(Sales Director). Francine Libertc /mBws Di- 
rector). Third RowJay Warhola. Shellie 
Beers, Marceilo Hamelton, Pat Buzzard. 
Lori Anderson, Rob Hemming(General 
Manager). Joy Winters, Kothis Tepper. 
Bernice Bomburak. Back Row:Greg Ozi- 
mek. D.R. Reid. Dr. Larson, Bill Woddell, Kris 
Abrams(Program Director), Dave Neff- 
(Music Director), Bill Clough. Joe Rubin- 
stein. 





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Running back Ken Dworek strikes a quick pose with 
Clarion mascot, "Twink", during a time out. 

Clarion students find time to excercise and keep fit. 
The university provides facilities for tennis, raquetball, 
wrestling, basketball, aerobics, and numerous ottiers to 
meet tfie individual interests of the students. 




KINESCOPE 

Bodies In Motion 

The 1988-89 season was full of action and surprises. The variety of sports were 
supported by the student body as well as the surrounding community. This year in 
sports has seen many changes, numerous Improvements In training methods, new 
coaching styles, a tragic lost of a faithful friend, several all american standings and 
a few disappointing seasons. Seasons cannot be categorized Into terms of good or 
bad. They ore simply the reflections of team efforts. In our eyes. Clarion atheletes 
had an outstanding season. 

-Section Editor Gary Horner 

-Section Design by James Dentel 








The new and improved 1988-89 Cheerleading 
Squad does a mount invloving the whole gong. 

A cheering duo takes time out to greet the 
cameras^ 




Lisa Kulick leads the crowd as the sun warms the 
stadium on a brilliant fall day. 

The Clarion Eagle is the center of attention, his 
make-over still new to many of the fans. 



Sports 



180 



Cheerleading 

Keeping The Spirits Hi.,. 



"I became very excited when I took over the role as the 
mascot. The position proved to be a challenge, yet very 
enjoyable," 




The cheerleading squad showing what they do best. 



The Clarion Univeristy cheerleading 
squad is comprised of dedicated and 
talented student athletes. The squad 
trains all year to keep physically fit for 
rigorous practice, sporting events, and 
competitions. One might think that 
cheerleading isn't a sport, and if it is, it's 
a "wimp's sport"; but today's cheer- 
leading is based on aerobic fitness, to- 
tal strength fitness to perform lifts and 
tosses, and gymnastic abilities. 

The graduate cheerleading coach is 
that "all knowing", friendly guy, John 
Brown. John was an undergraduate at 
Penn State University where he was on 
the cheerleading squad for two-and- 
a-half years. As a member of the Penn 
State squad he traveled twice to San 
Diego, California for the Universal 
Cheerleading Associatin National 
Championships. He came to Clarion 
with the hopes of building a collegiate 
competition squad, and by doing that, 
promote cheerleading as a true sport. 

The cheerleading squad is present 
for all football, wresting, and basket- 
ball games occuring at Clarion Univer- 
sity. The cheerleading squad does 
more than just train during the season, 
they also attend summer camps as 
well as work for summer camps. 

Members of the squad after Fall try- 
outs include: Vickie Bough Shelly 
Deeter, Sandra Dimenno, Liza Dou- 
gherty, Sherry Kalso, Lisa Kulick, Stacy 
Nicolette, Angela Schrantz, Stephanie 
Sherman, Michelle Thompson, Sherry 
Wagner, Stacy Wig, Kim Wyland, Brian 
Arth, Wayne Kaspick, Rich Kusten- 
bauder, Don Horning, and Stuart Little. 
Head Coach: John Brown and Asst. 
Coach Melissa Sadowski. 

This season's mascots included two 
very witty people, Sean "Twink" Tay- 
lor and Jim "Pike" Pike. Twink graduat- 
ed after the fall semester, leaving Pike 
to finish the year by leading the fans at 
home sporting events. 

-Wayne C .sospick 
-Page Design By 
Wendy Sue Wieland 



Sports 



181 



A Clarion Gridder grimaces as his opponent fin- 
ishes an attack after the play has ended, 

A player takes off for a down and out pass 

Quarterback Tim Meyers makes a strategic 
hand off to his teammate even surprising the 
fans on the sidelines. 




.7 









~rt>*Mjly^'ilj 



T.iN»" 



Sports 



182 



AN OUTBREAK OF OPTIMISM 



"Although our season was 
a disappointment, the expe- 
rience gained by our youth 
will make the 1989 season 
the start of a brand new tra- 
dition." -Coach Sobolewski 





Clarion's offense attempts to move down the field to moke a big touchdown. 



Despite losses due to graduation 
and injuries, the Clarion gridders man- 
aged to finish the season on a strong 
note and gain valuable experience for 
next season. By winning two of their 
last three games, the team built a 
strong foundation for the 1989 season. 

Clarion's offense finished 1988 with 
the 4th best total offense in the West- 
ern Division. The offense was led by 
quarterback Mike Carter, who despite 
being injured, managed to complete 
61 out of 138 passes for 753 yards and 
4 touchdowns. The top receiver for 
1988 was 2nd team all-conference 
Ron Urbansky who caught 35 passes 
for 491 yards and 3 touchdowns. Tri- 
captain Jerry Starr, a tight end hauled 
in 21 catches and 2 touchdowns. 

The winning game was led by tail- 
backs Sean Morrissey, Ken Dworek and 
fullback Keith Powell. Morrissey, the 9th 
place career rusher gained 577 yards 
and 4 touchdowns. He also set a new 
Clarion record for longest touchdown 
run, an 81 yarder against Lock Haven. 
Dworek meanwhile scored 3 times 
while Powell scored 4 touchdowns. The 
offensive line was anchored by A. P. All- 
American second team Larry Wiesen- 
bach and tri captain Pat Prenatt. 

Defensively, the squad lived through 
a nightmare of injuries. The defense 
was led by 2nd All-Americon John Pe- 
terman at safety with an incredible 
136 tackles, three fumble recoveries 
and 1 sack. The secondary hod an 
outstanding year and along with Pe- 
terman, Jacque DeMatteo was 2nd on 
the team. 

Upfront Mark Williams led the Eagles 
with 4 sacks and contributed 86 tack- 
les, while the line backers were led by 
Don Taylor, tri captain, and Doug 
Caruso. 

"Considering the improvement we 
made, I'd say we're cautiously optimis- 
tic for the 1989 season," reflected So- 
bolewski. "We believe we have the 
young talent and experience to get 
off to a better start in 1989. 
-Ray Bortoli 
-Page Design By Staff 



Sports 



183 



A Challenging Season 



The Clarion University Cross Country 
Team head coach Bill English stated 
that, "Overall, we have a relatively 
young team, yet the great attitudes 
of our runners v^ill result in a tougher 
team." 

The Cross Country Team here at 
Clarion is very young, and despite inju- 
ries, they finished v^ith a .500 record at 
2 wins and 2 losses. Before the injuries 
occured, coach English had forecast- 
ed an undefeated season. "With all of 
the fine efforts by this youthful team, 
we are looking at next season with 
high expectations." 

Senior Ed Kinch went down after the 
first meet and has applied for a medi- 
cal hardship. If approved, the team will 
have a solid nucleus for next season 
along with the maturity of this year's 
freshmen. English concluded, "I would 
like to consider this year the beginning 
of real quality years." 

The development of this year's 
women's squad will also form the build- 
ing blocks for upcoming years. The top 
three consist of senior Kristen Swick, 
Roseanne McCabe, and sophomore 
Julie Parry. "We have a solid one, tow, 
three," English said, "and we have po- 
tential to pull together to be a viable 
team." With solid performances from 
the youth, next year's squad will be 
stronger and more mature. This will 
hopefully begin a successful run of solid 
cross country teams here at Clarion. 
-Ray Bortolli 
-Page Design By Wendy Wieland 



"I would like to consider this year the beginning of real quality 
years." -Coach Bill English 




The 1988 Men's Cross Country Team (L to R)Kneeling:DaveHartman, Chris Fenn, Aaron Holecy, 
Steve Sparono, Joe r?ubinsteln and Pat Janovick. Standing Ed Kinch, Rusty Flynn, Steve Wil- 
liams. Keith Rice. Ken Bauman. Mark Stallsmith and Rich Zajac, 



Sports 



184 




The Women's Cross Country Team:(L to R)Kneeling:Rose McCobe, Kristen Swick, Julie Parry, and Mary Callan- 
der.Standing Jo Buck, Rutti Bermudez, Vanessa Singleton, Amy Gibbons, and Trina Hess. 



Sports* 



185 



OFF TO NATIONALS 



work pays off, 



Clarion University's Women's Tennis 
team, under thie direction of seventti 
year head coach Norbert Baschnagel, 
won an unprecedented third straight 
PSAC title in the 1988-1989 season. The 
Golden Eagles were also honored 
when head coach Norb Baschnagel 
was named "Coach of the Year". 

"We just played super, gutsy tennis 
the whole weekend," stated a very 
pleased Baschnagel after the team 
won it's fourth tournament. "Of the 
three that we've won, this was cer- 
tainly the toughest by far and the most 
rewarding,", he continued, "The level 
of play was very high, but our team 
held together and rose to the occa- 
sion time and time again. I couldn't be 
happier with our performance." 
-Nancy Richert 
-Page Design By Wendy Wieland 



"We had an outstanding 
fall season, in which we were 
12-0 in our dual meet record 
and brought our third straight 
PSAC Women's Tennis 
Championship home. No oth- 
er team in the conference 
has done this. This spring 
we're 2-1 and looking for- 
ward to our return trip to 
nationals." 
-Norb Baschnagel 





The 1988-89 Clarion University Women's Tennis Team: Kneeling (L to R); Amanda Bell. Lora 
Kohn, Debra McAdams, Jane Bender. Lori Berk and Jennifer Baron, Standing (L to R): Amy 
Under, Student Coach Susan Fritz, Elizabeth Chaney, Natalie Neelon. Lisa Warren, Carolyn 
Vollecorsa, Roseonn Kromarski, Tammy Myers and Head Coach Norb Baschnagel. 



^ Sports 

186 ^ 





!', 9 




Russell Dexter of G.TE^ presents Jane Bender 
wltti her GTE/COSIDA Academic All-Americon 
Award. 

Amanda Bell reaches high in perfect form as she 
serves up an ace. 

Spectators gather at the fences to watch Clari- 
on battle against the rivalry of lUP. 



ff>t-*i t m " m imm 



i> ^ .,^ 4.^ V' .^ '-^ "* 



Sports 



187 



Jodi Pezek awaits a set up from Sue Holcombe. 
Carrie Hawley serves up another point for Clari- 




Jennifer Sims ctieers on her teammates as she 
takes a break from the game. 




Sports 



^88 



THE 1989 STATE VOLLEYBALL CHAMPS 



iy Eagles bring home the first P: 



r in Clarion's history. 




"We had a superb season. 
Our first PSAC channpionship 
had a great recruiting year. 
We look forward to next 
year with guarded 
optimism. We have eight 
returning players despite 
the loss of three seniors. 
We have a state title to 
defend which will make us 
more competitive." -Cindy 
Opalski 



1988 Clarion University Women's Volleyball Team: Row 1 (L to R): Sue Holcombe, Jennifer Sims. 
Melissa O'Rourke. Kelli Blosel. Lisa Brandon. Linda Cunningtiam. Row 2 (L to R): Assistant Coach 
Ellen Orner, Jodi Pezek. Carrie Walker. Monica Mitchell, Carrie Hawley. Denise Loyton. Tammy 
Wolfe. Coach Cindy Opalski, 




The Clarion University Women's Vol- 
leyball team, led by head coach Cindy 
Opalski, ended the best season in the 
school's history by bringing home the 

1988 State Championship, 

The team began a sluggish season, 
losing three out ot their first four match- 
es. By mid-season, however, the team 
was beginning to jell. The wins were 
out numbering the losses as the season 
progressed and by the end of the 
scheduled matches. Clarion went to 
the PSAC-West Division Championships 
with a record of 18-12, Clarion had 
peaked and after placing second in 
that tournament, earned themselves a 
ticket to the PSAC Championships in 
Edinboro. There, Clarion made history 
by beating Shippensburg in three 
straight games and giving up only one 
game to Edinboro to take the title. 

Leading the team this year were 
Clarion seniors Melissa O'Rourke, 
Tammy Wolfe, and Carrie Hawley. 
Missy, a setter and the captain of the 

1989 team, was a reliable and consis- 
tant player. "I've been very pleased 
with Missy,", Opalski praised, "she's 
taking more of a leadership role and 
takes control of close gomes." Also 
setting a star example was outside hit- 
ter. Tammy Wolfe. "She has the expe- 
rience behind her and she's really filled 
the outside hitter position well.,, and 
Carrie is so dependable; her defense 
has improved tremendously. Her bock 
row play has been solid,", Opalski add- 
ed. The success of these seniors de- 
pended upon the strength of their sup- 
portive team. A handful of 
sophomores and a trio of freshmen al- 
lowed Opalski to run a flexible offense 
that was missing in last year's strategy. 

After this fantastic season, the team 
realizes that they will be a tough act to 
follow. "We lose some quality veteran 
players, but we feel we hove on ex- 
cellent nucleus returning for 1989," re- 
flected Opalski, "We're already excit- 
ed about getting started for next 
year." 

-Sharon Miller 

-Page Design By Wendy Wielond 



Sports 



189 



NCAA Division I Wrestling 



For Coach Robert "Bob" Bubb's 23rd 
season. Clarion University's 29 man Di- 
vision I Wrestling team came away 
with a winning season. The team's re- 
cord of 9 and 8 record is a great leap 
from last year's "reloading year." Clar- 
ion earned its record by defeating 
teams such as University of Pitt-Johns- 
town, Maryland, William and Mary, 
West Virginia Univ., Cleveland State, 
Ashland, and Nebraska. 

Some of top performers for Clarion 
were senior co-captain Mike Cole at 
142 with a 48-4 record and senior co- 
captain Gary Horner at 190 pounds 
with a 24-7 season record. Along with 
them were sophomore Corey Jones at 
1 18 pounds with a 23-1 1-3 record and 
sophomore Joe Rozanc, who is filling in 
for Kurt Angle, at the heavyweight lev- 
el with a 18-4 season record. 

Clarion hosted the 1989 NCAA Divi- 
sion I Eastern Wrestling League Cham- 
pionship at Tippin Gymnasium. With a 
crowd from all over the east coast. 
Clarion qualified its top four wrestlers 
for nationals and had eight place win- 
ners and an immediate runner-up. 
Overall Penn State won its eighth 
straight EWL title but Clarion came in 
6th. Coach Bubb commented, "We 
needed to get a spark going in the 
early rounds and just didn't get that 
spark until late. Seeing that spark, 
even in toward the end, was still end- 
ing the tournament positively." Clarion 
moved to national championships in 
Oklahoma City, where they took a 
strong 19th place. Cole took 3rd at 
and Horner 6th at with both achieving 
All-American status. 

On a side note for Kurt Angle who 
redshirted this year to wrestle for the 
USA team, finished in 2nd place in the 
Eastern European Tournament in Istan- 
bul, Turkey. Kurt comments he's 
learned a lot from his international ex- 
periences and is inspired toward his 
goal of the 1992 Olympics in Spain. 
-Michael Dupree 
-Page Design By 
Wendy Wieland 



"We had a good year. We were close 
in every match. Despite our young 
team, our 3 seniors provided leader- 
ship and direction. Although we'll be 
sorry to see our 3 seniors go, we're 
excited about watching the young 
team of next year develop." - Coach 
Bob Bubb 





1988-89 Clarion University Wrestling Team: Kneeling (left to right) Jomes Reider. Dennis DiPie- 
tro, Dean Breudigam, Mike Richner, Erik Burnett, John Cavlovic, James Morette. Corey Jones. 
"Kip" Winget, Luke Shocklee. Row 2: Scott Henry, Mike Yuisko. Brian Burk, Dylan Lawlor, Mike 
Cole, Greg Johns, Chris Snare, Jeff Rosenberg, Gary Munch, John Pasta, and Troy Caslow, 
Row 3 Dave Burandt. Steve Penhollow. Justin Kuzemka, Gary Horner, Gerry Armengau. Kurt 
Angle, Justin Watters, and Mike Bundy 



Sports 



190 




Mike Cole goes for a pin at regionals in Philadel- 
phia. 




Mike Cole placed third at the NCAA Division. 
Wrestling National Championships in Oklahoma 
City, Oklahoma, Gary Horner placed sixth. 

Brian Burk collected near fall points in a match 
with a West Virginia opponent. 



Sports 



191 



On The Rise 



oa!i Team Makes A Comeback 



This year's Golden Eagles wrapped 
up a fantastic season with a 14-12 re- 
cord. It was the teams first winning 
season since the 1984-85 year. 

First year head coach Ron Righter 
from use, walked into the year without 
the benefit of a recruiting season yet, 
he ended with a winning record, de- 
feating three nationally ranked Division 
II teams plus an NCAA Division I team. 
Coach Righter also helped to stir en- 
thusiasm and excitement right from 
the start when he held the first prac- 
tice at twelve midnight, the first legal 
practice day, which is known now as 
Midnight Madness. 

Junior Ted Boyer was a key player 
this year and was named second 
team PSAC West Conference Player. 
Boyer led the team with 15.5 points per 
game and 6.8 rebounds per game. 
Tony Defillip, a junior college transfer, 
was one of the brightest newcomers. 
He ended the season with on average 
of 11.3 points per game from the point 
guard position. Seniors Steve Cox, Tom 
Lapertosa and Dave Johnson finished 
out a great collegiate career, averag- 
ing close to 10 points per game. 

Both the basketball team and 
Coach Righter can be very proud of 
their accomplishments this year. "We 
got the maximum out of each and ev- 
ery player and that's what produced a 
winning season," Righter said. "I was 
very pleased with our overall effort, es- 
pecially the commitment the players 
made to want to get the job done. I 
think we exceeded everyones expec- 
tations. With a winning season, and big 
wins over established teams, we're 
hoping to use this season as a building 
block for bigger and better things to 
come," claimed Righter. That says it all 

-Nancy Richert 

-Page Design by James Dentel 



"We had a suprisingly good 
year. The kids believed in the 
system and believed in them- 
selves. They played with a great 
deal of cofindence. I may look 
down the road a few years from 
now and remember this team as 
the one I am most proud of." - 
Men's Basketball Head Coach, 
Ron Righter 





Clarion University Men's Basketball Team;Kneeling(L to R):Head Coacti Ron Righter, Joe Hen- 
derson, Loroy Dillard, Harold Wood, Tony DeFillip, Dove Fragale. Row 2:Craig List, Ed Hepinger, 
Paul Bamberger, Tim Williams, Dave Jotinson, Ted Boyer, Assistant Coacti Bernie Prevuznak. 
Back rowAssistant Coacti Dave Fitzgerald, Steve Cox, Tom Lapertosa, Ctiris Davis, Valentine 
Igvi/e, Assistant Coach Die Doumanian, 



Sports 



192 



Steve Cox slams in two points against ttie Raid- 




Ted Boyer leaps tiigh for a successful lay up. 

All eyes ore on Dave Fitzgerald as tie attempts o 
jump stiot. 



Sports 



193 



A Year In Sports... 



John Smith 1988 USA Olympic 
Wrestling Gold Medalist is 
welcomed at CUP. 

That Is really using your head. 
Pike. 

This track member strives for 
his qualifying PSAC goal. 



Page Design by Wendy Wie 
land 




'Tm 



Steve Cox completes another slam dunk. 
Taking a break on the bench after a rough quarter. 
The young Softball team creates a loud spirit raiser! 









What a spike! 



Sports 



195 



An Up And Down Season 



The women's basketball team, 
headed by Coach Leah Magestro and 
assisted by Sandy Dowdy, experi- 
enced an up and down season this 
year. 

On the up side, senior co-captains 
Kim Beanner and Cheryl Bansek, both 
ended their collegiate careers scoring 
over 1,000 points. They were the sec- 
ond and third temale hoop players to 
accomplish this. They are now in the 
number one and two positions on the 
CUP scoring list, Beanner with 1,054 
and Bansek with 1,049. 

Luck wasn't on the teams side how- 
ever, as the team was beset with a 
plaque of injuries and illnesses, Mages- 
tro was forced to constantly change 
the starting line-up and substitute from 
a depleted bench, "Each contest was 
a new challenge from a different 
team, a different group of people" 
said Magestro, 

This year's normal starting line-up 
consisted of Kim Beanner, Cheryl Ban- 
sek, Bonnie Sasse, Lisa Bahorik and 
Jeannine Tyler. Sasse, a sophomore, 
was third in scoring with 10. 1 points per 
game, 38 assists and was second in 
boards 8.1 rebounds per game, 44 
swipes and she lead the team with a 
50% shooting accuracy. Bahorik aver- 
aged 7.0 points per game. She had a 
season high of 17 points in an overtime 
game win against Slippery Rock. Fresh- 
man Jeannine Tyler ended her first 
year with an average of 7.8 points per 
game, 4.9 rebounds per game, 63 as- 
sists and 23 steals. Fifteen points and 
10 boards were her season highs. 

Also contributing to the hardworking 
women's basketball team was sopho- 
more Leslie Woods, and freshmen 
Kathy Butzler, Hilal Edebal, Stephanie 
Dimoff. Kelly Burke, Paula Judy and 
Chrissy Gnibus. 
-Nancy Richert 
-Page Design By Wendy Wieland 



When commenting on The 
Golden Eagle Classic here at 
Clarion, Coach Magestro re- 
plied, "I think we're playing too 
carefully. We have to drive to 
the basket more, however, all 
was not lost as Cheryl Bansek 
was nominated to the all tour- 
nament team." 





Clarion University Women's Basketball Team Row 1(L to R):Manager Marie Wiegand. Jeannine 
Tyler, Steptianie Dimoff, Kathy Butzler, Kim Beanner, Kelly Burke, Paula Judy. Leslie Woods, and 
Kathy Stahlnecker, Row 2: Head Coach Leah Magestro, Beth Russell, Chrissy Gnibus, Cheryl 
Bansek, Hilal Edebal, Jackie Johns, Lisa Bahorik, and Assistant Coach Sandy Dowdy. 



Sports 



196 






Lady Eagles defend that home 
basket against Pitt-Johnstown. 

Elizabeth Russell gets the ball 
advantage. 



Sports 



^97 



sp 



Men's Swimming And Diving 



:cessfu! Season 



The Clarion University Men's Swim- 
ming team led by 11th year head 
coach Bill Miller, ended their 1988-89 
season on a high note by winning their 
19th straight PSAC Crown and by tak- 
ing 5th place honors at the NCAA Divi- 
sion II Nationals. 

"It was a true team performance, ", 
commented Miller, "Our swimmers had 
some gutsy performances," Miller has 
compiled an impressive 83-13 dual 
meet record in ten seasons while lead- 
ing Clarion to equally impressive Divi- 
sion II National finish. 

The Golden Eagles were led in the 
pool by Senior, co-captains Damon 
Pietronigro, and Keith Fritz. Pietronigro, 
was a four-time All-America at Nation- 
als. Other top performers that led Clar- 
ion included Fritz, Davis, Cunningham, 
Souer, Cook, Songster, and Bowers. 
The Golden Eagles have been 5th or 
better in all but one Nationals since 
1981. 

The Men's Diving Team took a total 
of 8 All-American placings on both div- 
ing board competitions at NCAA Divi- 
sion II and National Championship 
competition, Markus HeveIke, a sopho- 
more, who won both the 1 and 3 me- 
ter springboard titles, and also earned 
the title, "Diver of the Year", In addi- 
tion to Hevelke's performances, senior 
Tim Etter was 2nd on the 3 meter and 
10th on the 1 meter, while sophomore 
Rob Walder was 9th on the 3 meter 
and 6th on the 1 meter. 

Leas has now coached 36 National 
Champion divers at Clarion and has 
had his divers earn 227 All-American 
placings. Leas, who finishes his 23rd 
year as Clarion's Diving Coach, was 
named NCAA Division II "Coach of the 
Year" for his outstanding work with the 
teams. 

-Staff Writer 
-Page Design By 
Michael Dupree 



"I was pleased with the progress of the divers 
OS a group. I was especially pleased with 
Markus Hevell<e He worked hard to over- 
come his hurt shoulder, I was also pleased 
with Lisa Jonson's performance. She earned 
4th and 6th at Nationals," -Coach of the 
Year, Coach Leas 




GHM 1 HERSK 


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:r ihersh 


3 or 69 


NICRO SIUER 
IDIKIS 


6 48,12 


^ 





„NOIITHRIOCE e K 99 CLIEION 




Men's Swimming and Diving TeamBottom Row(L to R):James Bowers, Keith Fritz, Damon 
Pietronigro, Keith Makeyenko Row 2 Jacquez Gaines, Eric Muntan, Greg Cunningham. Chris 
Glenn, Skip Miller, Curt Burich, Row 3 Robert Walker, John Troube, Scott Zacharda, Heath 
Cook, Rick Songster, Tim Winchell. Jason Miller, Row 4 Tim Etter, Charles Watkins, Craig Mor- 
bey. Mitch Horton, Ed Sauer, Ross Davis, Mike Bingaman, and Duone Suter. 



Sports 



198 




Coach Miller looks on as the judges compute the 
swimming scores. 



Sports 




What's a little water between friends. 
Co-captains Trish Barber and Sandra Crouse 



A Wet-n-Wild meet held here at Tippin Gymnasi 
um. 



Sports 



200 



Women's Swimming and Diving 



Jke Fish in The 



^. 



"The season went well. I was pleased with the 
progress of the divers as a group. I was also 
pleased with the performance of the swim team 
at the PSAC championship and National cham- 
pionship." -Diving Coach Leas 





Women's Swimming and Diving TeamBottom Row(L to R);Lisa Johnson, Michelle Brennan, 
Sandra Crouse, Thrish Barber, Helen Sol<ol, Bonnie Belfiore. Row 2:Heather Thompson. Karen 
Winsock, Cheryl Baker, Jennifer Quel, Kristi Rosenbaum, Shari Harshman, Dina Maylor, Lisa 
Raymond, Jennifer Panza. Row 4:Sharon Kinkel, Nancy Conroy, Deena Muscato, Christine 
Jensen, Katie Macintosh, Robin Tucker, Tina Pecce. 



Sports 



The Women's Swimming Team had 
another outstanding season this year. 
They captured their 14th straight PSAC 
championship which led them toward 
7th place finish at the NCAA Division II 
National championship. In the pool. 
Clarion was paced by Trish Barber, 
Christine Jensen, Heather Mekos, San- 
dra Crouse, Kristi Rosenbaum, Shari 
Harshman, Paula Gray, and Robin 
Tucker. All were standout performers 
at the PSAC and National 
championships. 

The Women's Diving team under 
Coach Leas continued their winning 
ways in the 1989-88 year by bringing 
home consecutive championship and 
placing at the NCAA Division II Nation- 
als. Also having a very successful sea- 
son, the diving team brought home 
their 14th straight PSAC Championship 
and placing 7th at the NCAA Division II 
Nationals. Golden Eagles Divers at this 
years at Nationals were Lisa Johnson, o 
sophorrtore, and Katie Macintosh, a 
former three time All-American. John- 
son was able to improve her national 
record from last year by placing fourth 
on the 1 meter and 6th on the 3 meter. 
She has now earned 4-time AA career 
honors. 

Leas was quoted at the start of the 
season that, "If we dedicate ourselves 
with hard work and determination this 
year, we will get the rewards at the 
end of the season." Congratulations 
Coach Leas and the CUP Swimming 
and Diving Teams. You did it. 

-Kelly Radoweicz 
-Page Design By 
Michael Dupree 



201 



Seeking Personal Bests 



Coaching the Men's Track Team for 
17 seasons and the Women's Track 
Team for 12 seasons. Bill English ex- 
pected a big step forward in the 1988- 
89 season. March 18th opened the 
Track end Field team season at the 
Clarion All-Comers meet held at Me- 
morial Stadium. Women's Track Team 
outlook for the outdoor season was 
promising with three broken records in 
the final indoor competition. Jo Buck, a 
junior of Somerset, PA, took the tope 
to 35-1 at Penn State for a new indoor 
team record while placing second in 
the overall competition. Kathy Seman, 
a sophmore of Monroeville, PA, placed 
top of her form as she clocked in at 63 
seconds in the 400 meter dash and 
placed thrid overall at Penn State. Tina 
Smith, a freshman coming from Law- 
renceville, NJ, lifted both the indoor 
and overall high jump record for CUP 
to 5-4. Tina has turned in times that 
compare with the top of the field in 
state competition. English comments 
"We're not concerned with the team 
scoring this year because we know we 
can't compete with the larger teams, 
perhaps in the future when we can get 
our numbers up we will be competitive 
as a team, but for now it is the individ- 
ual performances that we are con- 
cerned with." PSAC Championship 
were held May 11-13 at Seth Grove 
Stadium at Shippensburg University. 
Placing fifth at 10,000 meters, Julie Par- 
ry timed at 38:47.5. Jo Buck placed 
fifth at the triple jump with the dis- 
tance of 36-9, and the overall team 
placed 12th. 

The Men's team took a new direc- 
tion this season with stressing on sprint- 
ers rather than distance runners. Sprint- 
ers include Jon Weatherby, 
sophomore of New Castle, PA, Rick 
Panzar, a freshman of Leeper, PA, and 
Melvin Morris, a freshman of Wilkins- 
burg, PA The Golden Eagles also hold 
down a strong distance and standout 
field groups. When the season came 
to an close at the PSAC, the male Ea- 
gles tied with three other teams for last 
place. 

-Wendy Wieland 

-Page Design By Wendy Wieland 



"Our Numbers are up and we have added quality young 
athletes to a relatively young exsisting team which will help us 
grow together." Men and Women's Track and Field Coach - 
Bill English 






#4 



-% "<i"- 







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OAJiL 





f}fmi 



1989 Clarion University Men's Track: Front l?ow(L to R);John Rubinstein, Ricl< BIyley, Rusty Flynn, 
Steve Williams. Phillip Mazzo, Pat Jonovich, Chris Fenn. Row 2: Ed Hendricks, Rick Panzar, Rob 
Covi^ell, Chad Lane, David Hennon, Doug Cadman. Tim Eirich, Jon Weatherby, Ed Kinch, Aaron 
Daugherty. Keith Rice. 



Sports 



202 




^Qd£hfi^ 



1989 Clarion University Wonnen's Track & Field Roster (alphabetically): Jennifer Abbott, Dana Best, Jo Buck, Mary 
Callandar. Heather Ellis, Jennifer Ewing, Amy Gibbons, Trina Hess, Kim Hummel, Michelle Jasper, Melinda Killen, Rose 
McCabe, Julie Parry, Katie Roussey, Kathy Seman, Jennifer Sims, Tina Smith, Helen Sokol, Kristen Swick, Laura Willis, and 
Head Coach Bill English. 



Sports 



203 




Waiting for the perfect pitch is what its all it about. 



Out Of The Park 

Th8 Eagles Are Rounding The Bases 



The element which the team lacks is 

experience. As head coach Rich Herman says, "If you haven't 

been to the dance, you don't know how to act." 







fV^ f^' mf/ I^V {. 






ill - ^;S^ >^v "jr^'l 




1989 Clarion University Basebali Team: Front row (left to right): Matt Michaols, Dorrell Fuikmon, 
Scott Rhoades, Mike Dominelli, Todd Vanderburgh, Larry Roberts. Tom Snee, Curt Ditzen- 
berger. Row 2: Chuck Greggs, Craig Stewart, Bill Beith, Troy Hazeltine, John Moreau, Ron 
Thellman, Scott Frano, and Brian Hamilton. Row 3: Mike Willings. Gary Lowry, Kevin Watts. Brett 
Houy, Lee Wever. Todd Jordan, A.J. Meeker, and A.J. Lutz, Row 4: John Walsh, Jim Whitiinger. 
Gary Jones, Dave Murphy, Don Colucci, Bryan Carfley, John Livermore, and coach Rich 
Herman. 



Sports 



First Year Head Coach Rich Herman 
took his 33 man squad to Cocoa Expo, 
Florida for an eight game southern 
swing during spring break to kick off 
their 1989 season. Coach Herman feels 
this is a much needed facet of the 
program. "Our first priority on the trip 
will be to get all of our players game 
ready." The trip to Florida is a definite 
plus in preparing for the battles in the 
PSAC West. 

Coach Herman has a team which is 
dominated by underclassmen. "I know 
we have a young team, but I believe 
the talent is enough to challenge our 
opponents." Herman is counting on his 
solid front line, which includes Brian 
Carfley and Todd Vanderburgh at the 
corners, Dave Murphy at shortstop, 
and either Tom Snee or Ron Thellman 
at second, to provide support and 
leadership throughout the year. 

The Golden Eagles biggest asset is 
their hitting, but if they want to stay in 
contention, a heavy burden falls upon 
the Clarion hurlers and good team de- 
fense to back them up. Clarion pitch- 
ers are looking to improve on a lofty 
combined ERA in which they gave up 
more than 7 runs per boll game last 
season. Anchoring this young staff will 
be senior Brian Hamilton and sopho- 
more A.J. Lutz. 

This team does lack depth and ex- 
perience, but the eagerness of this 
young bunch will definitely create 
some troubled times for the opposition. 

The combination of Rich Herman as 
head baseball coach and the young 
dosage of talent maybe just what the 
doctor ordered for the Clarion Universi- 
ty Baseball Program for the future. 
However, the Eagles inexperience hurt 
them badly as their 9-25 record shows, 
but what is not shown is the drastic turn 
around from last years Eagles. Clarion 
is no longer an easy win in PSAC West 
and in the future will build upon this 
season. 

-James Dentel 
-Page Design By Staff 



205 



Determined Pitching 



» ** 










Line drive for a single. 
A call for the ump 




ii 



Sports 



206 



A Killer Lineup 



A Ybi 



n Makes A 



As Coach Harding commented "for us to play as tough as we did with our 
freshmen and sophomores is impressive in itseif." 











, ^i-'^f^JQl^' 



As Coach Harding moves into her 
second season of softball, she shows a 
very promising Lady Eagle team. This 
young team, made mostly of freshmen 
and sophomores, showed incredible 
possibilities as they put up a battle in 
the PSAC West. However, the Eagles 
Softball team showed its inexperience 
on the field as they went to a 4 and 16 
season. Though they had great poten- 
tial, the team often seemed to lose 
their games in the lost innings after 
having a great start. Usually begining 
with a great start and showing excel- 
lent defense the team has problems 
holding on to the lead and many times 
lost by only a run. But as Coach Har- 
ding points out, this is only the second 
season of recruiting. This season should 
prove excellent background for next 
season and was a definite impove- 
ment over lost season. This year can 
be described as a building season and 
what a skyscraper it is building. 

This year was not anywhere near a 
total loss though as two Clarion Eagle 
players were seclected to the PSAC- 
West first team in women's softball. 
The two players chosen were Clarion's 
second baseman Troci Nickleach and 
first baseman/pitcher Carol Grubb. 
With these two in Clarion's lineup 
PSAC-West is begining to realize that 
the inexperience of Clarion is turning to 
experience and a definte powerhouse 
that will be feared. 

-Michael Dupree 
-Page Design By 
Wendy Wieland 



1989 Clarion University Softbail Team includes (left to right): Front row; Jennifer Beiser, Micheie 
Campbell, Kim Goydos, Lori Phillips, Carol Grubbs, Carta Wegmer, Collen Logue and Bonnie 
Sasse. Back row: Head Coach Mary Harding, Traci Nickleach, Jane Hogue, Heather Drake, 
Amy Davis, Susan Morgan, Kathy Stahlnecker, Laurie Neidig, Maureen Vinkler, and Asst. Coach 
Allen Tomasello. 



Sports 



207 



still Swinging 



The 1988-89 season suffered a major 
disappointmenf with the death of Golf 
Coach Hal R. Hansen February 25, 
1989. As a result the team has been 
taken over by Acting Coach, Bob 
Carlson. The young and inexperienced 
CUP golf team competed in many 
prestigous events this year. The golf 
team participated in the William and 
Mary Invitational, the Wooster Classic, 
the Slippery Rock Invitational, the 
Pennsylvania State Invitational, the In- 
diana University of Pennsylvania Invita- 
tional, the Allegheny Invitational, and 
the PSAC Championship Tournaments. 
-Bob Carlson 
-Page Design By 
Wendy Wieland 



We had a trying but exciting season. 
-Bob Carlson 




1 










? Golf Team: Front row (left to right) Alan Harper, Mark Kiser, Andy 
Kockler, Dan Rice. Bock row: John Misitis, Jack Masich, Bob Carlson, Acting 
Coach. Not Present: Mark Huffman, EJ Seergae, and Richard Grafton, 



Sports 



i^ 



208 



In Memory of... 



...Coach Hansen 



On February 25, 1989 
Clarion University iost one 
of tine great coaches to 
have graced our school, 
53 year old Coach Hal R. 
Hansen. Into his third year 
as Head Coach of 
Clarion's golf team. Coach 
Hansen has brought Clarion 
to a 1987 runner-up in the 
PSAC Golf Tournament 
with Greg Spinetti winning 
an All-American title. 

Coach Hansen is 
survived by wife, Marilyn, 
and his six children. After 
graduating from Mansfield 
State College, he 
coached for ten years at 
Bradford High School, his 
hometown. There he was 
coach for both the 
basketball and golf teams. 
At Bradford he led his 
basketball team to nine 
district titles and his golf 
team to two district titles. 
Coach Hansen had also 
been head golf coach of 
University of Pittsburgh at 
Bradford for three years 
and a professional golf 
player for several years. 

Hal R. Hansen was 
described as very easy 
going, generous, 
enthusiastic person with a 
smile and a kind word to 
share. He also loved 



teaching. His first love was 
basketball, but he was a 
proficient golf pro. When 
he wasn't working with the 
golf team, he traveled to 
basketball games all over 
the state. Clarion's men's 
basketball coach, Ronald 
Righter, considered him a 
wise guru who provided 
good support and wisdom. 
In fact. Coach Hansen 
passed away after just 
watching Clarion's 
women's basketball team 
play against Shippensburg 
University in Tippen 
Gymnasium. He never held 
an official basketball 
coach position but was 
always welcomed on any 
court. Coach Hansen just 
plainly loved to work with 
kids no matter what the 
sport. He will definitely be 
sorely missed by oil the 
players he has worked 
with over the years. As a 
final salute, the 1989, 26th 
Annual Invitational Golf 
Tournament at Indiana 
University of Pennsylvania 
was dedicated to Clarion's 
Head Coach, Hal R. 
Hansen. 

-Michael Dupree 

-Page Design By 
Wendy Sue Wieland 




Beloved Coach Hal R, Hansen 



Sports 



209 



The Year 




Clarion University was represented by anottier beautiful 
homecoming queen during the annual Autumn Leaf Festival. 
India Baker was crowned as Clarion University's 1988 Home- 
coming Queen. Baker was escorted by the popular Mike 
Mario vits at the homecoming ceremonies 

Vice President George Bush, a presidential candidate in 1988, 
won the endorsement in New Orleans. His choice for running 
mate was unexpected-Senator Dan Quail of Indiana. De- 
spite Quail's unpopularity. Bush won the election and became 
the 40th President of the United States. 

Student Senator Bob Wyor was elected as President of the 
Clarion University Student Senate. Keith Champagne, a grad- 
uate student at Clarion, initially challenged Wyar but accept- 
ed the vice-presidential nomination. Together, Wyar and 
Champagne initiated several bold changes at CUP. 



Current Events 



210 



In Review 



1988- 1989 

r 




Heavyweight boxer Mike Tyson married actress Robin Gi- 
vens. Their stormy relationship lasted less than a year be- 
fore she filed for divorce. Givens was accused of marrying 
"Iron Mike" for his money, but she said that she wouldn't 
take a dime. 

Michael Dukakis, Gov. of Massachusetts, and Senator 
Lloyd Bentson of Texas lost the 1988 presidential cam- 
paign. Dukakis later announced that he would not run for 
re-election at the end of his term as governor. 

Dr. Thomas Bond, President of Clarion University, an- 
nounced his resignition as president in April. Bond accept- 
ed a new position as President of Eastern New Mexico 
University. 



Page Design by James Dentel 



Current Events 



211 




President Ronald Reagan and Soviet ieader Mikhail Gorbachev worked together for 
many years to improve foreign relations, in 1988, a treaty was signed to eliminate 
certain American and Soviet nuclear weapons. 

Marilyn Quail, wife of Senator Dan Quail of Indiana, visited Clarion. Pennsylvania. Mrs. 
Quail, campaigning for the Republican Party, spoke to Clarion community members 
and university students. 

Gretchen Elizabeth Carlson became Miss America 1989. The 22 year-old Miss Minne- 
sota is a Harvard-trained lawyer. She is also the first classical violinist to win the Miss 
America Crown. 

The Los Angeles Dodgers won The World Series in October of 1988. The Dodgers 
captured the title with a 5-2 victory over the Okland A's in the fifth game of the 
series 



Contributing Ptiotographer 



Current Events 



212 



?K!?SSf5i^*S?'S'''? 





Maria Battista became Miss Northwestern Pennsylvania at a ceremony field at Clarion 
University. Battista, a classical pianist, captured first place in the talent competition. She 
also received a $700 scholarship. 

Canadian Benn Johnson beat his arch rival, Carl Lewis, to the finish of the 100-meter 
race at the 1988 Summer Olympics in Seoul. Korea. Johnson won the gold medal, but 
was later disqualified after traces of an anabolic steroid were found in his system. 

Phi Sigma Kappa dug in deep during the tug -of -war competition during Greek Week 
1989. Their efforts proved a success, as they came in first for the fraternities in the all 
around greek battle. 

Clarion University heavy weight wrestler, Kurt Angle, was selected by the USA Wrestling 
Team to compete against a Soviet team. Angle traveled to Istanbul, Turkey in Febru- 
ary, where he captured second place honors in the 220 pound weight class. 



Design by James Dentel 



Current Events 



213 




man s "",-,* = o\ ^^^ 



•■^rls^tf^'- 



Closing 



214 




University sidewalks are nearly impassable with students walking 
hurriedly to classes during the school year. 

Though Clarion is an exciting and busy campus, its rural setting 
makes it easy to find quiet oasises. 




The child's eye marbled and milked, 

rushes past the colored shreds through turquoise and 

gold, 

chestnuts and red, down the shatt 

where sun crushed hues are said to bathe 

an occasional soul or two in drips and snatches. 

The face all flushed, half out of his head 
the tube is clutched, dew on the grass 
a morning mist shoots steam on green, 
it puffs at his shoes. 

Ah, the magic sunrise, 

I'm alive, he cries. 

The trees are aflame, autumn yellows 

streak the hills once again, with blonde hair flowing 

and blue jeans torn, his brass-coppered shirt 

checkers the form through the fields. 

Where one eye spies the changing lens, 

the other gapes away to a brown picket fence 

he must hurtle or fall, and such is life 

But just one more look please, at that prismatic light. 

Surely, time will allow 

the swirled endeavor that is at this moment 

now and forever, 

in the eyes of a child. 

-Eric Young 
-Page Design 
By Wendy Wieland 



Closing 



215 



Tada. It's finally here. The ever popular, much 
anticipated 1988-89 Sequelle. We, the Sequelle 
Staff, are excited to present to you a publication 
for you and about you. 

It wasn't easy. In fact, to no one is this book 
probably more anticipated than our staff. We 
began as five anxious individuals with different 
thoughts and ideas of what this year's Sequelle 
should be. We became one team sharing and 
developing our kaleidoscopic view of life on Clar- 
ion's campus. There were a few all-nighters, and 
many long days. There were migraines and com- 
puter eye strains, writer's block and writer's 
cramp. We fought and forgave, loved and 
loathed, cringed and celebrated, but most im- 
portantly we learned. The experience was price- 
less and somewhere on our list of the year's trials 
and tribulations we had fun. 

On the pages of the 1988-89 Sequelle we 
have attempted to capture the diversity, 
uniqueness, and originality of Clarion University. 
We hope that our presentation is accurate and 
slightly personal to each and every Clarion Stu- 
dent, Many people worked on this book including 
staff members, editors, and administration. We 
appreciate the hard work and dedication they 
have put towards this endeavor. We couldn't 
have done it without you. 

So, here you are Clarion. All of you. The Kalei- 
doscope of Clarion University. 

-The 1988-89 Sequelle Editors 




Mary Retort prepares gathers her study efforts and a bundle 
books in preparation for a torturous finals week. 





5,^ P^o^ogtoP"^' 



rr>srr.™psr 



.rtvatdarea 



ff'P^ofogrophe. 




*-ss^^s..,o»„_ 



One thing's for sure. Clarion students aren't shy 
-. They always have at least a little smile for the cam- 
t" era. 



Closing 



217 



Beth Alberta 

113 Crestmont Drive 

Shippenville, PA 16254 

William Alexander 
Rd 1 Box 178 
Stoneboro, PA 16153 

Sandy Allen 
810 Etna Street 
Mckees Rock. PA 15136 



Christine Bauer 

223 Grandview Road 

St. Marys. PA 15857 

Lee Baughman 
RD 1 Box 269 
Jeannette. PA 15644 

Wayne Bauman 
52 Elbrook Drive 
Allendale, NJ 07401 



Michael Blair 
60 School Street 
Pittsburgh. PA 15220 

Kenneth Blawas 
RD 6 Rose Avenue 
Irwin. PA 15642 

Beth Blazetic 

22 Concord Drive. RD 1 1 

Irwin. PA 15642 



John Bronico 

2508 Coleshire Drive 

Piano. TX 75070 

Melissa Brothers 

RD 3 

Grove City. PA 16127 

Nanette Brown 

2411 Ridge wood Court 

New Castle. PA 16101 



Mark Allison 

944 Sarlyn Drive 

N, Huntington, PA 15642 

Steven Alston 
8021 Rugby 
Philadelphia, PA 19150 

Linda Ambrose 
439 Conn, Avenue 
Rochester. PA 15074 

Larry Anderson 

1111 Pershing Avenue 

Brockway, PA 15824 

Alfred Angiolieri 
613 Buffalo Street 
Franklin. PA 16323 

Kimberly Anthony 
512 Humphrey Rd 
Greensburg, PA 15601 

David Archinal 
Box 1387 
Hermitage. PA 16148 

Timothy Artman 
1715 Morton Avenue 
West Mifflin. PA 15122 

Leah Audio 

121 Cherrytree Rd 

Carnegie. PA 15106 

Ed Bachner 

115 Lennox Drive 

Penn Hills, PA 15235 

Bret Baillie 
1515 6th Street 
Ford City, PA 15853 

Brenda Baker 
507 Dewey Street 
Ridgwoy, PA 15853 

Karen Balint 

490 Old Form Road 

Pittsburgh. PA 15228 

Bernice Bamburak 

Rd 1 Box 321 

New Alexandria. PA 15670 

India Barker 

36 Sherman Avenue 

Dobbs Ferry. NY 10522 

Patricia Barr 
RD 2, Box 59-B 
Curwensville, PA 16833 

Ray Bartolli 

330 Bast Drive 

West Mifflin, PA 15122 

Mike Bates 
505 Curtis Street 
Philipsburg, PA 16866 



David Bayline 

407 Hillside Avenue 

Port Allegany. PA 16743 

Dale Beck 
Rd 2 Box 52 
Brockway. PA 15824 

Tammy Beck 
Long Level 
Johnsonburg, PA 15845 

Pamela Bell 
412 Park Avenue 
Clearfield, PA 16830 

Jane Bender 
10 Lemon Way 
Koppel. PA 16136 

Ann Bendig 

146 Monitor Avenue 

Pittsburgh. PA 15202 

Maryanne Benjamin 
633 Center Street 
St, Marys. PA 15857 

Julie Bennett 

226 Colorado Drive 

Erie, PA 16505 

Timothy Benninger 
225 Park Avenue 
Oil City. PA 16301 

Marvin Bergman 

1911 4th Street 01-C Apt 1 

Altoona. PA 16601 

Annette Bergstrom 

RD 3 Box 144 

Sugar Grove. PA 16350 

Jacquelynn Berkowitz 
261-Valley View Estate 
Oxford. NJ 07863 

Ruth Bermudez 

1578 Wensley 

El Centre. CA 92243 

Kendra Bershok 
124 Painter Street 
Level Green. PA 15085 

Yann Best 

135 Cedar Avenue 

Oil City, PA 16301 

Mary Biesiadny 

4563 Georgette 

North Olmsted. OH 44070 

Juli Black 

206 Center Church Street 

Mcmurray. PA 15317 

Brian Blaho 

305 Sutton Place 

Wexford. PA 15090 



Pamela Bleggi 
625 Virginia Road 
ST. Marys, PA 15857 

Laura Bliley 

4410 C Colonial Pkwy 

Erie. PA 16509 

Yolanda Bongiovanni 
1623 Central Avenue 
Highland Park. NJ 08904 

John Boozel 

185 Nursery Rood 

Renfrew, PA 16053 

Louis Bornes 
529 Leona Street 
Sharpsville, PA 16150 

Michele Bosaz 
13 Sylvia Drive 
Wappingers Fa, NY 12590 

Michaeline Botti 
23 Rolling Road 
Mars. PA 16046 

Elizabeth Bowman 
543 W. Jackson Street 
York, PA 17403 

BIyth Boyer 

121 Eokin Avenue 

Pittsburgh, PA 15214 

Lisa Bradley 

2461 Woodstock Avenue 

Pittsburgh. PA 15218 

Catherine Brady 
207 Holly Street 
Trucksville. PA 18708 

Robert Brant 

514 Shenango Drive 

Greenville. PA 16125 

Dorci Bratter 
Bedell Road 
Amowolk, NY 10501 

Barbara Braunbeck 

P.O. Box 64 

Antes Fort. PA 17720 

Chris Breeger 

199 Short Street 

North Hunting. PA 15642 

Mary Brennen 

862 S. Michael Road 

St. Marys. PA 15857 

Daniel Brinley 

771 Buttergield Drive 

N, Huntington. PA 15642 

Melissa Brison 
Wabash Avenue 
Parker, PA 16049 



Debbie Bruno 
9860 Newhart Blvd. 
Wexford. PA 15090 

Marjorie Bucholz 
317 W 6th Street 
Oil City. PA 16301 

Kimberly Burford 

203 Creekwood Drive 

Zelienople. PA 16063 

Karl Burns 

10778 Lockhart Road 

Philadelphia. PA 19116 

Beth Bushyeoger 
1243 Tidewood Drive 
Bethel Park. PA 15102 

Jeffrey Butler 

974 Plymouth Road 

Norristown. PA 19401 

Rachael Busin 

608 Sumner Avenue 

New Castle, PA 16105 

Roberta Byrd 

2601 Duquesne Place, Apt 205 

Duquesne, PA 15110 

Miriam Calvarese 
135 Arnold Road 
Ardmore. PA 19003 

Lisa Carberry 

401 East Fifth Avenue 

Warren. PA 16365 

Keith Cecchini 

160 Sprucehoven Drive 

Wexford, PA 15090 

Carl Ceglar 

Rear 248 Second Street 

Conemaugh. PA 15909 

Wai Kwan Chan 

195 St, Patrick Street Apt 9096 

Toronto. Ontario 

Rudy Cincala 

216 Altermoor Drive 

Norono Heights, PA 15065 

Steve Cindrich 
82 Maple Avenue 
Aliquippa. PA 15001 

Sharin Clark 

527 West Walnut Street 

Titusville. PA 16354 

Amelia Clayton 
433 Mark Road 
St. Marys. PA 15857 

Annette Clemens 
405 Chestnut Street 
New Bethlehem. PA 16242 



Directory 



218 



Gregory Clemenson 
1716 13th Street 
Altoona. PA 16601 

Vickie Clerrients 

RD 1 

Knox, PA 16232 

Jonna Coachman 
RD 2 Box 230 Lot 92 
Shippenville, PA 16254 

Tim Cochran 

Knox Village Apts #6 

Knox, PA 16232 

Geoprgina Cole 
RD 1 Box 138-d 
Spring Mills, PA 16875 

Kevin Collier 

24 W Main Street 

Clarion, PA 16214 

Catherine Collins 
1 15 Highview Drive 
Pittsburgh, PA 15241 

Monica Collins 

2416 Airacobra Street 

Levittov/n, PA 19057 

Tracy Conner 
237 W John Street 
Bedford, PA 15522 

Michael Connors 

114 Crescent Gordons 

Pittsburgh, PA 15235 

Debbie Cook 
RD 1 Box 5 
Ickesburg, PA 17037 

Gino Cook 

5219 W. 52nd Street 

Fairvievi/, PA 16415 

Ray Cope 
P.O. Box 446 
Shippenville, PA 16254 

Peter Corey 

4328 W. Whitehall Road 

PA Furnace, PA 16865 

Kam Cotter 

Box 106 

Brisbin, PA 16620 

Deborah Crondall 
144 Pleasant Street 
Bradford, PA 16701 

Bonnie Crate 
RD 7 Box 61 
Venus, PA 16364 

Janet Cressman 

RD 2 Box 84 

Center Valley, PA 18034 

Chris Cromer 
616 Locust Street 
Turtle Creek, PA 15145 



Donald Custer 
RD 3 Box 183 
Emienton, PA 16373 

Gina D'Andrea 
100 Duncan Blvd 
Warren, PA 16365 

Debro Davis 
RD 2 Box 157 
Moyport, PA 16240 

John Davis 

Lot 13 Oakwood Acres 

Clarion, PA 16214 

Erin DeBacco 

RD 1 Box 15 Apt B 

Strattonville, PA 16258 

Mark DeCroo 

101 McWilliams Drive 

Natrona Heights, PA 15065 

Mary DeCroo 

101 McWilliams Drive 

Natrona Heights, PA 15065 

Gregory Deemer 
8580 Perry Highway 
Erie, PA 16509 

Geri DeFelice 
14 Greenleaf 
Greensburg, PA 15601 

Diane DeMorchi 
763 William Drive 
Trofford, PA 15085 

Michelle Dean 

Rd 1 Box 561 

New Castle, PA 16105 

Shelley Deeter 
45 Oxford Street 
Bradford, PA 16701 

Down Deivert 

681 Westerly Parkway 

State College, PA 16801 

Mary Dellane 
427B Pinehurst Apt 
Clarion, PA 16214 

Laurie Dennis 

Box 70 

Ashville, NY 14710 

Deborah Detsch 
631 Sherry Rood 
St. Marys, PA 15857 

Marina DiMartino 
1 104 Cherry Street 
Latrobe, PA 15650 

Donald Dickson 
Box 211 RD 1 
Dallas, PA 18612 

Sherri Dingei 
RD 5 Box 5349 
Mercer,PA 16137 



Valda Dodson 
2025 N 16th Street 
Philadelphia. PA 19121 

Ed Donovan 

9 Woodcrest Blvd. 

Kenmore, NY 14223 

Richard Dopkosky 
1001 Goskill Avenue 
Jeannette, PA 15644 

John Doron 
RD 3 Box 313-A 
Clarion, PA 16214 

Elizabeth Dornbrock 
129 Crestmont Drive 
Shippenville, PA 16254 

Verna Douglass 
RD 2 Box 105 
Kennerdell, PA 16374 

Ramon Dourado 
1458 Penn Avenue 
Pittsburgh, PA 15221 

Karen Duffy 
385 Plum Street 
Oakmont, PA 15139 

Clarence Dupree 

1609 N. Lawrence Street 

Philadelphia, PA 19122 

Erika Durst 
18 Avenue B 
Coudersport, PA 16915 

Angela Dykins 
Bokx 111 RD 3 
Titusville, PA 16354 

Andrea Dzadony 
746 Lindsay Road 
Carnegie, PA 15106 

Christine Eaker 
RD 1 Box 147 
Corsica, PA 15829 

Christine Eaton 
312 Jackson 
Warren, PA 16365 

Jane Eckstrom 
815 Thorn Street 
Sewickley, PA 15143 

Jennifer Elder 

Rd4 

Butler, PA 16001 

Steven Engel 

207 S. Kennedy Road 

Sterling, VA 22170 

Kathy Engle 

825 East Main Street 

Reynoldsville, PA 15851 

Barbara Erdesky 
1 Hempfield Avenue 
Greenville, PA 16125 



David Farquhor 

444 Amherst Avenue 

Coraopolis, PA 15108 

Nichola Fedorczyk 
45 Davis Street #10 
Greenville, PA 16125 

Lorraine Feldmeier 
1 130 Fidelity Drive 
Pittsburgh, PA 15236 

Michele Finch 
8136 Lincoln Road 
Verona, PA 15147 

Stephanie Finn 
Rd 4 Penn Gables 
Ebensburg, PA 15931 

Thomas Finnerty 
4903 Lucerne Avenue 
Pittsburgh, PA 15214 

Shannon Fitzgerald 
187 North Avenue 
Pittsburgh, PA 15202 

Robert Fix 

RD 1 Box 31a-1 

Hollstead, PA 18822 

Glenn Fleck 
RD 1 Box 147 a 
Curwensville, PA 16833 

Thomas Foley 

4198 Wellington Drive 

Bethlehem, PA 18017 

Alan Foreman 

RD 2 Gearhart Toad 

Pulaski,PA 16143 

Thomas Forsey 

Rd 3 Box 472 Randall Drive 

New Castle, PA 16105 

James Fortney 
106 Penn Hill Drive 
Schnecksville, PA 18078 

Maureen Freimuth 
RD 2 Box 43 
Valencia. PA 16059 

Amy Jo Frey 

RD 1 Box 80-b 

Mt Pleasant, PA 15666 

Robert Fry 

1774 Parkview Blvd. 

Hermitage, PA 16148 

Tara Fry 

106 Gilfillan Street 

Franklin, PA 16323 

Stephen Furdak 
124 E Bloss Street 
Titusville, PA 16364 

John Galbo 

704 Davenport Street 

Meadville, PA 16335 



David Crouse 

229 Constitution Avenue 

Bradford, PA 16701 

Blaine Curran 

6233 Heberton Drive 

Verona. PA 15147 



Dale Ditz 

205 Miller Street 

Sheffield. PA 16347 

Yvonne Dobrzanski 
313 Mckim Street 
Zelienople. PA 16063 



Todd Evans 

5086 Lantern Hill Drive 

Pittsburgh, PA 15236 

Nichola Fedorczyk 
45 Davis Street #10 
Greenville. PA 16125 



Sheila Gastiger 

RD 1 

Friedens.PA 15541 

Maria Gatesman 
Box 6-A Maple Drive 
Lucinda, PA 16235 



Directory 



219 



Andrea Gavel 
1747 Sillview Drive 
Pittsburgh, PA 15243 

Agnes George 
612 Barker Street 
Lilly. PA 15938 

Cattierine Gerrich 
600 Joan Street 
Mars, PA 16046 

Deidre Geyer 

3727 Middleboro Road 

Castle Shannon, PA 15234 

Denise Glivic 
2875 O'neill Drive 
Bethel Park, PA 15102 

Tricia Gluvna 
13788 Stewart Road 
Corry, PA 16407 

Geno Goxhnour 

1596 William Penn Avenue 

Conemaugh, PA 15909 

Christopher Golemi 
23 Davies Drive 
Wappinger Falls, NY 12590 

Nancy Gourley 
1286 Corp Street 
Beaver, PA 15009 

Michelle Grabowski 
9535 Bliley Road 
Erie, PA 16510 

Ronald Graybill 

115 Winters ville Road 

Myerstown, PA 17067 

Molly Greenawalt 

RD 1 

Strattanville, PA 16258 

Loretha Greene 

1844 Point Breeze Avenue 

Philadelphia, PA 19145 

Constance Grego 
5036 Bahama Drive 
Pittsburgh, PA 15239 

Karen Gregory 
RD 2 Box 404 
Albion, PA 16401 

Wendy Grosch 
RD 3 Box 105 
Emienton, PA 16373 

Karen Gross 
327 Sarver Road 
Sarver. PA 16055 

Carol Grubb 

3454 Columbia Street 

Whitehall, PA 18052 

Michele Guisewite 

RD1 

Aaronsburg, PA 16820 

Linda Gunn 

805 Sleepy Hollow Road 

Pittsburgh, PA 15234 

Linda Guntrum 

231 Wilson Avenue, Apt F 

Clarion, PA 16214 



Janice Gustafson 
Barkaboom Road 
Andes, NY 13731 

William Haas 
RD 3 Box 490 
Willimsport. PA 17701 

Diane Habjan 
Route 2 Box 84A 
Clarion, PA 16214 

Nancy Hall 

2336 Hidden Timber Drive 

Pittsburgh, PA 15241 

Victoria Hall 

430 N. Washington Street 

Butler, PA 16001 

Brian Hamilton 
3086 Amy Drive 
Library, PA 15129 

Annette Hargenrader 
1 1 15 W, 2nd Street 
Oil City, PA 16301 

Catherine Hartle 
Rd 1 box S41 
Lucindo, PA 16235 

Erin Hartle 
Rd 1 box 58 
Brookville, PA 15825 

Nancy Hartwell 
RD 3 Box 18 
Brookville, PA 15825 

Michael Haspel 
111 12th Street 
Greenville, PA 16125 

Patricio Houber 
3115 W, 25th Street 
Erie, PA 16506 

Amy Haun 

Box 7 

Knox, PA 16232 

Carolyn Howley 
4005 Winchester Road 
Erie, PA 16506 

Douglas Hayward 
400 Lingle Street 
Osceola Mills, PA 16666 

Lisa Heeter 

Box 8 

Knox, PA 16232 

Jeri Heffran 

1121 Freeport Toad 

Natrona Hts, PA 15065 

Elizabeth Heidenriech 
400 Shodyhill Rood 
Pittsburgh, PA 15205 

Robert Heming 

Box 801 

Ligonier, PA 15658 

Colin Henkes 
RD Box 218 
Summerville, PA 15864 

Brian Henry 

423 Linwood Drive 

Bethel Park, PA 15102 



David Hernon 
RD 3 Box 296 
Clarion, PA 16214 

Scott Higgins 

1952 Worcester Drive 

Pittsburgh, PA 15243 

Cliftord Himes 

212 Penn Street 

New Bethlehem, PA 16242 

Sharon Hixson 

11171 Mockingbird Drive 

N. Huntingdon, PA 15642 

Kathleen Hodgson 
119 Trinidad Street 
Butler, PA 16001 

Patrick Hoenig 

472 Conneticut Avenue 

Rochester, PA 15074 

Vicki Hoffman 

950 North 17th Street 

Allentown, PA 18104 

Barbara Hoover 
Snydersburg. PA 16257 



Keith Hoppe 

2774 W. Munrow Street 

Bethel Park, PA 15102 

Jennifer Houllion 
123 Eckstein Road 
Renfrew, PA 16053 

Nancy Hovanec 
505 Penn Street 
Pittsburgh, PA 15227 

Meoghon Hrabovsky 
309 Ninth Street 
Ford City, PA 16226 

Kimberly Hudak 

100 Cerasi Drive Apt. 615 

West Mifflin, PA 15122 

Barry Hudson 
RD 3 Box 254 
Cochranton, PA 16314 

Jeffrey Hudson 

Box 236 

Polk, PA 16342 

Nancy Huff 
RD 1 Box 393 
Osceola Mills, PA 16666 

Paula Huffman 

RD 5 Box 338 

Mt, Pleasant, PA 15666 

Mary Hughes 
RD 1 Box 393 
Osceola Mills, PA 16666 

Beth Hull 

721 Potomac Avenue 

Erie, PA 16505 

Lisa Inderlied 

1600 Wintergreen Lane 

Fairview, PA 16415 

Scott Inglese 

146 Belleau Wood Blvd 

Trafford, PA 15085 



David Inzona 

1 195 Hewitt Street 

Brockwoy, PA 15824 

Rodney John 

Box 476 

East Brady, PA 16028 

Arthur Johnson 

259 Monterey Avenue 

Ridgwoy, PA 15853 

Cheryl Johnson 

6 E Woodcrest Drive 

Warren, PA 16365 

Jill Johnston 

7 1 1 Pauline Drive 

Philipsburg, PA 16866 

Robin Jonas 
1932 Wood Place 
Glenshaw, PA 15116 

Mary Joy 

RD 2 Box 2830 

Mercer, PA 16137 

Michelle Jurkovic 
610 S, Geary Street 
Mt. Pleasant, PA 15666 

Kristin Kearney 
RD 1 Box 273f 
Hickory, PA 15340 

Shelli Kearney 
7702 Cannon Street 
Pittsburgh, PA 15218 

Sharon Keller 

RD 1 

Fairmount City, PA 16224 

Debora Kempka 

Box 144 

Slickville, PA 15684 

Debbie Kennedy 
97 W. 3rd Street 
Hughesville, PA 17737 

Susan Kennedy 
107 Hutchmon Rood 
Mars, PA 16046 

Rhonda Kennemuth 
Main Street 
Seneca, PA 16346 

Aaron Kijowski 

2338 Pleasant View Drive 

Ford City, PA 16226 

Steven Kijowski 
RD 2 Box 128-E 
Zelienople, PA 16063 

Stacey Kimble 
RD 5 Box 179 
Tyrone, PA 16686 

Edward Kinch 

RD 1 

Shippenville, PA 16254 

Kelly Kouss 

105 Fir wood Drive 

Pittsburgh, PA 15239 

Roian Koerber 
1500 Florida Avenue 
Pittsburgh, PA 15221 



220 



Directory 



Dawn Kolacinski 
213 Evans Street 
Mt. Pleasant. PA 15666 

Tonni Kotowski 

56 Aluminum City Terr 

New Kensington, PA 15068 

Debra Kotulo 
1512 Beaver Rood 
Ambridge, PA 15003 

Michael Kowalski 
25 Sunbirch Drive 
Jeannette, PA 15644 

Paul Kraus 

1020D Chatham Park Drive 

Pittsburgh, PA 15216 

Lisa Kreider 

27 North Lincoln Street 

Palmyra, PA 17078 

Charles Krempa 
5418 Devon Circle 
Pipersville, PA 18947 

Mary Kristoff 

4002 Everlawn Street 

West Mifflin, PA 15122 

Jeffrey Kuhn 

101 Chestnut Street 
Fredonia, PA 16124 

Michael Kuhno 
36 Elbow Lane 
Lonsdale, PA 19446 

Barbara Kunkle 
2 Scotts Drive 
Oil City, PA 16301 

Jeanne Kunkle 

102 Chestnut Street 
Hellertown, PA 18055 

Jennifer Kunkle 
843 Pine Run Road 
Apollo, PA 15613 

Ruth Kurdilla 

RD 3 Box 153 

Belle Vernon, PA 15012 

Sandra Kuzio 

1518 Mt. Royal Blvd. 

Glenshaw, PA 15116 

Maureen Lafferty 
517 Perry Highway 
Pittsburgh. PA 15229 

Julianne Landis 
233 George Street 
Hanover. PA 17331 

Edward Lane 
208 Aican Drive 
Pittsburgh. PA 15239 

Gretchen Lascek 

104 Opal Court 

Natrona Heights, PA 15065 

Sharon Laslavic 
421 Sussex Drive 
Zelienople, PA 16063 

Barbara Lavan 
RD 1 Box 181d 
Lucinda PA 16235 



Lisa Lavan 

Box 56 

Shippen villa. PA 16254 

Vicki Lazar 

101 Grouse Drive 

Elisaveth. PA 15037 

Lori LeBarron 

122 Orchard Street 

Franklin. PA 16323 

Eric Lee 

2 Royal Street 

Wilkes-barre. PA 18702 

Kathleen Leone 
5152 Crestwood Drive 
Clifton Heights. Pa 19018 

Ciaran Lesikar 

5440 Foliriver row Ct. 

Columbia, MD 21044 

Stacey Levy 

2026 Brookfield Road 

Pittsburgh. PA 15243 

Francine Liberto 

268 Lynn Ann Drive 

New Kensington. PA 15068 

Fyaro Liew 
Box 10202 
Malysia 

Terry Ligday 
201 Church Place 
Pittsburgh, PA 15216 

Leslie Lindahl 

Box 187 

Rew, PA 16744 

Janet Lindsay 

708 Fourteenth Street 

Franklin, PA 16323 

Tammy Lininger 

399 E. Jamestown toad 

Greenville, PA 16125 

Laura Link 

338 West Sunbury Road 

Butler, PA 16001 

Paul Liprando 

RD 1 

Export, PA 15632 

Victor Lisotto 
2676 Sunset Lane 
Allison Park, PA 15101 

William Llewellyn 

8390 Buzzard Road 

N. Huntingdon, PA 15642 

Stepheny Lojiu 
S.R.K. Stella 
Malaysia 

Larry Loreman 
Box 7767 RD 3 
Jonestown, PA 17038 

Greg Loscar 

3933 Gibsonia Road 

Gibsonia, PA 15044 

Duane Luckenbill 

Box 26 129 W. 2nd Street 

Bernville. PA 19506 



Patrick Lucas 

120 Morningside Drive 

Butlar. PA 16001 

Kathryn Ludwig 
4829 3rd Avenue 
Bensalem. PA 19020 

Karen MacVay 

RD 2 

Emienton. PA 16373 

Brian Mack 

6758 Stenton Avenue 

Philadelphia. PA 19150 

Stephanie Madden 
504 Zephyr Drive 
Erie. PA 16505 

Marjorie Major 

24 Coachman Drive 

Penfield. NY 14526 

James Moloney 
2608 Wyncote Road 
Pittsburgh. PA 15102 

Debra Marchand 
RD 1 Box 177-b 
Tionesta. PA 16353 

Kelly Marek 

324 Fairmont Drive 

Hermitage. PA 16148 

Carolann Marianna 
1439 Second Street 
Natona Heights. PA 15066 

Michelle Marko 
125 Alpen Drive 
Mount Gretna. PA 17064 

Rhea Martin 
RD Box 276 
Spartensburg, PA 16434 

Zelma Martin 

215 Halyday Street 

Oil City, PA 16301 

Anthony Martinez 
3333 Valewood Drive 
Munhoil, PA 15120 

Roberta Mascari 
22 Bellevue Avenue 
Pittsburgh, PA 15229 

Kimberly Mason 
RD 4 Box 249 
Brookville, PA 15825 

Diane Master 
137 Gilmore Drive 
Pittsburgh, PA 15235 

Susan Mata 
301 Jacob Drive 
Pittsburgh, PA 15235 

Mary Matherne 

RD 1 

Rochester Mills, PA 15771 

Scott Maxwell 
RD 3 Box 506 
Oswego, NY 13126 

Douglas May 
7027 Route 322 
Williamsfield, OH 44093 



Dennis Mazur 

1300 Berryman Avenue 

Bethel Park, PA 15102 

Debra McAdams 
629 Stoneridge Drive 
Allison Park, PA 15101 

Robert McAdams 
578 Sells Lane 
Breensburg, PA 15601 

Lisa McAdoo 

1410 Birchwood Avenue 

Roslyn, PA 19001 

Rebecca McCabe 

Box 221 

Clarion, PA 16214 

Ann McCall 

RD 1 

Sligo, PA 16255 

Kathleen McCarthy 
1 1 Hartzdale Drive 
Camp Hill, PA 17011 

Robert McCarthy 
5172 Ferndale Place 
Fairview, PA 16415 

Sandra McCollough 

Box 143 

Bruin, PA 16022 

Cathleen McConnell 
775 N, Keel Ridge Road 
Hermitage. PA 16148 

Penny McDole 
RD 3 Box 260 
Brockway. PA 15824 

Mary McGervey 
1311 Grouse Drive 
Pittsburgh. PA 15243 

Anita McKlaine 

1419 Wuonomaker Street 

Philadelphia. PA 19131 

Timothy McMeans 
659 W. Main Street 
Sheffield. PA 16347 

Cathy McMillen 
519 Piter Street 
Dubois. PA 15801 

Coanne McNiff 
Box 3175 
Gettysburg. PA 17325 

Melissa McQuillen 

Box 88 

West Decatur. PA 16878 

David Meier 

735 Center Street 

St Marys. PA 15857 

Jeffrey Millar 

1017 Zimmerman Street 

Jeannette. PA 15644 

Barbara Miller 

265 Foirhoven Drive 

Lower Burreil. PA 15068 

Julie Miller 

Box 181 

Shippen ville. PA 16254 



Directory 



221 






I 

i 



I 
t 



I 



w. 






Jonathan Mitchell 
RD 2 Box 95 
Darlington, PA 16115 

Joan Mix 

203 Water Street 

Smethport, PA 16749 

Peter Molinaro 
608 Beech Street 
Warren. PA 16365 

Michael Montedoro 
352 Golden Gate 
Verona. PA 15147 

Tracy Montgomery 
Box 37C RD 1 
Cranberry, PA 16319 

Corina Moore 

RD2 

Templeton, PA 16259 

Tracy Moore 
419 Hill Street 
Curwensville, PA 16833 

Diane Morgan 
935 Linden Street 
Sharon. PAa 16146 

Judy Morgan 
513 North Court 
Dubois. PA 15801 

Neil Morgan 

1553 Queensbury Street 

Pittsburgh. PA 15205 

Todd Moser 
4940 Ball Avenue 
West Mifflin, PA 15122 

Bonnie Muho 
1732 Worton Blvd 
West Mifflin. PA 15122 

Dawn Muroski 

531 Clarion Avenue 

Johnsonburg. PA 15845 

Dave Murphey 
18 Edwards Street 
Bradford. PA 16701 

Allyson Myers 

RD 3 Oak wood Acres Lot 5 

Clarion. PA 16214 

Robin Myers 

RD 1 Box 281 

Jersey Shore. PA 17740 

Kathryn Neal 

436 3 Degree Road 

Renfrew. PA 16053 

Kathleen Noir 

2020 N Hermitage Road 

Sharpsville. PA 16150 

Jeffrey Nuhfer 
174 E. Main Street 
Bradford. PA 16701 

Theodore O'Malley 
6600 Virginia Avenue 
Pittsburgh. PA 15202 

Kenton O'Neil 
RD 2 Box 65 
Seneca. PA 16346 



Timothy O'Neil 
Star Route 
Cranberry, PA 16319 

Melissa O'Rourke 
1722 Turkey Farm 
N, Huntington, PA 15642 

Christopher Ookes 

RD2 

Brook ville, PA 15825 

Lynn Olsen 

225 Church Street 

Sheffield, PA 16347 

Alicia Opal 

1331 Pennsylvania Avenue 

Oakmont, PA 15139 

Lynn Paczkowski 
16 Thomas Rood 
South Amboy, NJ 08879 

Lori Page 

403 Euclid Avenue 

Dravosburg, PA 15034 

Jennifer Palazzo 
340 Saline River Drive 
Saline, Ml 48176 

Laura Parmele 
123 Hickory Rood 
State College, PA 16801 

Joyce Pasquorette 

Box 523 

Clarion, PA 16214 

Gary Patterson 
Route 2 Box 233 
Beaver Falls, PA 15010 

Matthew Pearson 

RD 1 

New Wilmington, PA 16142 

Scott Pegram 
RD 6 Box 2610 
Mt. Pleasant, PA 15666 

Joseph Perhach 
637 Shadyside Drive 
West Mifflin, PA 15122 

Ellen Perlman 

57 Collins Avenue 

Bloomfield, NJ 07003 

Joseph Perrone 
Evergreen Ridge 
Fabius, NY 13063 

Damon Peters 
RD 1 Box 496 
Olanto, PA 16863 

Amy Pfeifer 

28 Valois Avenue 

Pittsburgh, PA 15205 

Diane Phelon 

129 Mill Pond Place 

Langhorne, PA 19047 

Sandra Piccirillo 

118 E, Oak wood Way 

New Castle, PA 16105 

Jodi Pifer 

Rd 1 Box 1051a 

Claredon, PA 16313 



Loretto Piper 
618 E, Walnut 
Titusville, PA 16354 

Roseann Pisano 

1602 Old Princeton Rood 

New Castle, PA 16101 

Christine Plumb 
627 Irvine Drive 
Erie, PA 16511 

Michael Popella 
101 Lora Road 
Jeannette, PA 15644 

Fred Port 

RD 1 

Clarion, PA 16214 

Todd Post 

9768 German Road 

North East, PA 16428 

Susan Prezel 
1003 Cork Drive 
Bethel Park, PA 15102 

Marcy Prystaloski 
RD Tomerack Drive 
Meadville, PA 16335 

Theresa Puskar 
Rd 3 Box 376d 
Latrobe, PA 15650 

Jacqueline Rafferty 
350 Ramado Drive 
Upper St, Clair, PA 15241 

Anita Ransel 

509 W, Market Street 

Clearfield, PA 16830 

Julie Rapsinski 
Rd 2 Box 60-n 
Tarentum, PA 15084 

Steve Reavy 

1138 South Keim Street 

Pottstowm, PA 19464 

Debra Reed 
122 Timmis 
Warren, PA 16365 

Renee Rehner 

107 Washington Street 

Freeport, PA 16229 

Roxane Reinsel 

Box 261 

Clarion, PA 16214 

Alan Reisfield 
365 Orendo Circle 
Westfield. NJ 07090 

Terri Repok 
6543 

Glenallen Avenue 
Solon. OH 44139 

Teresa Rerko 

Box 76 

Ramey, PA 16671 

Randall Resovsky 
605 Charles Street 
Lebanon. PA 17042 

Mary Retort 

11 W Beech wood Road 

Bessemer. PA 16112 



Nancy Richert 
9457 Peebles Rood 
Allison Park. PA 15101 

Eric Richey 
3424 Park Place 
Bethlehem. PA 18017 

Stephen Rifici 
8925 Kilkenny Circle 
Baltimore, MD 21236 

Dave Riley 

332 E, Spring Street 

Titusville, PA 16354 

Jill Rinderll 

4624 Duncan road 

Erie, PA 16505 

Amy Rippin 
205 Aria Drive 
Pittsburgh, PA 15220 

Shawn Ritts 
Route 1 Box 114 
Cranberry, PA 16319 

Pamela Roddy 

22 Clearfield Street 

Oil City, PA 16301 

Christopher Rojik 

802 Glenshaw Avenue 

Glenshaw, PA 15116 

Kevin Romine 

Box 771 

Sheffield, PA 16347 

John Root 

7216 curtze Drive 

Foirview, PA 16415 

Jacqueline Ross 

218 Raymond Avenue 

Brownsville, PA 15417 

Maureen Ross 

5709 Happy Hills Drive 

Bethel Park, PA 15102 

Kerrie Rossi 

B0 12 Cabin Hill Drive 

Greensburg, PA 15601 

Beth Roth 
1260 River Road 
Freeport, PA 16229 

Amy Rothen 
901 Chestnut 
Emienton, PA 16373 

Joanna Russell 

1402 Monterey Street 

Pittsburgh, PA 15212 

Lisa Russell 

2225 Wylond Avenue 

Allison Park, PA 15101 

Tracy Ryan 
74D Boone Drive 
Turtle Creek, PA 15145 

Linda Ryer 

329 Woodstone Drive 

Penn Hills, PA 15235 

Daniel Samarin 
1501 16th Avneue 
Beaver Falls. PA 15010 



Directory 



222 



Melody Sample 
1311 Baird Avenue 
Meadvilie. PA 16335 

Morgan Sands 

6953 Rosewood Street 

Pittsburgh, PA 15208 

Mark Sanner 
679 Grant Street 
Franklin, PA 16523 

Edward Sauer 

162 Second Avenue 

Pittsburgh, PA 15229 

Andrew Sayers 

214 North Third Street 

Dubois, PA 15801 

Sandra Schaltenbrand 

2602 High Street 

Natrona Heights, PA 15065 

Amy Schanck 
420 4th Avenue 
Beaver Falls, PA 15010 

Julia Scheel 

1018 Forsythe Road 

Carnegie, PA 15106 

Deeann Schirf 
Rd 2 Box 152 
Clarion, PA 16214 

Linda Schirmer 
RD 2 Box 457A 
Summerville, PA 15864 

Denise Schmidt 

437 Alpine Village Drive 

Monroeville, PA 15146 

Christine Schnur 
203 Westview Drive 
Butler, PA 16001 

Scott Schrecengost 
214 Crestmont Drive 
Shippenville, PA 16254 



Rebecca Seaman 

Box 67 

Grantville, PA 17028 

Sandra Seeler 

46 Buttonwood Drive 

Churchville, PA 18966 

Michael Seniow 
RD 1 Box 114c 
Avonmore, PA 15618 

Lisa Shocreaw 
RD 2 Box 251e 
Blairsville, PA 15717 

Kimberly Shaffer 
615 Fletcher Street 
Clearfield, PA 16830 

Dana Shannon 
2113 Pendleton Drive 
Monroeville, PA 15146 

Laura Shannon 

410 Lanewood Drive 

New Castle, PA 16105 

Lynne Shannon 
77 Euclid Avenue 
Bradford, PA 16701 

Michael Shapiro 
375 E 37 
Erie, PA 16504 

David Sheatz 

Box 77 

Cranberry, PA 16319 

Julie Shick 

606 Wood Street 

New Bethlehem, PA 16242 

Wendy Shick 

RD 2 

Templeton, PA 16259 

Debra Showers 
RD 1 Box 33 
Shippenville, PA 16254 



Chris Smith 

Box 777 

Knox, PA 16232 

Christine Smith 
2022 Wood Street 
Labrobe, PA 15650 

Lisa Smith 

8872 Willoughby Road 

Pittsburgh, PA 15237 

Susan Smith 

3667-A Blue Rock Road 

Lancaster, PA 17603 

Joseph Snodgrass 
1678 Lucetta Drive 
Monongahelo, PA 15063 

Donald Snyder 

Route 1 

Houtzdale, PA 16651 

Donna Snyder 

Box 625 

East Freedom, PA 16637 

Deborah Stahl 
Rd 2 Box 54 
Martinsburg, PA 16662 

David Stauffer 
1548 Bucktail Trail 
St Marys, PA 15857 

Thomas Steeley 
RD 8 Spring Valley 
Greensburg, PA 15601 

Marlene Steffan 

107 Van Ettan Avenue 

Sheffield, PA 16347 

Colleen Stevens 
546 Lindsay Road 
Carnegie, PA 15105 

Richard Stevens 

RD 2 

New Bethlehem, PA 16242 



Catherine Summerville 

Box 752 

Knox PA 16232 

James Swanson 
607 Whipple Street 
Sheffield, PA 16347 

Lisa Swanson 
14 Umburn Drive 
Albion, PA 16401 

Lisa Swanson 

26 W. Congress Street 

Corry, PA 16407 

Kristen Swick 

Box 144 1031665402 

Russellton, PA 15076 

Ajijah Talip 

Raining and Career Div. 

Malaysia 

Kella Tarabrella 

Box 274 

Shippenville, PA 16254 

Robert Taylor 
113 Andrew Trace 
Butler. PA 16001 

Kathy Tepper 

1203 Ridgeview Drive 

Latrobe, PA 15650 

Leslie Thomas 
302 Anthem Drive 
Pittsburgh, PA 15235 

Brenda Thompson 

Box 384 

Shippenville, PA 16254 

Heather Thompson 

RD 1 

Fairmount City, PA 16224 

Stephanie Thompson 

Box 35 

Brisbin, PA 16620 



Vicki Schreiber 

1000 Coverdale Street 

Pittsburgh, PA 15220 



Thomas Shultz 

14434 Turbridge Ctourt 

Burtonsville, MD 20866 



Marina Stohr 

9371 South Shore road 

Cuba, NY 14727 



Robert Todd 
4121 Third Street 
Aliquippa, PA 15001 



Ronald Schupp 
Main Street 
Fryburg, PA 16326 

Christine Schuster 

Box 5 

Renfrew, PA 16053 



Jeffery Shumaker 
353 Mcwilliams Road 
Trafford, PA 15085 

Stacey Slat 

9587 Castleton Drive 

Allison Park, PA 15101 



Robert Stormer 
20 Caldwell Street 
Brookville, PA 15825 

Stephanie Stotler 
590 E. Front Street 
Marietta, PA 17547 



Renee Toth 

105 Watkins Avenue 

Latrobe, PA 15650 

Clarissa Totu 

c/o Sophie Andau Box 12159 

K.K. Sabah, MY 



Tammy Schuster 
405 Glenda Drive 
Beaver Falls, PA 15010 

Douglas Schwab 
3 Maple Avenue 
Oil City, PA 16301 

Deborah Scolari 
140 Anthony Road 
St Marys, PA 15857 

Sharon Scully 

954 Jackson Avenue Ext. 

Warren, PA 16365 

Dean Scuticchio 
319 Washington Blvd. 
Pittsburgh, Pa 15237 



Kenneth Smakula 

Box 104 

Holsopple, PA 15935 

Jill Smart 

Box 43 

Penfield, PA 15849 

April Smith 
Rd Box 193a 
Batrobe, PA 15650 

Barbara Smith 
3249 Postgare Drive 
Bethel Park, PA 15102 

Catherine Smith 

RD 1 Box 14 

New Bethlehem, PA 16242 



John Straitiff 
RD 1 Box 27a 
Sigel, PA 15860 

Karen Strauser 

RD 1 

Cranberry, PA 16319 

Robin Strauser 
RD 1 Box 133 
Shippenville, PA 16254 

Sharon Strauser 

Rd 1 

Cranberry, PA 16319 

Janet Strickenberger 

Box 95 

Fryburg, PA 16326 



Timothy Trone 
5 Zielgler Mill Road 
Gettysburg, PA 17325 

Kathy Trypus 

425 Edgewood Drive 

Franklin, PA 16323 

Pamela Twigg 
Route 3 Box 284-a 
Rowlings, MD 21557 

Paul Usoff 

321 Center Street 

Franklin, PA 16323 

Thomas Valasek 
539 Chestnut Street 
Springdale, PA 15144 



Directory 



223 



EDITOR'S NOTES 

AHH!!!! 

What a relief of stress to know this book is 
completed. Through its trials and tribulations, I believe that 
the work of my staff and myself will satisfy the needs of the 
student body. 

The position of Editor-in-Chief fell into my lap in mid- 
September, since the designated person did not return to 
Clarion, This put us behind in the production process. Fortu- 
nately, I had a dedicated staff who went into action and 
caught up. 

The position of Editor-in-Chief is a trying one. I learned 
when to keep my mouth shut and when to open it. I 
learned not to assume anything or depend on anyone. I 
learned how to deal with the student body, the Clarion 
University staff, the public and the many contacts the 
Sequelle has. Also, I learned management procedur- 
es... the hard way. Though many people believe that a 
yearbook organization is strictly for communication ma- 



jors, I, a management/marketing major, have gained 
valuable business experience that I will utilize for the rest of 
my life. 

Not one person could put this book together by them- 
selves. Therefore, I would like to extend my appreciation 
to the 1989 Sequelle Staff for their work, especially Sharon 
Miller. Without her dedication and efforts, not only would I 
be in trouble..,! would be insane. Finally, I would like to 
dedicate my efforts to my parents. They have always 
been there for me when I needed them the most. I find 
myself very fortunate to have such fantastic parents. 
Thanks Mom and Dad for being yourselves, my love 
always. 

-Wendy Wieland 
1989 Editor-in-Chief 




COPY STAFF 

Sharon Miller-Editor 
Ray Bartoli 
Mimi Benjamin 
Crystal Blanding 
Steve Cindrich 
James Dentel 
Stephanie Edel 
David Fry 
Pat Glass 
Tern McDonald 
Sharon Moore 
Dovie Powell 
Kelli Radzowiecz 
Nancy Richert 
Julio Scheel 
Bill Waddell 
Kevin Wolf 
Eric Young 



PHOTOGRAPHY 
STAFF 

Randy Janney-Editor 
Jim Anthony 
Kara Bennett 
Ian Biggs 
Mike Bordo 
Vickie Clements 
Steve Cutri 
Michelle Finch 
David Fry 
Lynne Ginther 
Melanie Hoffman 
Tom Kaufman 
Laurie Kessler 
Shawn Leopardi 
Frank Lotito 
Peter McMillen 
Scott Patterson 
Sharon Moore 
Julia Scheel 
John Shuttleworth 
Melinda Sudik 
Bill Waddell 
Paul Withrow 



Layout 
Staff 



James Dentel-Editor 
Michael Dupree 
Randy Janney 
Sharon Miller 
Jim Pike 
Jeff "JD" 



Public 

Relations 

Staff 

Sharon Moore-Editor 

Fall 1988 

David Fry-Editor Sprin 

1989 

Lisa Fleeter 

Greg Loscar 

Christine Peters 

Dovie Powell 

Amy Santa 

Jill Velano 



224 



Editor's Page 





COLOPHON 



W The 1989 Sequelle was custom produced by the 
students of Clorion Unversity of Pennsylvonio during 

\ the '(988-1989 academic year. The 224 page publi- 

Acatbh wda delivered to the student body in the fall 

■Of 1989, V-U 

\ The 80ffi\$dition is a 9x12 sewed publication on 80 
'pourid gldss paper. Jostens Printing and Publishing 
pivlsldn, focoted in State College, Pennsylvania, 
pririied 2150 editions of this year's Sequelle. The 
spipV, colors used were Tempo #285 medium blue 
at\<\\T^mpo J^326 turquoise. 

\Tp'^ cover, designed by Mary Weyer, is TRU-LIFE, 
wl^^i5» iTtoieriar process color, litho and lamination. 
The^^idsheef^ ore medium blue #292 and 100% 
blab|<- print. .■',', 

aV Senior prV>\Qits were taken ai the Clarion Uni- 
versity by DMyor Photo. Inc. of Bensalem, 
Pennsylvania 



The Sequelle 
105 Riemer Cehtt^r, 
Clarior^ Wvei'Sfty ; \\ 
Clarion; -PA M?2^4 
(814)21 ' 





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